Conference sessions

Index of themes

List of sessions divided by themes

1-From Natural Processes to Geohazards

Conveners:
Biagio Giaccio, Istituto di Geologia Ambientale e Geoingegneria – CNR, Italy, biagio.giaccio@cnr.it, (lead convener) Paul Albert, Department of Geography, Swansea University, UK
Sabine Wulf, SEGG, University of Portsmouth, UKGiovanni Zanchetta, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Pisa, Italy

Scientific theme: 1: From Natural Processes to Geohazards

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: High-precision chronologies, reliable correlations and synchronisations of sedimentary records are fundamental requirements for reconstructing and understanding the evolution of Earth systems. This is particularly true for archives of the Quaternary period, which enable detailed observation and evaluation of dynamic Earth processes (e.g., climate change, tectonics, volcanism) during the relatively recent past, and are therefore critical to understanding current processes, along with forecasting future scenarios.
Within this framework, Tephrochronology – the method through which sedimentary successions can be dated and synchronized via geochemical and geochronological fingerprinting of tephra (volcanic ash) – has in recent decades been affirmed as an outstanding chronological tool for addressing a number of classical topics in the Quaternary Sciences (e.g., paleoclimatology, archaeology, paleogeography, past sea level change). While in more recent years, distal tephrochronology has been increasingly exploited for volcanological purposes becoming a fundamental and integrative tool for detailed reconstructions of the history, dynamics and tempo of explosive volcanism.
This session welcomes contributions focused on both methodological/analytical advances in Tephrochronology,
along with its application in any area of the Quaternary Sciences, and/or Volcanology, worldwide.

Conveners:
Alessandro Mancini, Department of Earth Science, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Italy, alemancini84@yahoo.it, (lead convener)
Francesco Frondini, Department of Physics and Geology, University of Perugia, Italy
Sándor Kele, Eötvös Loránd Research Network-Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research-Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Science, Budapest, Hungary
Enrico Capezzuoli, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Florence, Italy

Scientific theme: 1: From Natural Processes to Geohazards

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Physical, chemical and biological processes influence geogenic CO2 emissions within the Earth System. Quantifying the carbon fluxes between solid Earth and its atmosphere is important to better define the geological carbon cycle and the possible global climate perturbations. Carbonate precipitation, often mediated and induced by biological activity, both in marine and continental settings, represents an important proxy to estimate climate changes and also CO2 emissions in the geological record. Geogenic carbon dioxide emissions are related to different environmental settings of the Earth’s surface. Proxies of such processes are recorded as active and quiescent volcanoes systems, active/fossil fault zones, geothermal systems and CO2 rich groundwaters. The session is open to all contributions concerning methodologies and approaches aiming in quantifying the geogenic carbon cycle from carbonate deposits (including facies analysis, 3D volume reconstructions, geochemical and geochronological investigations) and allowing to improve the knowledge about these processes, especially during the Quaternary. Understanding the role of global and local geogenic carbon dioxide emissions affecting the Earth System and the related climate changes represents an important step forward in the interpretation and study of possible future climatic scenarios.

Conveners:
Peter Frenzel, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Geosciences, Germany, peter.frenzel@uni-jena.de, (lead convener)
Anna Pint, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Geosciences, Germany Steffen Mischke, University of Iceland, Iceland

Scientific theme: 1: From Natural Processes to Geohazards

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: Ostracods are classical microfossils through most parts of the Phanerozoic. Their main period of application, however, is the Quaternary. Here, they have proven their worth especially in palaeolimnology. Typical fields of application are palaeoclimate, palaeoenvironments, sea level studies, geoarchaeology, environmental micropalaeontology, geohazard studies or biostratigraphy. We want to show the wide range of ostracod applications as proxies and their potential for Quaternary research. Hence, this session calls for presentations of new and improved methods, innovative applications and interesting case studies mainly based on ostracod
analysis. We intend to offer a special issue of Palaeolimnology to contributions of this session.

Conveners:
Daniela M. Kröhling, CONICET and National University of Litoral (UNL), Santa Fe, Argentina, dkrohling@santafe- conicet.gov.ar, (lead convener)
Valdir F. Novello, Department of Geosciences, University of Tübingen, Germany Alexandra Alvarado, Instituto Geofísico, Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito, Ecuador
Stella M. Moreiras, IANIGLA-CONICET (Instituto Argentino de Nivología, Glaciología y Ciencias Ambientales), Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina
Silvana Hidalgo, Instituto Geofísico, Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito, Ecuador

Scientific theme: 1: From Natural Processes to Geohazards

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: South America (SAm) is a continent of special interest to explore Quaternary paleoclimate changes from tropical to high latitudes, and from the Andes to the Atlantic coast throughout different terrestrial and near-shore marine archives. This session will include contributions to the reconstruction of environmental response to climatic changes on representative continental and coastal records of SAm. They comprise proxy data as aeolian, paludal, lacustrine, fluvial, deltaic, paleopedological, volcanic, periglacial and mass transport deposits, ice cores, speleothem records, beach ridges and cheniers, among others. Also, studies focused on the influence of volcanism and neotectonics on the Quaternary landscape evolution at regional or sub-continental scales are welcome.
The session integrates research related to tectonics or/ volcanism with interactions of surface and climate processes. The interplay relationship between landscape evolution, tectonics and climate is a strategic issue with an ongoing open discussion. Contributions dedicated to the distinction of features caused by major climatic changes from environmental variations induced by volcano-tectonic forcings are encouraged. Namely, studies that apply techniques of stratigraphy, sedimentology, geochronology, geomorphometry, geomorphology, paleopedology, paleohydrology, neotectonics, seismology, geochemistry, tephrochronology, glaciology, etc. This
Session will bring geo- and climate scientists together to interact and exchange new data and interpretations.

Conveners:
Cengiz Yildirim, Eurasia Institute of Earth Sciences, Istanbul Technical University, Turkey, and Institute of Geosciences, University of Potsdam, Germany, cyildirim@itu.edu.tr, (lead convener)
Julius Jara-Munoz, Institute of Geosciences, University of Potsdam, Germany Konstantinos Tsanakas, Department of Geography, Harokopio University, Greece Simone Racano, Institute of Geosciences, University of Potsdam, Germany

Scientific theme: 1: From Natural Processes to Geohazards

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: Recently occurred offshore earthquakes from the Indian and Pacific oceans and the Mediterranean Sea triggered a cascade of events such as uplift, subsidence, and vast tsunami waves caused to casualties and significant economic impacts along the coastal regions. The presence of densely populated urban areas and significant infrastructures (e.g., Nuclear Power Plants) vulnerable to earthquakes invoke the necessity of coastal zone concentrated earthquake hazards investigations. The characteristic landforms such as emerged and submerged marine terraces, tidal notches, abrasion platforms, strandlines, and tsunami deposits, among others, are valuable geomorphic strain markers to provide an opportunity to quantify the rates, recurrence interval, and magnitudes of past earthquakes. The mapping, dating, and modeling of these landforms open new realms in addition to conventional paleoseismic techniques (e.g., trenching) to quantify regional earthquake hazards. In this session, we invite contributions to focus on tectonic geomorphology, earthquake geology, paleoseismology, and seismic hazard implications focused on coastal areas. Abstracts that introduce new methodological and multidisciplinary approaches are especially welcome.

Conveners:
Francesco Latino Chiocci, University “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy, francesco.chiocci@uniroma1.it, (lead convener) Daniela Di Bucci, Civil Protection Department, Rome, Italy
Mitsuru Okuno, Fukuoka University, Department of Earth System Science, Japan
Daniel Sempere Torres, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Centre de Recerca Aplicada en HIdrometeorologia (CRAHI), Spain
Thomas H. Jordan, Southern California Earthquake Center, University of Southern California, USA

Scientific theme: 1: From Natural Processes to Geohazards

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Quaternary geological processes drive hazardous events (geohazards) such as earthquakes, volcanic phenomena and eruptions, tsunamis and marine geohazards, landslides, floods. These geohazards are usually interconnected, both because in many cases they share common drivers and because they are often linked in a cascading evolution.
Hazard models and event scenarios, including their probabilities and uncertainties, are the most important inputs for risk models and impact scenarios, on which disaster risk reduction (DRR) is based.
DRR is a task that society is urgently asked to address at all scales, from global to local. However, transfer scientific knowledge on Quaternary geological processes in geohazard-DRR activities, is a challenging task, as it requires combining of entities and people with different backgrounds, needs, often languages and modus operandi.
Scientific knowledge in fact must be provided in a way (zonation, different levels of probability/intensity of events, probabilistic scenarios etc.) that can be easily understood and used by decision-makers who work in the DRR field. The session welcomes contributions on experiences and good practices from around the world on how to integrate different scientific and civil protection communities and provide geological information on geohazards that can be successfully applied to achieve practical DRR results.

1A- Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

Conveners:
Franz Livio, Università dell’Insubria Dipartimento di Scienza ed Alta Tecnologia, Italy, franz.livio@uninsubria.it, (lead convener)
Sambit Prasanajit Naik, Active Fault and Earthquake Hazard Mitigation Research Institute, Busan, Korea Shalev Siman-Tov, Geological Survey of Israel, Geological Hazards Division, Jerusalem, Israel
Zoe Mildon, University of Plymouth, UK Shreya Arora, Bates College, Maine, USA Pia Victor, GFZ Potsdam, Germany

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: One of the key challenges in earthquake geology is the characterization of the temporal and spatial distribution of fault-slip and its partitioning during the coseismic, interseismic, and post-seismic periods. In fact, the temporal and spatial accumulation of slip along an active fault is essential to understand the hazard posed by the fault. Furthermore, destructive earthquakes are infrequent, even along active faults and this is an inherent limitation to the knowledge towards reconstructing the seismic cycle.
Modern techniques such as Remote Sensing, Geodesy, Geomorphology, Paleoseismology, and Geochronology play a vital role in constraining part of or full seismic cycles. In recent years t hese techniques have enhanced the accuracy and temporal coverage of the long-term as well as the short term deformation windows from a local to regional scales. However, t o decipher the deformation cycle from local scale to global scale, there is a need of better integration of such advanced techniques applied across different fault systems, globally. Furthermore, comparing the recent activity of faults with the evolution recorded on a longer time frame bridging earthquake science and landscape evolution studies is another pivotal step towards Seismic Hazard Assessment and understanding seismic cycles
The goal of this session is to bring together innovative approaches and techniques, to take a comprehensive look at the earthquake cycle for plate boundary fault systems and to fault systems sitting far away from the plate
boundary.

Conveners:
Leonello Serva, Independent Consultant, leonello.serva@gmail.com, (lead convener) Paula Marques Figueiredo, North Carolina State University, USA
Alexandra Sarmiento, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), USA Livio Bonadeo, INGV Consultant, Italy

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Determining if a fault is capable of producing surface-rupturing earthquakes is a key component to estimate seismic hazard. The methods, criteria, and challenges in assessing fault capability can vary depending on the tectonic rate for each region. This session aims to discuss and compare those methods in different geodynamic domains.
Duration should be at least 2.5 h, including a 10-mins break. Discussion will be introduced by 4 short presentations (10 mins each):
• Aybars Gurpinar: Fault capability and fault displacement hazard analysis for Nuclear Installations
• Paula M. Figueiredo: Fault activity, slip rates, earthquake characterization: dogmas in Geology
• Alexandra Sarmiento: How geologic data and uncertainties are used in hazard calculations
• Livio Bonadeo: The capable faults within Italian territory: assessment, use and related problems After, the panel discussion will start; Conveners will aim to actively engage attendees. We highlight that many potential attendees expressed their availability for a fruitful discussion.
Key Discussion Topics:
1) Recency of fault activity in regions with different tectonic activity; time intervals to assess capable faults within different seismotectonic domains
2) Suitability of geochronology methods to define fault activity and what should be done to assess capability when dating is questionable
3) Differences in methodologies used to estimate earthquake recurrence interval, magnitude and fault
displacement (primary and/or distributed)

Conveners:
Tejpal Singh, CSIR-Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Chandigarh,India, geotejpal@yahoo.co.in, (lead convener)
C P Rajendran, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore, India Riccardo Caputo, University of Ferrara, Italy

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: The India-Asia convergence system has produced the most spectacular topography with peak elevations exceeding 8 km amsl. This magnificent topography is spread over more than 2000 km in length and 500 km wide. It defines the active margin of Indian plate in the north. Further south the Indian plate margin defines active subduction in the Andaman-Sumatra region whereas an active transform margin defines the western boundary of Indian plate.
The continued northward march of the Indian plate has kept the entire system active – the manifestations of which are ingrained in its morphology and topography. The active tectonics is reflected not only by the recurrent seismicity but also by the paleoseismic behaviour that elaborates on several large earthquakes and related tsunamis in some cases.
The impact of India plate is primarily accommodated by surface uplift and lateral escape. The available uplift-rates and lateral motion along active faults represent complex geodynamic models. However, the models are more general and less specific to account for their direct application in assessing earthquake hazard. Moreover, as more new data pours in, the complexity may tend to increase. So, there arises a need to deliberate on the geodynamic complexity with the objective to reduce discrepancies and improve coherency in deformation rates measured geodetically over shorter time scales and that measured from geomorphic/paleoseismic markers and geological
structures over longer time scales.

Conveners:
Stéphane Baize, Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, France, stephane.baize@irsn.fr, (lead convener) Paolo Boncio, Università di Chieti-Pescara, Italy
Oona Scotti, Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, France Riccardo Caputo, Università di Ferrara, Italy

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Capable faults correspond to the active tectonic structures which have the potential to break the surface during earthquakes. They are thus significant sources of danger to infrastructure, facilities, and housing, because of seismic shaking and related secondary effects (landslides or liquefaction), and of surface ruptures intersecting lifelines or pipelines. Due to their interaction with the Earth’s surface, capable faults leave cumulative traces of past activity, and their geological analysis provide then insights on the Quaternary behavior of fault networks, a keystone for forecasting the hazards. Such geological contribution to hazard studies have significantly grown in the last decades.
This session, supported by the INQUA TPPT Focus Group, encourages contributions dealing with multidisciplinary approaches of Quaternary science (fault mapping and trenching, dating, geophysics, remote sensing, etc), and with hazard modelling perspectives. The session will examine how to improve the characterization of capable faults and earthquake surface effects, explore how to strengthen our knowledge of the relationship between surface faulting versus rupture parameters, both being key aspects in hazard estimation, foster cooperation between field geologists, modelers and hazard practitioners, stimulate scientists in defining criteria of practical application for quantifying fault displacement hazard; and show the strategies to compile and transfer extensive
geological datasets to databases usable by hazard modelers.

Conveners:
Emma Hocking, Northumbria University, UK, emma.hocking@northumbria.ac.uk, (lead convener) Ed Garrett, University of York, UK
Jasper Moernaut, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: This session focusses on advances in the understanding of seismic hazards made from geological records of subduction zone palaeoearthquakes and palaeotsunamis. In coastal, lacustrine and offshore settings the combined use of field methods and geophysical modelling have advanced understanding of the temporal and spatial extent of subduction zone ruptures over multiple earthquake cycles. Geological approaches are critical in extending the historical and instrumental record of great subduction zone earthquakes and associated tsunami, and have also proved to be valuable where historical records are missing. Nevertheless, challenges remain in determining earthquake recurrence intervals, defining the spatial extent of ruptures, including along-strike and down-dip rupture patterns, and in understanding the causes of slip heterogeneity during great earthquakes. We invite contributions that advance our understanding of these issues using a broad spectrum of approaches from
field observations to geophysical modelling.

Conveners:
Maria Francesca Ferrario, Università dell’Insubria, Como, Italy, francesca.ferrario@uninsubria.it, (lead convener) Jeremy Rimando, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada & McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada Giorgio Tringali, Università dell’Insubria, Como, Italy
Sotiris Valkaniotis, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece Magdalena Velazquez-Bucio, Centro de Geociencias, UNAM, Mexico

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: During seismic sequences, multiple earthquakes can generate environmental effects (surface faulting, landslides, liquefaction) or damage the built environment. Attributing earthquake damage to an individual event may be challenging, especially if the time interval between earthquakes is short; often, only the cumulative damage can be assessed.
The topics of interest of this session include (but are not limited to):
– Repeated surface rupturing of a fault strand within a short time interval;
– Analysis of secondary effects, such as landslides or liquefaction phenomena triggered either by the mainshock or by fore/aftershocks
– Macroseismic investigations of the evolution of damage throughout seismic sequences, including the application of the Environmental Seismic Intensity (ESI) scale.
The session welcomes contributions related to recent or historical earthquakes, analyzed using a broad spectrum
of techniques (e.g., remote sensing, UAV-Lidar data, field surveys, historical seismology, archeo- and paleo- seismology).

Conveners:
Francesco Iezzi, DISTAR, University “Federico II” of Naples, Italy, francesco.iezzi@unina.it, (lead convener) Jenni Robertson, Birkbeck College, University of London, UK
Alessandro Valentini, Private consultant, Italy
Joanna Faure Walker, University College of London, UK Francesco Visini, INGV, Italy

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Recent advances indicate that geological parameters obtained from active faults are key in characterising the temporal models describing the seismic activity of faults. For instance, slip-rate measurements obtained at various scales, from coseismic events to slip occurring over geological times, are used to constrain the activity of faults and their earthquake occurrence rates. However, multiple approaches available for measuring fault slip could lead to both temporal and spatial variability of slip-rate values even along the same fault.
Moreover, evidence of earthquake clustering has shown that the slip-rate of a fault may vary through time. Consequently, earthquake rupture forecast models are challenged in order to reconcile this multi-scale slip-rate variability into hazard assessments. This session aims to explore different approaches for the determination of fault slip-rates, investigate slip-rate variability and identify discrepancies into slip-rate measurements constrained over different spatial and temporal scales. We welcome contributions quantifying slip-rate variability in both space and time, for example paleoseismological trenching, geologic and morphotectonic studies, Quaternary dating, geophysical investigations, geodetic studies. This session also welcomes research that prompts a discussion on how to reconcile the multi-scale slip-rate variability into earthquake rupture forecast used for probabilistic assessments of seismic and fault displacement hazard.

Conveners:
Christoph Grützner, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany, christoph.gruetzner@uni-jena.de, (lead convener) Tamarah King, University of Oxford, UK
John Dale B. Dianala, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Philippines Léa Pousse-Beltran, Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Grenoble, France

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Active fault studies are necessary to assess seismic hazard and to mitigate the societal risks of large earthquakes. Going beyond classical paleoseismology, innovative techniques allow to better understand the behaviour of seismically active structures. Multi-disciplinary approaches can help to bridge scales, to get a more complete picture of fault activity, and to gain new insights into past large earthquakes. For this session we invite studies that present advances in paleoseismology, tectonic geomorphology, (space-) geodesy or other techniques that help us to better characterize active faults. We seek contributions that combine different methods to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the seismic hazard, and research that explores new data sources to extract information on past seismicity.
This session could include, for example, studies with any combination of remote sensing and field-based methods and/or data from historical, archaeological, geological, seismologic and/or geodetic sources (as examples).

Conveners:
Jessica Thompson Jobe, U.S. Geological Survey, USA, jjobe@usgs.gov, (lead convener)
Paula Figueiredo, North Carolina State University, USA
Christoph Gruetzner, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany Jorien van der Wal, State Supervision of Mines, Netherlands

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Seismic hazard in low-strain intraplate regions may be underestimated because active faults in these regions commonly have low historical seismicity and subtle geodetic signal and/or landscape expression and are therefore difficult to detect. Recent moderate-magnitude surface-rupturing earthquakes highlight the need to better identify and characterize potentially active faults and understand driving mechanisms and earthquake cycle behavior in these regions. Fault studies using methods like landscape analysis (morphotectonic, river profile, or drainage evolution analysis, soil development, erosion variability), tectonic geomorphology, paleoseismology, geophysics and/or remote sensing/geodesy have been integral in identifying and interpreting patterns of active deformation in low-strain regions like parts of Europe (Germany, Portugal), Australia, and the Central and Eastern United States. Landscape evolution models are also used to bring insight to sometimes cryptic signals of active faulting in a landscape. This session highlights integrating methods to identify and characterize potentially active and active faults in low-strain intraplate regions and better understand their seismic hazard. We welcome case studies that focus on identifying active deformation, understanding past fault behavior, applying landscape
evolution models to understand records of active deformation, as well as documenting surface-rupturing events in low-strain intraplate regions.

Conveners:
Nicolò Parrino, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e del Mare, Università di Palermo, Italy, nicolo.parrino@unipa.it, (lead convener)
Eshaan Srivastava, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Earth Sciences, India Pierfrancesco Burrato, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome, Italy Javed N. Malik, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Earth Sciences, India
Simona Todaro, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e del Mare, Università di Palermo, Italy

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: The present-day landscape represents the enveloped, long-term signal at the regional and local scales of the ongoing interaction between Tectonics and Climate (T&C). The markers of such interaction lie in the geomorphic and sedimentary records: fluvial and marine terraces, river profiles, stratigraphic sequences, sediment provenance and budget, alluvial fans. Therefore, the study of the landscape and of its evolution through time, and the correct interpretation of these markers provide helpful insights into the T&C perturbations that occurred in the past and furnish predictive tools on how they could evolve in the future. This session aims to combine new data, approaches, and methodologies to elucidate how the study of Landscape Evolution (LE) can be used to evaluate past climatic changes and assess both climate and seismic related multi-hazards.
We invite to submit studies highlighting how LE relates to perturbation in the T&C forces and which are the most meaningful markers to understand this relationship. We encourage multi-disciplinary and innovative contributions from field geology, geochronology, geochemistry, stratigraphy, paleo-seismology, geomorphology, tectonic geomorphology, and structural geology.
Emphasis will be given to presentations providing an integrated picture of LE case histories, considering the
interactions between the T&C forcing, the sedimentary and erosive deposits and landforms formed in the recent past and possible LE scenario forecast.

Conveners:
Andrea Brogi, University of Bari, Italy, andrea.brogi@uniba.it, (lead convener) Cihat Alçiçek, Department of Geology, Pamukkale University, Turkey
Enrico Capezzuoli, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
Volkan Karabacak, Department of Geological Engineering, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey Tonguc Uysal, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Queensland, Australia

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: “TRAVITONICS” neologism was coined by Hancock et al. 1999 to emphasize the strict relationships between travertine deposition and faulting, thus proposing the concept that travertine deposition and tectonic activity are inseparable and coeval geological processes. This challenging concept opened a new perspective for neotectonic studies, favoring the development of a new research line basically aimed at decoding travertine deposits for reconstructing more than 400 ka of seismotectonic history, overall as a result of their potential for radiometric dating.
After more than 20 years, Travitonics still remains the key concept for neotectonic investigations in those areas characterized geothermal anomalies, revealing not only about prehistoric or historic seismicity but also climate fluctuation (dry vs wet periods) and fluid-rock interaction processes in the geothermal reservoirs.
This session aims in collecting the results on Travitonics studies, depicting the new results obtained by up-to-date techniques (radiometric dating, fluid inclusions and geochemical analyses, geophysics, remote sensing) integrated with morphotectonic, stratigraphic/sedimentologic and structural studies of travertine deposits developed, or
developing, in different geological settings.

Conveners:
Jessica Pilarczyk, Simon Fraser University, Canada, jessica_pilarczyk@sfu.ca, (lead convener) Chris Hein, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, USA
Annie Lau, The University of Queensland, Australia Noelynna Ramos, University of the Philippines, Philippines

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Coastal communities are prone to a range of geohazards, including sea-level rise, storms, subsidence, earthquakes, and tsunamis. Improving our ability to forecast coastal response to driving mechanisms enables more effective decision-making about how best to manage the coastal zone. Accurate forecasts of coastal change are best achieved by combining geological field and laboratory data with predictive numerical models. However, coastal geologists and numerical modellers often approach the issue in different and not always complementary ways. We welcome abstracts that address this challenge through integration of stratigraphic data and/or direct observations of coastal change with numerical models to fore- and hind-cast coastal behaviour in response to drivers that operate over a range of spatio-temporal scales. Example topics include coastal morphodynamics, sea- level change, coastal hazards (storms, earthquakes, and tsunamis), and statistical approaches leading to an
enhanced understanding of geological datasets. This session is a contribution to IGCP Project 725: Forecasting Coastal Change.

Conveners:
María Ortuño, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain, maría.ortuno@ub.edu, (lead convener) Magdalena Velázquez-Bucio, Centro de Geociencias, UNAM, Messico
Pierre Lacan, Centro de Geociencias, UNAM, Messico Octavi Gómez-Novell, Univ. de Chieti-Pescara, Italy Stella Moreiras, IANIGLA-CCT Mendoza, Argentina

Scientific theme: 1A: Earthquakes, palaeo-earthquakes and seismic hazard

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: OLLIN (OLLIN-IGCP669, Unesco-IUGS) is a project aiming to set up a new collaborative framework between specialists and young researchers to improve geological knowledge and seismic hazard assessment (SHA) in populated regions of Latin America. Based on the OLLIN objectives, this session intends to discuss on how to integrate data of potentially seismogenic faults in SHA for three highly populated areas: the Transmexican Volcanic belt, in México; the Northern South American Plate Boundary, from Ecuador to Colombia and Venezuela; and the Central and Southern Andes, including fault systems from Perú, Argentina and Chile.
Knowledge on the most likely fault rupture mechanisms will be shared, with the aim of focusing work on areas relevant to SHA but lacking information on key fault parameters (slip rates, segmentation, fault rupture scenarios, maximum magnitudes, etc.). Likewise, the experience on the application and adaptation of tools used for the integration of faults into SHA will be shared, with special emphasis on specific Latin American scenarios. The session also aims to exchange knowledge on active faults and the challenges of determining and constraining key paleoseismic parameters used in SHA.
The topics of interest of this session include:
– State of the art in the identification and study of active faults in Latin America and its incorporation of SHA.
– Seismogenic potential of faults in Latin America and tools used.
– Definition of key seismic parameters.

1B- Active volcanoes

Conveners:
Daniele Casalbore, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, daniele.casalbore@uniroma1.it, (lead convener)
Rui Quartau, Instituto Hidrográfico Lisbona, Portugal Paul Cole, University of Playmouth, UK
Neil Mitchell, University of Manchester, UK
Maurizio Mulas, Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral, Ecuador Ricardo Ramalho, University of Lisbon, Portugal

Scientific theme: 1B: Active volcanoes

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: Coastal areas of active volcanoes are highly dynamic geologically. Hazardous phenomena can include rapid vertical movements leading to coastal flooding, subaerial and submarine eruptions, mass wasting processes and associated tsunamis. These have been well demonstrated recently by the Anak Krakatua collapse (2018), the Stromboli pyroclastic flows (2019), the La Palma effusive eruption (2021) and the Tonga explosive eruption (2022). The adverse effects associated with these processes are very high locally, as volcanic islands are usually highly populated and attractive places for tourists, as demonstrated by the active Aeolian Archipelago in Italy, which hosts more than 200.000 tourists per year, mostly in summer.
In this session, we welcome contributions focusing on the study and monitoring of eruptive crisis in insular and coastal volcanoes. Studies can involve field-based studies and account collection, which provide information on the nature, extent, and frequency of past events, or remote sensing, marine geophysics and geology, and numerical modelling. We strongly encourage multidisciplinary contributions that observe and quantify the possible
phenomena and models that permit quantify hazard and risk in volcanic islands and surrounding marine areas.

Conveners:
Rosa Nappi, INGV Sezione di Napoli, Osservatorio Vesusiano, Napoli Italy, rosa.nappi@ingv.it, (lead convener)
Alessandro Maria Michetti, Università degli Studi dell’Insubria, Como, Italy Raúl Pérez López, IGME Madrid, Spain
Gianluca Groppelli, CNR-IGAG, Milan, Italy Sabina Porfido, CNR-ISA, Avellino, Italy
Thomas Walter, GFZ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany

Scientific theme: 1B: Active volcanoes

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes

Abstract: In the last years, the study of complex volcano-tectonic stress field is providing new clues on the surface deformation of several volcanoes. Novel observations on volcano-tectonic features of the Ischia 2017 earthquake, Etna 2018 eruption and earthquake, and 2021 Cumbre Vieja eruption, for instance, are stimulating significant debate and allow testing a wide range of scientific ideas concerning the relations between regionally-controlled late-Quaternary fault systems, coseismic and aseismic surface rupture, magmatic activity (intrusions and eruptions) and seismic events. In particular, coseismic surface faulting has only rarely been documented in volcanic areas, which are characterized by low-energy earthquakes with magnitudes typically less than 4.
New geologic coseismic data and the macroseismic data evaluated with ESI scale for understanding the surface- faulting mechanism due to small-size or moderate earthquakes in volcano-tectonic settings are very useful to complete the gap of the available database that are significantly lacking information for magnitude range 3.0 < M
< 5.0. Moreover, the assignment of seismic intensity offers better spatial resolution, as well as an increase of the time window for the assessment of the seismic hazard, allowing to reduce the implicit uncertainty in the intensity attenuation laws in this peculiar volcano-tectonic setting.
We welcome multidisciplinary contributions based on a wide range of methodologies dealing with volcano- tectonic faulting, fissures, fractures and earthquakes, in order to estimate rupture characteristics of past earthquakes, slip-rate, earthquake occurrence model as well as the potential for earthquake surface rupture, for the mitigation the surface faulting risks.

1C- Tsunami and marine geohazards

Conveners:
Cinzia Giuseppina Caruso, INGV – Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Italy, cinzia.caruso@ingv.it, (lead convener)
Nomikou Paraskevi, NKUA – National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece Fabio Sposito, INGV – Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Italy

Scientific theme: 1C: Tsunami and marine geohazard

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes

Abstract: Complex geochemical reactions and physical processes control submarine hydrothermal systems, where life can adapt and thrive in extremely harsh environments. On account of these natural processes hydrothermal environments could potentially constitute ideal natural laboratories which will serve for investigating lit osphere- hydrosphere-biosphere interactions. Moreover, geohazards associated to submarine hydrothermal systems, which still represent a tricky enigma for the scientific community, could be better evaluated increasing preparedness during a crisis. In this session, we invite contributions dealing with natural hazards mainly related to magmatic and tectonic activities as well as to biologic and biogeochemical processes including measurements, explorations and modeling of geochemical processes over active hydroth rmal systems located bot in shallow and deep waters. For an optimal assessment of the risks, such submarine systems must be continuously monitored by a multidisciplinary scientific team and smart, novel instrumentation as part of in-situ observatories supported by discrete sampling and measurements.

Conveners:
Pedro J.M. Costa, Departamento de Ciências da Terra Universidade de Coimbra Rua Sílvio Lima Univ. Coimbra, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal, ppcosta@dct.uc.pt, (lead convener)
Vanessa M.A. Heyvaert, Royal Belgian Institute for Natural Sciences, Brussels, Belgium Sue Dawson, Dept. Geography, University of Dundee, Scotland
Marc De Batist, Professor in Marine and Sedimentary Geology Head of Department of Geology, President of the EGU SSP Division Department of Geology (WE13), Renard Centre of Marine Geology (RCMG), Belgium
Max Engel, Akademischer Rat-Laboratory for Geomorphology and Geoecology Institute of Geography, Heidelberg University, Germany

Scientific theme: 1C: Tsunami and marine geohazard

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes

Abstract: The recognition of tsunami deposits has been vital to define coastal risk and improve hazard assessments. However, their identification is complicated by often complex hydro- and morphodynamic syn-event processes and by post-event preservation issues. To mitigate these obstacles, different sedimentary environments have been studied as archives. To date, the large majority of these studies rely on onshore depositional signatures but a growing number of studies have been conducted in the (shallow) offshore due to its higher preservation potential and also because it offers a unique angle on these events.
In this session, we invite presentations that focus on coupling onshore and offshore records of tsunamis thus offering a more detailed reconstruction of past or contemporary tsunami events. We invite contributions that apply classical or state-of-the-art sedimentological proxies or empirical or numerical focus that analyse both the inundation and the backwash phases of tsunamis. We also invite studies that numerically or experimentally model erosion and deposition of tsunamis in the shallow shelf area. Furthermore, we envisage this session as an opportunity to present proof-of-concept or seminal ideas that can spread the scientific knowledge on this topic. Recognizing this as a new area for tsunami geoscience research, we particularly encourage PhD students and early
career researchers to participate. This session also aims to contribute to INQUA CMo project Namilinks.

Conveners:
Jędrzej Majewski, Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, jmmajewski@ntu.edu.sg, (lead convener)
Isabel Hong, Central Washington University, Department of Geology, USA Villanova University, Department of Geography and the Environment, USA
Kristen Joyse, Rutgers University, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, USA Lucy Buck, Birkbeck University of London/University College London, UK

Scientific theme: 1C: Tsunami and marine geohazard

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: Over 40% of the world population lives within 100 km from the coast and those populations are at risk of extreme shaking or flooding due to storms, earthquakes, and tsunamis. Therefore, assessing future risks to coastal communities relies on past and present observations of high magnitude or high intensity events. High magnitude events include the 2004 Indian Ocean and 2011 Tohoku Oki earthquakes and tsunamis. High intensity events such as Cyclone Nargis in 2008 and Typhoon Hayian in 2013 remind us that tropical storms can be equally devastating. In areas where instrumental observations are lacking, paleoreconstruction studies utilize proxies (biological, sedimentological, or chemical) and their modern analogues to develop paleorecords of geohazards in coastal environments, thus providing critical insight on the frequency and magnitude or intensity of coastal geohazards.
In this session we invite research that improves our understanding of past, present, and future coastal geohazard risk. Specifically, work aimed at developing or refining biological, geological or chemical proxies that can be applied to paleoreconstruction studies of coastal geohazards. We also encourage research that incorporates proxies and modelling to refine paleorecords of coastal geohazards. Interdisciplinary or multi-proxy studies are highly
encouraged.

Conveners:
Witold Szczuciński, Geohazards Research Unit, Institute of Geology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland, witek@amu.edu.pl, (lead convener)
Pedro J.M. Costa, Departamento de Ciências da Terra, Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal Paolo Marco De Martini, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Roma, Italy
Frango C. Johnson, Startup Incubation and Innovation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India & Project leader NamiLinks, CMP INQUA, India
Jessica E. Pilarczyk, Department of Earth Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada

Scientific theme: 1C: Tsunami and marine geohazard

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Coastal zones provide space for living and work for a large part of the world’s population, and host most of the world’s megacities. These areas are exposed to catastrophic coastal flooding caused by various processes, e.g., earthquake-generated tsunamis, hurricanes, storm surges, river floods. The sedimentary records of these floodings (inundations) significantly enhance our understanding of these rare events, particularly their landward inundation extent and frequency of occurrence. Thus, these records serve as critical tools for coastal hazard assessment. However, their application is limited by several uncertainties. The latter include the problem of differentiation of deposits left by tsunamis, storms, and other coastal flooding types, the issue of preservation potential of event deposits, as well as their age determination, and challenges related to the implementation of insights from geological records into coastal hazard reduction actions. Moreover, the impact of these events on the coastal zone environments and their evolution is little known. This session welcomes contributions on all aspects of the sedimentary record of catastrophic coastal flooding (tsunami, storm, flood) from onshore depositional environments, including studies that use established methods, as well as ones presenting applications of novel approaches (also modeling and dating) to reconstruct records of past events, their impacts on the
environment, or forecast the probability of future events.

1D- Active tectonics as multi-scalar driving processes

Conveners:
Irene Puliti, InGeo Department, University of Chieti- Pescara, Italy, irene.puliti@unich.it, (lead convener)
Lucilla Benedetti, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS-IRD-Collège de France UMR 34 CEREGE, Aix en Provence, France Joanna Faure Walker, Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction, University College London, UK
Alberto Pizzi, InGeo Department, University of Chieti- Pescara, Italy

Scientific theme: 1D: Short to long-term environmental changes (flooding, landslides, desertification, tectonics), and societal response

INQUA commission(s):

TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;
Abstract: One of the main unsolved problems in earthquake geology concerns the mechanisms and processes that produce kilometer-scale displacements from successive earthquakes on individual seismogenic faults. Earthquake ruptures, cumulative fault scarps, and geological fault structures result from the same process, observed at different timescales. However, the link between fault properties at long-term (105-6 yr; e.g., total displacement/length and segmentation pattern), mid-term (103-4 yr; e.g., length/height of fault escarpments), and coseismic rupturing requires further study. This is needed to understand better how faults grow and evolve over different time spans in order to provide a coherent and comprehensive view of fault behavior. Thus, investigating both the fault deformation rate at various timescales and the structural interactions through time is critical to developing geological models of deformation and assessing rupturing surface patterns in high seismic hazard areas. Contributions presenting datasets based on various methods in order to quantify the fault displacement and inform models to unravel fault evolution and displacement build-up are welcome (including geomorphology, structural geology, geochronology, paleoseismology, or geodesy). Furthermore, we invite studies
that model fault growth and evolution over different timescales.

Conveners:
Rob Butler, School of Geosciences, University of Aberdeen, UK, rob.butler@abdn.ac.uk, (lead convener)
Fabiano Gamberi, Istituto di Scienze Marine, CNR, Bologna, Italy
Rosanna Maniscalco, Dipartimento di Scienze biologiche, geologiche e ambientali, Università di Catania, Italy
Agata Di Stefano, Dipartimento di Scienze biologiche, geologiche e ambientali, Università di Catania, Italy

Scientific theme: 1D, Active tectonics as multi-scalar driving processes

INQUA commission(s):

CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The Mediterranean region is tectonically very active and hosts sedimentary basins of different geodynamic origins. The infill of the sedimentary basins provides records of the highly variable rate of tectonic deformation, and sea-level and climate changes. In this session we will discuss how the signals of tectonic activity can be recognized in Quaternary successions of the Mediterranean region. The aim of our session is to bring together diverse earth scientists to examine tectonics over various time-scales, using the diversity of geodynamic settings of the Mediterranean region. In addition, we show how modern techniques and methodologies provide high temporal resolutions and help in deciphering the role of tectonics in the stratigraphic records of the Quaternary successions.

1E- Short to long-term environmental changes (flooding, landslides, desertification, tectonics), and societal response

Conveners:
Dirk Sachse, German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ Potsdam, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam, Germany, dirk.sachse@gfz-potsdam.de, (lead convener)
Celice Blanchet, German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ Potsdam, Germany Rebecca Kearney, German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ Potsdam, Germany
Zoe van Kemenade, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Department of Microbiology & Biogeochemistry (MMB), Texel, Netherlands
Christine Lane, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, UK

Scientific theme: 1E: short to long-term environmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Paleoclimate archives provide unique insights into natural climatic variability and its impacts to forecast the effects of future climatic change. Past climate reconstructions serve as important benchmarks to test climate models, while uncertainties due to varying proxy sensitivities and imprecise chronologies may undermine the determination of drivers, feedbacks and threshold mechanisms during abrupt climate events.
Reducing those uncertainties and inter-site comparisons are central aims of the INTIMATE network. Recent progress in relative and absolute chronological techniques (tephrochronology, Bayesian age modelling, cosmogenic radionuclide synchronization) enable integration and comparison of multiple climate records on common timescales. New and enhanced proxies and data-model integrations enable us to disentangle different components of the climate system and track their spatial response.
We invite contributions that identify, quantify and model abrupt climatic changes during the timeframe of the INTIMATE event stratigraphy (the last glacial to interglacial cycle) and including the Holocene (123 kyrs BP – present) and link those to responses of ecosystems, landscapes and human societies. Through cutting-edge examples of proxy reconstructions and chronological methods, we will explore the causes and nature of those changes, including their spatiotemporal impacts and variability, to provide benchmarks to assess the impact of
contemporary anthropogenic climate change.

Conveners:
Eleanor Scerri, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany, scerri@shh.mpg.de, (lead convener)
Victoria Herridge, Natural History Museum London, UK
Alexandra van der Geer, Naturalis Biodiversity Centre, the Netherlands David Richards, University of Bristol, UK
Georgios Lyras, University of Athens, Greece Marco Meschis, INGV, Italy

Scientific theme: 1E: short to long-term environmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: Quaternary Mediterranenan islands have become a classic example of a “natural experiment”, with the repeated evolution (and extinction) of diverse giant and dwarf species, including dwarf elephants and giant rodents. These evolutionary processes seem to have taken place in parallel on multiple islands in both the Eastern and Western basins. The key drivers of evolution and extinction in this study system remain poorly understood however, owing to a uncertainties in local palaeographic and palaeoclimatic reconstructions, and a lack of robust, absolute chronology. At the same time, the possible role of humans in shaping Mediterranean insular faunas has received little critical attention. This multidisciplinary session will bring together new data on tectonic and sea level change; geochronology of ‘classic’ and new sites; palaeogenetic and morphological evidence for faunal evolution and mainland ancestry; new palaeontological evidence, and new archaeological data for human presence/impact on Mediterranean islands faunas. These papers will generate renewed discussion on these important lost ‘Galapagos’ of the Mediterranean, with implications for understanding the dual climate and biodiversity crisis today. Specifically, the session will look at the changing land area of islands in relation to sea level, faunal turnovers and mainland ancestry and dispersal routes, and the impact of the earliest humans on
these fragile ecosystems.

Conveners:
Daniela Ruberti, Dip. Ing, Università degli Studi della Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Italy, daniela.ruberti@unicampania.it, (lead convener)
Carla Buffardi, Università degli Studi della Campania Luigi Vanvitelli – Dip. Ing., Italy Pietro Teatini, UniPd-ICEA, Italy
Luigi Tosi, National Research Council – Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, Italy Philip S.J., Minderhoud, Wageningen University, Deltares, Netherlands

Scientific theme: 1E: short to long-term environmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: Sea-level rise seriously jeopardizes many low-lying coastal plains threatening high valuable transitional environments such as deltas, estuaries and lagoons as well as compromising the economy of society, for example that related to farming and tourism. Holocene estuaries, deltas, lagoons and associated coastal plains are formed by complex subsurface architectures inherited from the evolutionary dynamics of transitional environments in a sea level rise context.
Holocene coastal deposits, due to their geo-mechanical and hydro-stratigraphic characteristics, have a fundamental role in driving land subsidence and saltwater intrusion. Land subsidence rates, which reflect regional and local tectonic effects, can be greatly enhanced by primary consolidation and creep of the Holocene deposits, thus resulting in an additional vertical movement at ground surface.
Holocene coastal aquifers, groundwater reserves, and continental-sea groundwater exchanges depend on hydro- stratigraphic setting, which in turn reflects the evolution of depositional environments during marine transgression.
This session aims to explore the role of the architecture of Holocene deposits in deltas, estuaries, lagoons and coastal plains in controlling and driving land subsidence and saltwater intrusion by taking into account a variety of independent factors. The focus is on the sedimentary architecture and the related geotechnical and hydrological characteristics.
We encourage studies addressing a wide range of spatial and temporal scales and applying state of the art methodologies. Interdisciplinary studies are strongly encouraged as they provide the basis for a sustainable
management.

Conveners:
Soetkin Vervust, Vrije Universiteit Brussels (VUB), Belgium, soetkin.vervust@vub.be, (lead convener)
Liz Chamberlain, Wageningen University, Netherlands
Hanna Hadler, Mainz University, Germany
Bente Sven Majchczack, Kiel University, Germany
Harm Jan Pierik, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands, Netherlands
Mans Schepers, Groningen University, Netherlands

Scientific theme: 1E: short to long-term environmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes

Abstract: In this session we explore coupled human-environment dynamics in coastal areas during the late Quaternary. Doing so, we seek new ways to learn from the coastal geological record and from cultural heritage to deal with current global challenges.
Humans have inhabited coastal areas for millennia, leaving behind a rich heritage record. Coasts also hold many geological archives of landscape evolution, which resulted from an often complex interplay of climate and sea- level changes, geomorphological processes and human action. Unlocking, combining and interpreting these records can reveal how people adapted their practices to changing environments, how they (increasingly) modified landscapes towards their needs, and the short-term and long-term effects of land and water engineering strategies.
We welcome contributions using a wide range of approaches including but not limited to mapping, stratigraphy and sedimentology, numerical modelling, machine learning, remote sensing, geophysical and geochronology techniques. These approaches are applied in an innovative way to further unravel human-environment interactions in coastal landscapes, either onshore or offshore. Also studies that use interdisciplinary research to deal with growing data quantities are welcomed. Presented examples may integrate archaeology, history, coastal geomorphology, and palaeoecology. We encourage contributions linking their research to solutions for global
challenges and/or heritage management.

Conveners:
Alessandro Fontana, Department of Geoscience – University of Padova,Italy, alessandro.fontana@unipd.it, (lead convener)
Jürgen Herget, Department of Geography – University of Bonn, Germany Lothar Schulte, Department of Geography – University of Barcelona, Spain
Juan A. Ballesteros Cánovas, National Museum Natural Sciences, Madrid, Spain

Scientific theme: 1E: short to long-term environmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Along the Quaternary the continental water cycle experienced important changes, including both extreme events of different magnitude, duration and geographical extent and long-term trends that shaped fluvial landscapes. Hydrological variability caused by climate and environmental forcing are recorded in stratigraphic sequences of river and lake deposits, botanical archives and, more recently, archaeological and historical evidence. In this session, besides the recognition and characterization of both floods and droughts, major topics are represented by the detection of changes in liquid and solid discharge along decades and millennia, with their effects on channel patterns, alluvial landforms, lakes and ancient societies. Contributions with multi-disciplinary approaches are warmly suggested, bringing together scientists from various disciplines, with the aim of integrating different sources of data, methods and research perspectives. The session wants also to highlight innovative techniques and reference case studies for disentangling global forcing factors from local and autocyclic variables. The focus of session is on hydrological changes of the past, anyhow attention is also paid to simulation of past extreme events for assessing the possible variations and scenarios expected in the near future.
The session is co-organized by TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History group HYPEDAE (PalaeoHYdrological, -PEdological and -Aeolian processes shaping Quaternary landscapes) and PAGES Flood
Working Group.

2-Landforms, facies Architecture and sequence stratigraphy

Conveners:
April S. Dalton, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada, aprils.dalton@gmail.com, (lead convener) Evan J. Gowan, Kumamoto University, Japan
Anna L. C. Hughes, University of Manchester, UK
Bethan J. Davies, Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
Scientific theme: 2: Landforms, facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy
INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History
Abstract: One of the defining features of the Quaternary is the orbitally driven waxing and waning of continental ice sheets in both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere. The evolution of these ice sheets had a profound impact on the Earth System, including (i) sea level fluctuations on the order of 110-130 m, (ii) dramatic alteration of global air and ocean circulation patterns (iii) substantial sculpting of the landscape, and (iv) reorganization of continental drainage. Understanding the evolution of Quaternary ice sheets is necessary to calibrate and test climate proxies and models. In this session, we encourage the submission of studies focused on empirically reconstructing continental ice sheets across all intervals of the Quaternary. We welcome studies on a variety of topics, including glacial/geomorphic mapping, moraine chronologies, proglacial lake records, terrestrial sediment archives, drainage basin change, relative sea level change, and related methodological improvements. We also encourage new studies that reconstruct the volume of ice sheets through time, through modelling using glacial
isostatic adjustment techniques, ice sheet modelling, or “dip-stick” records.

Conveners:
Pradeep Srivastava, Indian Institute of Technology, India, pradeep@es.iitr.ac.in; pradeep71s@rediffmail.com, (lead convener)
Biniita Phartiyal, Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, India
Rasmus Theide, Institut für Geowissenschaften, Christian Albrecht Universität zu Kiel, Germany Vikrant Jain, Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar, India

Scientific theme: 2: Landforms, facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract:
Mountain belts, due to their strong gradients in tectonics, relief and orography are fostering surface processes and landscape dynamics. The modern mountain landscapes are transient features characterized by pronounced fluvial terraces, gorges, weathering profiles, succession of moraines, landslide dam lakes which provide outstanding archives to study these processes-mountain geodynamics and climate relationship. Mountain chains like Himalaya-Karakoram-Tibet; Alps, Andes, Rockies, Urals, Appalachians are affected in different ways accordingly and should be discussed.
With this session we wish to provide the platform focusing on:
i) Records of the interaction of tectonics, climate and surface processes shaping the
landscapes of our Mountain belts.
ii) Records of past hydrological extreme events
iii) Records of erosion and weathering during orbital triggered climate change
iv) Paleoseismicity – neotectonic records – taking advantage of geomorphic and landscape markers to constrain Holocene and Late Pleistocene fault and/or deformation rates

Conveners:
Thomas Kolb, Uni Gießen – Germany, thomas.r.kolb@geogr.uni-giessen.de, (lead convener) Gilles Rixhon, Uni Strassbourg, France
Dominik Faust, TU Dresden, Germany

Scientific theme: 2: Landforms, facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Time lags in sedimentary sequences due to past erosion events frequently impedes our ability to reconstruct Quaternary landscape evolution. Furthermore, complex landscape systems and associated geomorphic processes are inherently characterized by different response times or “lag times”. For instance, recent studies of Quaternary terrace formation highlighted a diachronic progression of alluvial deposition and/or terrace abandonment along the longitudinal river profile. Thus, numerically dated alluvial deposits pertaining to the same terrace level show different ages, a finding that invites an intensive scientific exchange of views. Comparable diachronous depositional scenarios are also conceivable in other sedimentary environments as well, which would also result in a change of perspective in this specific research field. Against this background, previously well- established theoretical approaches need to be reevaluated.
The proposed session breaks new scientific ground and aims to foster discussion on a new theoretical framework and/or conceptual modeling approaches with respect to the topic addressed here. We therefore welcome contributions from all sedimentary environments, including those based on numerical dating of Quaternary
archives considering the theme of the session. Contributions from young scientists are particularly welcome.

Conveners:
Piotr Weckwerth, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Spatial Management, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland, pweck@umk.pl, (lead convener)
Edyta Kalińska, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Spatial Management, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland Jan A. Piotrowski, Department of Geoscience, Aarhus University, Denmark
Andrew Russell, School of Geography, Politics & Sociology, Newcastle University, UK
Jutta Winsemann, Institute of Geology, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Hannover, Germany
Wojciech Wysota, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Spatial Management, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland

Scientific theme: 2: Landforms, facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Extreme geological phenomena with catastrophic environmental consequences have often been initiated by climate changes that occurred in the Pleistocene and occur nowadays, causing sudden increases in activity of glacial processes by forming the glacial-lake outburst floods. In addition, the rapid release of large amount of meltwater contributed to the glacier accelerating as a result of basal sliding over water saturated bed and due to tensile longitudinal stress. These extreme processes not only significantly transformed the land relief of the proglacial areas, but also water circulation in the Atlantic Ocean, resulting in the global climate changes.
Proposed session creates a space and opportunity for discussion on recent investigations on glacial-lake outburst floods and merges geological, geomorphological and sedimentological approaches and advanced numerical modeling, which all shed a new light on sediment-landform associations in reconstructions of the glacial flood- related processes. As a result of modelling, relation between sub-/proglacial outflow and ice sheet dynamics can be found along with the ability of meltwaters to collect in sub-, supra- and proglacial settings. In this session both past and present-day glaciated areas are considered and this combination helps in better understanding
environmental changes during the Quaternary and predicting them in the future.

Conveners:
Martin Stokes, University of Plymouth, UK, m.stokes@plymouth.ac.uk, (lead convener) Pedro Proença Cunha, University of Coimbra, Portugal
Paolo Mozzi, University of Padova, Italy
Bélen Thalmeier, Universidad Autónoma de Entre Ríos, Argentina Gisel Peri, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina

Scientific theme: 2: Landforms, facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Rivers and fans are key components of Quaternary landscapes, linking uplands to offshore marine settings. The ubiquity of their sediment records and morphological expression offers considerable potential for exploring landscape development, alongside interpreting climatic-tectonic controls across longer (104-106 yrs) and deeper Quaternary time. In mountainous areas, rivers and fans occur as terraced landforms configured into staircase sequences. These record surface uplift and climate-linked denudation, informing on base-level fall linked to drainage network configuration change. Climate-related river-fan terrace sedimentation gives insight into local environment changes (tributary vs trunk rivers), sediment supply-sourcing-routing and flood discharge, with variable coupling to hillslopes and glaciated uppermost catchment regions. In downstream, lowland areas, spatially extensive river and megafan / distributive fluvial systems develop thick sediment-soil sequences, providing high resolution records across longer and deeper Quaternary time. In this session, we invite researchers studying any aspect of river / fan sediment and landform archives that informs on longer term Quaternary landscape development (i.e. Pleistocene). We welcome studies applying geochronology (luminescence / ESR / cosmogenic, etc) alongside novel and integrated applications of remote sensing, geomorphology, neotectonics,
stratigraphy, sedimentology, pedology, provenance, paleohydrology and archaeology.

Conveners:
Benedict Reinardy, Stockholm University, Sweden, benedict.reinardy@natgeo.su.se, (lead convener) Lorna Linch, University of Brighton, UK
Adrian Palmer, Royal Holloway University of London, UK

Scientific theme: 2: Landforms, facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes

Abstract: Micromorphology is the detailed examination of the in situ individual components that comprise sediments at the microscopic scale, and has become an increasingly prevalent technique applied to a range of sedimentary environments. Microstructures preserved in sediments may be used to identify and recognise specific sedimentary environments and processes, thus serving as a distinct imprint or “signature” of that environment.
With the establishment of a robust and verifiable set of microstructures, our understanding of both terrestrial and marine depositional processes and deformation history has increased vastly. Viewing each component at the microscopic level provides information on how individual components of a sediment relate to each other e.g. the arrangement and distribution of individual grains or matrix. This in turn allows interpretations of environmental conditions such as stress kinematics, deformation conditions, and depositional and post-depositional processes. Micromorphology has been used alongside other sedimentary techniques to better understand many different Quaternary environments including, for example, glacial, periglacial, aeolian, lacustrine and deep/shallow marine settings. This session will provide a forum for researchers to present results and interpretations from the application of micromorphological analyses to Quaternary sediments. We invite papers applying micromorphological analyses to a range of sedimentary deposits including glacial and non-glacial sediments in both marine and terrestrial settings. We particularly encourage submissions introducing new, innovative and novel micromorphological techniques and/or applied aspects of micromorphology (e.g. 3D CT-scanning
microtomography, quantitative micro-analyses, Metripol, microstructural mapping etc.).

Conveners:
Daniel Ellerton, Stockholm University – Department of Geological Sciences, Sweden, daniel.ellerton@geo.su.se, (lead convener)
Chantel Nixon, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway James Shulmeister, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
Malin Kylander, Stockholm University, Sweden

Scientific theme: 2: Landforms, facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The coastal zone is a dynamic landscape that is sensitive to changes in terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric processes. Coastal dunes and beach barrier systems are economically and ecologically significant and contain important archives of past environmental change; they are also prone to disturbance. With predicted increases in storminess and coastal impacts related to changes in major oscillatory systems such as ENSO, NAO and the IPO under various climate-change scenarios, insights into the responses of different coastal systems to disturbance are urgently needed. Anthropogenic pressure stemming from land use (e.g., agriculture, tourism, coastal protection structures) and pollution (e.g., microplastics, heavy metals) add another dimension to consider when interpreting recent coastal sedimentary records. This session invites papers reconstructing the impacts of climate change (e.g., storminess, sea-level change) and/or paleo/historic environmental change (e.g. wave climate, anthropogenic modifications) on coastal systems over a variety of timescales from decades to millennia.
Paleostorm reconstructions are particularly welcome. Methodological and modelling papers that contribute to
these topics are also encouraged.

Conveners:
Julie Dabkowski, CNRS, Laboratoire de Géographie Physique, France, julie.dabkowski@lgp.cnrs.fr, (lead convener) Josu Aranbarri, Department of Geography, Prehistory and Archaeology, University of the Basque Country, Spain Michal Gradzinski, Institute of Geological Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Poland
Sándor Kele, Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Budapest, Hungary
Ezher Tagliasacchi, Department of Geological Engineering, Pamukkale University, Denizli, Turkey

Scientific theme: 2: Landforms, facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: Calcareous tufas and travertines have been increasingly investigated in recent decades as supports for multidisciplinary palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental research, and the interest in these continental carbonates has rapidly spread to various Quaternary sciences such as archaeology, ecosystem management and restoration, etc. At the basis of this research, geomorphological and sedimentological studies keep developing, parallel to new and improved methodologies: tufas and travertines are highly suitable for combining geochemical approaches (eg. stable or clumped isotopes) with direct dating on calcite (14C, U-Th series) or embedded grains (OSL, ESR), and bioproxies (e.g., molluscs, palynomorphs, wood/charcoal, leaf imprints) are usually associated with them. Additionally, they are widely present around the world in various geographical and climatic settings, all along the Quaternary. Thus, they have a strong potential for providing data from various disciplines, at different space and time scales. Since early Prehistory, tufas and travertines have also strong interconnections with human populations, as environments favoured for settlements but highly sensitive to anthropogenic impacts, especially during the Holocene. Lately, many active (and non-active) deposits have become touristic or protected areas.
This session aims to federate the rapidly growing community investigating tufas and travertines. Contributions
presenting multidisciplinary approaches are highly welcome.

Conveners:
Abi Stone, University of Manchester, UK, abi.stone@manchester.ac.uk, (lead convener) Kathryn Fitzsimmons, University of Tübingen, Germany
Nick Lancaster, Desert Research Institute, USA David Thomas, University of Oxford, UK
Joy Sinagarayer, University of Reading, UK

Scientific theme: 2: Landforms, facies architecture and sequence stratigraphy

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Dryland environments, spanning hyper-arid to sub-humid climates, cover ~40% of the terrestrial surface, host ~40% of the world’s human population, and are characterised by considerable seasonal and inter-annual variations in precipitation. Climatic and environmental variability in drylands has been a key characteristic over a range of timescales, including glacial to interglacial-paced impacts on temperature and hydroclimate; precessional- insolation forcing of global monsoon systems; and teleconnections with millennial-scale climate events deriving from the North Atlantic. These climatic oscillations have influenced dryland landscapes, ecology and hominin populations. Dryland responses to climatic variation are recorded in landforms (geoproxies) and in the sediments themselves, including biomarkers, soils and chemical precipitates such as speleothems, mound springs and tufas. This session showcases innovative new approaches to interpreting archives of environmental change in drylands. We welcome discussions on new proxies, geochronology and age modelling, and model-data integration.
Developments in proxies include records from soils (sediment production and soil dynamics), biomarkers preserved in dryland sediments, and interpretations of geoproxies. Some of the recent advances in age models and geochronology, include the application of changepoint analysis to luminescence datasets and developments in
calibrating the portable luminescence reader as a rapid age assessment tool.

2A- Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

Conveners:
Roger C. Paulen, Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Canada, roger.paulen@nrcan-rncan.gc.ca, (lead convener) Niko Putkinen, Geological Survey of Finland, Kokkola, Finland
Maarten Krabbendam, British Geological Survey, Edinburgh, Scotland Nick Eyles, University of Toronto, Scarborough, Canada
Martin Ross, University of Waterloo, Canada

Scientific theme: 2A: Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: In glaciated landscapes, there has been considerable recent research that advances our understanding in subglacial environments, especially with ice sheet behaviour pertaining to varying glacial conditions, in particular the important role ice streams have played. The subglacial processes that have imparted numerous, distinctive geomorphological features on the modern landscape during the retreat of continental ice sheets in both the northern and southern hemisphere. Glacial erosion under a range of environments, such as soft bed, hard bed, mixed bed lithologies and transitions between these environments, plays a role in the resultant landforms and glaciogenic sediments.
This session seeks contributions on any aspect of palaeo to modern subglacial research, including investigations of sedimentology, geomorphology, and provenance studies from a range of basal environments and including analyses drawn from glacial erosion, dispersion, landform generation, depositional studies, and laboratory-based investigation of subglacial sediments. We also welcome contributions that focus on reconstructing the glacial history of continental ice sheets, ice streams, regional geomorphology and/or sedimentology, and those that
explore their wider implications for ice sheet dynamics.

Conveners:
Daniele Spatola, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy, daniele.spatola@uniroma1.it, (lead convener) Daniele Casalbore, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy
Aaron Micallef, University of Malta, Malta Christian Gorini, Sorbonne University, France Daniel Praeg, Géoazur (CNRS UMR7329), France

Scientific theme: 2A: Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: Fluids including gas trapped within and underneath of sedimentary multilayers can move upwards to surface at discrete locations due to buoyancy. The process of “fluid venting” is a global phenomenon recognized in different geodynamic contexts, giving rise to diverse seabed morphologies (e.g., pockmarks and mud volcanoes) and to a range of associated geological, geochemical and biological phenomena. There are two main types of fluid seepage: (i) “cold seeps” characterized by low temperature fluid emissions and (ii) hydrothermal vents where fluids emerge at temperatures between 200-400°C. Marine geophysical data of varying frequency content may reveal the occurrence of gas in the water column (plumes), and below the seabed as acoustic anomalies including focused or diffused acoustic turbidity and blanking, bright spots, high-amplitude reflections, chimney or pipe structures, and bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) associated with gas hydrate. This session aims to explore the role of active submarine fluid flow and venting: (i) as a geomorphic process and how it shapes the seafloor; (ii) as a potential marine geohazard, and (ii) as a driver of biological processes. Contributions are invited from any offshore region, from continental shelves to abyssal plains, based on multi-scale datasets including hydro-acoustic imagery,
2D/3D seismic reflection data, samples and ROV observations.

Conveners:
Tomasz Kalicki, Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce, Poland, tomaszkalicki@ymail.com, (lead convener) Tobias Lauer, University of Tuebingen, Germany
David Bridgland, Durham University, UK

Scientific theme: 2A: Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Rivers have attracted humans prior to settlement in their valleys, the post-glacial evolution of Homo sapiens and of river systems becoming intertwined, first in the Old World, where this relationship dates back to earlier Quaternary times, and then spreading in the Holocene to all regions in which rivers flow. All can be included within a session that will encompass geoarchaeological data from fluvial settings in the late Quaternary, as H sapiens replaced earlier human species and then transitioned through prehistoric cultures from Upper Palaeolithic to Iron Age, then classical to medieval and later human activities, including the development of industry. The increasing human impact on the environment, at different times in different parts of the world, is well recorded by fluvial archives, both from direct archaeological evidence and from palaeoenvironmental proxies, as well as influences on fluvial geomorphology. All of these data must be distinguished from background natural influences, in particular climate, but also tectonic and other intrinsic mechanisms. The archives must also be dated, ideally by multiple methods, so applied geochronological studies of relevance to this topic will also be welcome. The session will be underpinned by the activities of the Fluvial Archives Group, linked to its Late
Quaternary coverage.

Conveners:
Carlo Mologni, CNRS CEPAM-UMR7264/TRACES-UMR5608, Nice, France, mologni@geoazur.unice.fr, (lead convener)
Asfawossen Asrat, Botswana International University of Science and Technology, Palapye, Botswana / Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Andrea Zerboni, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy Mathieu Schuster, CNRS ITES, Strasbourg, France Ilaria Mazzini, CNR-IGAG, Rome, Italy

Scientific theme: 2A: Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: East African Rift System (EARS) provide extremely sensitive records for climate reconstruction and modelling. However, recent climate and environmental sustainability studies lack focus on regional-to-local reactivity of specific Earth surface systems (hydrological, pedological, sedimentary, geomorphic). Given records of past and present global changes, current priority research topics in eastern Africa concern the dynamic of natural resources (water and soil), as well as vulnerability of the many processes interplaying along the Earth’s Critical Zone (ECZ) and controlling landscapes evolution.
The aim of this session is to bring together specialists of Earth surface processes and of pedo-sedimentary records to address fundamental scientific questions, such as: What are the impacts of climate changes on EARS landscapes, geo-eco-systems, and hydro-sedimentary dynamics? What is the role of Earth surface and/or of external factors (geomorphic, tectonic, volcanic or anthropic) on hydro-sedimentary and environmental patterns in the EARS? What are the consequences of global droughts on the dynamic of the ECZ in the EARS?
We welcome all contributions concerning sedimentology, soil science, geochemistry, geophysics, paleoclimatology, geomorphology, landscape modelling, and geoarchaeology which highlight the causes and effects of landscape and environmental evolution in the EARS throughout the Quaternary, offering a fresh
perspective on ongoing processes.

Conveners:
Guido S. Mariani, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Italy, guidos.mariani@unica.it, (lead convener)
Vera Aldeias, Interdisciplinary Centre for Archaeology and the Evolution of Human Behaviour (ICArEHB), University of Algarve, Portugal
Natalia Égüez, Archaeological Micromorphology and Biomarkers -AMBI Lab, Instituto Universitario de Bio-Orgánica Antonio González. Universidad de La Laguna, Spain

Scientific theme: 2A: Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: Micromorphology on soils and sediments has become a key tool for the understanding of terrestrial sequences and the evolution of Quaternary environments. In the last decades, micromorphological studies have found application in a broad range of studies on both natural deposits and archaeological contexts. The collection of new information and case studies from a broad range of subjects such as geomorphology, soil science, geoarchaeology, continental stratigraphy, has largely increased the effectiveness of this discipline in retrieving proxies for environmental change on a local and regional scale.
As such, we welcome research that provides new insights on the value and potential of both established and new micromorphological approaches on natural and anthropogenic sedimentary sequences. We aim to put together contributions from a variety of topics, including, but not only, environmental and climate variations, soil formation processes in time, human-landscape interactions, and human occupation dynamics. Submissions engaging with specific topics through novel approaches or highlighting the complexity of change through multidisciplinary studies
are encouraged.

Conveners:
Sarah Woodroffe, Durham University, UK, s.a.woodroffe@durham.ac.uk, (lead convener) Juliet Sefton, Tufts University, USA
Nicole Khan, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Fiona Hibbert, University of York, UK
Lauren Toth,

Scientific theme: 2A: Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: Developing palaeo sea-level reconstructions from low latitude coastal environments is extremely important for understanding drivers and effects of past climate and sea-level change, but working in these environments can be extremely challenging because of issues related to proxy preservation, dating and interpreting environmental changes. This session welcomes contributions to on-going research efforts to quantify the magnitude of past sea-level changes and their drivers in low latitude locations globally during the Quaternary. We are particularly interested in studies that take new approaches to developing reconstructions, for example by
using novel proxy methods, or that tackle issues of dating or interpretation of proxy records.

Conveners:
Ettore Valente, Department of Earth, Environment and Resources Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Italy, ettore.valente@unina.it, (lead convener)
Ciro Cerrone, Department of Earth, Environment and Resources Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Italy Francesco Pavano, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lehigh University, USA

Scientific theme: 2A: Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Landscape evolution is the result of a combination of erosional and depositional processes, which may act at different time and spatial scales. As a result, mountains erode, and basins fill at rates that tend to mirror each other. Temporal variation in such rates may reflect external (e.g., climate, tectonics) and internal (e.g., delta dynamics, fluvial captures) perturbations. All these elements make the reconstruction of landscape evolution a challenging task. To unravel this issue, classical geomorphological approach may be integrated with morphometrical analysis of the topography and with data from the stratigraphic record. The latter includes data from both outcropping and buried marine and continental Quaternary deposits. Absolute dating of these Quaternary deposits may thus provide chronological constraints to the geomorphic processes that had driven their deposition.
This session aims to receive contributions dealing with:
• Inferring the role of climate, lithology and tectonics on the spatial-temporal distribution of geomorphic processes
• Chronological constraints to landscape evolution
• Morphostratigraphic analysis of marine and continental Quaternary deposits
• Morphometrical analysis of drainage basin – alluvial fan systems
• Defining the role and mechanisms of fluvial dynamics in producing and delivering sediments to the basins, thus empowering or shredding environmental changes signals
• Detecting surface uplift by offset Quaternary landforms and/or deposits

Conveners:
Harm Jan Pierik, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands, Netherlands, hj.pierik@cultureelerfgoed.nl, (lead convener)
Henk Alkemade, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands, Netherlands Cristina Giovagnoli, Geological Survey of Italy, Italy
Clare Glanville, Geological Survey Ireland, Ireland

Scientific theme: 2A: Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: Geoheritage concerns the management of valuable geological or geomorphological features in the landscapes. These may be landforms, soils, caves, outcrops or quarries. Such sites generally have played an important role in the research history of earth sciences. They furthermore often contain valuable ecosystems and they may be closely linked to cultural heritage. Although some sites are protected, many other valuable areas are under threat of e.g. urban and industrial developments, climate change or climate adaptation measures.
This session explores the involvement of the scientific community into geoheritage. How can scientific knowledge contribute to geoheritage? How can earth scientists help selecting and managing them? What is the relevance of geoheritage for society? How could geoheritage contribute to sustainable development of various land use types? Contributions that link abiotic, biotic and cultural components in relation to these questions are welcomed. Case studies may deal with areas that have an official heritage status (e.g. UNESCO GEOparks), but contributions may
also involve with other sites worth preserving for future generations.

Conveners:
Cathy Delaney, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK, c.delaney@mmu.ac.uk, (lead convener) Kathryn Adamson, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK
Adrian Palmer, Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
Renata Giulia Lucchi; National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics (OGS), Trieste, Italy and UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; rglucchi@ogs.it, Universiteit Gent, Belgium
Matthew Carney, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK

Scientific theme: 2A: Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Proglacial lakes are, and have been throughout the Quaternary, a fundamental component of the cryosphere. They impact on glacier/ice sheet, meltwater and groundwater dynamics, sediment flux, and local, regional and global climate. Ice-contact lakes alter ice sheet and glacier behaviour, changing ice flow dynamics, ice retreat rates and trajectories, and are increasingly included in computer-based modelling of past and future ice sheet evolution. Both ice-contact and distal, glacier-fed lakes act as sediment sinks and contain a high-resolution record of sediment and meltwater inputs, which can be interrogated using physical, biological and geochemical proxies. For this session, we invite presentations on all aspects of ice sheet, glacier and environmental reconstruction using proglacial lake archives, including sedimentological and geomorphological records. Of particular interest are presentations focusing on the application of these records to model the impact of ice-
contact lakes on ice sheet and glaciers through time.

Conveners:
Brendan Fenerty, Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, USA, bfenerty@email.arizona.edu, (lead convener)
Jason Windingstad, Department of Environmental Science, The University of Arizona, USA

Scientific theme: 2A: Geomorphic processes and sedimentary record

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Evidence for the expansion and contraction of lakes and wetlands preserved in dryland endorheic basins provides direct evidence for temporal shifts in patterns of moisture transport over the continents. Understanding how these hydrologic changes relate to the abrupt, high-amplitude changes in global atmospheric and oceanic circulation of the last deglaciation and early Holocene can inform projections of local and regional hydrologic responses to ongoing and future anthropogenic warming. In many dryland regions, these projections remain poorly constrained due, in part, to a lack of accurate determinations of the timing and magnitude of past hydrologic changes. This session features new and revised reconstructions of late Quaternary hydroclimate based on variability in the hydrologic balance of dryland endorheic basins as recorded by the elevation of shoreline features and (or) changes in the primary productivity, chemical composition, mineral precipitation, and sedimentation of playa-lacustrine and groundwater discharge deposits.

2B- Glacial and periglacial geomorphology

Conveners:
Adriano Ribolini, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Pisa, Italy, adriano.ribolini@unipi.it, (lead convener) Magali Delmas, Department of Geography, University of Perpignan, France
Manja Žebre, Geological Survey of Slovenia, Department for Regional Geology, Slovenia
Matteo Spagnolo, Department of Geography and Environment, University of Aberdeen, Scotland Philip Hughes, University of Manchester, School of Environment, Education and Development, UK Mehmet Akif Sarikaya, Istanbul Technical University, Eurasia Institute of Earth Sciences, Turkey

Scientific theme: 2B: Glacial and periglacial geomorphology

INQUA commission(s):
TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The Quaternary glaciers of the many mountain chains scattered around the wider Mediterranean region have attracted the attention of scholars since at least the early 20th century. The introduction of modern dating techniques in recent decades has represented a great impetus in palaeoglaciers research and, to date, many terminal moraines can be framed in the palimpsest of Pleistocene cold events recorded in different climate- proxies. However, the research has not been balanced across the various mountain sectors, also due to the difficulties in obtaining accurate and conclusive information in some environmental contexts. Thus, several key palaeoenvironment questions remain partly unanswered: a precise extent of glaciers at different glacial and interglacial times, the potential climate-mitigating effect of the Mediterranean Sea, the role of the moisture- bearing North Atlantic air masses, and that of the shifting polar front. In this session, we want to take stock of the state of knowledge of Quaternary glaciers in the mountains of the Mediterranean region, and their potential contribution to improve our understanding of palaeoenvironment and/or palaeoclimate conditions. We welcome contributions related to glacial and, where relevant, periglacial geomorphology and chronology, as well as paleoenvironmental reconstructions based on palaeoglacier modeling, pertinent to either a specific geographical
sector or encompassing the entire region.

Conveners:
Jasper Knight, University of Witwatersrand, South Africa, jasper.knight@wits.ac.za, (lead convener) Stephan Harrison, University of Exeter, UK

Scientific theme: 2B: Glacial and periglacial geomorphology

INQUA commission(s):
TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: This session examines the dynamics of mountain systems under climate change and brings together new data and case studies in order to examine the responses of these systems to past and present climate change. The session is specifically concerned with sediment and geomorphic system processes, landforms and dynamics; and cryosphere (glacial, periglacial, paraglacial) processes, landforms and dynamics, that take place in both glaciated and non-glaciated mountains worldwide. Particular focus is paid to the role of climate forcing in mountain dynamics, under Quaternary climate phases and/or under present global warming of the Anthropocene.
Contributions are invited to this session based on field, remote sensing and modelling case studies from mountains worldwide. An outcome of this session is to develop a better understanding of mountain systems, their
sensitivity to climate forcing, and their variable expressions in mountain landscapes.

Conveners:
Lorna Linch, University of Brighton, UK, l.linch@brighton.ac.uk, (lead convener) Danni Pearce, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway
Jan Piotrowski, Aarhus University, Denmark Dave Evans, Durham University, UK

Scientific theme: 2B: Glacial and periglacial geomorphology

INQUA commission(s):
TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Cold region sediments and landforms provide important information about the dimensions, distribution and dynamics of ice sheets and glaciers. Some of these sediment-landform associations are known only from the palaeo-record: for example from drained lake floors, continental shelves, or from the former beds of large mid- latitude ice sheets. This record can be used to understand palaeo-ice-mass dynamics, reconstruct climate, and refine our understanding of the future response of ice sheets and glaciers to variations in climate. The aim of this session is to bring together researchers working on cold region sediments and/or landforms, with a view to reconstructing Quaternary glaciations. We invite contributions from those investigating both onshore and offshore cold region landforms/sediments at all scales (macro-, meso-, micro-), and from all parts of the world. Studies
adopting a multi-disciplinary approach (e.g. field, laboratory, remote sensing/GIS, drones, modelling etc.) are particularly welcome.

Conveners:
Frank Preusser, University of Freiburg, Germany, frank.preusser@geologie.unifreiburg.de, (lead convener) Flavio Anselmetti, University of Bern, Switzerland
Markus Fiebig, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria Gerald Gabriel, Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics, Hannover, Germany

Scientific theme: 2B: Glacial and periglacial geomorphology

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: This session addresses overdeepened valleys and basins, which are found below the present landscape surface in areas formerly affected by glaciations. As they reach below their fluvial base level, overdeepened structures are of glacial origin, presumably formed by pressurized subglacial meltwater. In mountain belts, overdeepened features mainly follow tectonic structures, weak lithologies, and/or Pleistocene ice confluence and diffluence situations. Overdeepening resulted in buried elongated valleys, mainly oriented parallel to former ice flow, and glacially scoured basins in the ablation area of glaciers. In the session, primary data from ice-proximal signals from overdeepened structures can be compared with published information from distal basin infills.
Comparison with the global marine ice-volume record is aspired. Understanding and interpretation of glacial sequences also provide the base to develop a better picture of past atmospheric circulation during glacial times. Presentations dealing with all aspects of such overedeepenings including formation, infill, chronology,
paleoenvironmental significance and applied aspects are welcome.

Conveners:
Jenna Sutherland, Leeds Beckett University, UK, j.l.sutherland@leedsbeckett.ac.uk, (lead convener) Jonathan Carrivick, University of Leeds, UK
Jacob Yde, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norwey Fiona Tweed, Staffordshire University, UK
Adam Emmer, University of Graz, Austria Georg Veh, University of Potsdam, Germany

Scientific theme: 2B: Glacial and periglacial geomorphology

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Proglacial lakes are receiving increased attention within modern rapidly-deglaciating alpine mountain regions and at ice sheet margins of the World. However, proglacial lakes are also prevalent within the Quaternary record and can provide exceptional breadth and depth of palaeo-environmental information. This session invites presentations describing recent research on the character, evolution and behaviour of proglacial lakes, both ‘ice- marginal’ or ‘ice-contact’ lakes and other distal proglacial lakes, and related processes. We expect to receive presentations elucidating the impact of proglacial lakes on (i) mountain glacier and ice sheet margin dynamics, and
(ii) on downstream meltwater flux and sediment yield. We anticipate a particular focus to be on the identification, monitoring and modelling of geohazards from proglacial lakes, namely glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) or jökulhlaups, megafloods and other glacier-related floods, including debris flows and bank erosion that are
evidenced in the Quaternary record.

Conveners:
Shubhra Sharma, Department of Geography, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India, shubshubhra@gmail.com shubhra@bhu.ac.in, (lead convener)
Naresh Rana, Department of Geology, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India

Scientific theme: 2B: Glacial and periglacial geomorphology

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: One of the spectacular manifestations of past climate change was the fluctuating Himalayan glaciers, which have also greatly modified land surfaces. The glaciers seem to have responded to the millennial/centennial- scale post-last glacial maxima climate fluctuations. Understanding the response to these minor natural forcing factors especially becomes important in the recent anthropogenically induced rise in global temperature that has led to the dramatic decrease in the ice volume. The Himalayan glaciers are not only a source of freshwater but also a key source of sediments that often get mobilised during extreme events. However, the understanding of the Himalayan glaciated terrain to the climate variability is yet limited by sparse geomorphological mapping and coarse chronometric resolution.
The session invites abstracts from studies focusing on the Quaternary glaciation of the Himalayas, particularly since the last glacial maxima. Also, studies focusing on the response of the paraglacial zones to climate variability
are welcome.

2D- Coastline changes under the effects of climate and geological processes

Conveners:
Gaia Mattei, Department of Science and Technology, Parthenope University of Naples, Italy, gaia.mattei@uniparthenope.it, (lead convener)
Claudia Caporizzo, Department of Science and Technology, Parthenope University of Naples,Italy Ana Novak, Geological Survey of Slovenia, Slovenia
Livio Ronchi, Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, Italy
Martin Seeliger, Institute of Geography and Geology, University of Greifswald, Germany

Scientific theme: 2D: Coastline changes under the effects of climate and geological processes

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: Coastlines and coastal landforms are known to be among the most dynamic elements of the physical landscape, whose evolution is strictly related to endogenic factors (i.e. tectonics, isostasy, and volcanism) and surface processes (i.e. erosion, transport and sedimentation). Nevertheless, seasonal and catastrophic meteo- marine events and human impacts can directly interfere with coastal changes. In a wider timescale, climate changes are one of the main factors influencing coastal evolution mainly due to sea-level variation.
In this general context, NEPTUNE project aims to create an interdisciplinary scientific community of experts in order to combine different techniques to analyze and reconstruct past coastal and nearshore landscapes and their changes through time, under the umbrella of the INQUA Coastal and Marine Processes Commission.
This session welcomes contributions presenting recent advancements on Quaternary coastal paleo-landscape reconstructions from the onshore to the offshore, as well as studies on regional and local coastal modification that followed relative sea-level changes or extreme events in historical and recent times. The main topics are:
– From field data to modelling approaches for paleo-landscape reconstructions;
– Sea-level and coastal response to past and future climate changes;
– Recent climatic influence on coastal modification;
– Analyzing coastal landscapes from backshore to offshore;
– Adaptation of coastal communities to climate and sea-level changes;
– Technological advances in marine and coastal studies.

Conveners:
Sergio Cappucci, ENEA, Italy, sergio.cappucci@enea.it, (lead convener) Duccio Bertoni, University of Pisa, Italy
Arthur Trembanis, University of Delaware, USA Stefano Andreucci, University of Cagliari, Italy Jonathan Benjamin, Flinders University, Australia

Scientific theme: 2D: Coastline changes under the effects of climate and geological processes

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: Quaternary coastal evolution has been described in many areas around the world at different time and spatial scales. Both natural and anthropogenic processes contribute to coastal changes. Sea level fluctuations is one of the main factors affecting geomorphological variation along the coasts, but not all formations respond rapidly to short term variations (sub-millennial scale). In addition, shoreline development can also be influenced by subsidence, tectonics, sediment supply, or other oceanographic variables such as wave and tidal processes. Many anthropological studies have shown that human migrations, customs and habits have been influenced by climate and geological changes. More recently, natural resources management, urbanization of coastal areas, proliferation of coastal infrastructures and/or beach nourishments have modified coastal landforms and generated drastic human-induced changes.
Erosion and deposition processes and related landforms and stratigraphy of coastal deposits may change over time, causing vulnerability of the interconnected littoral locations and opening new frontiers on geo-hazard analysis and geo-resources management. The impact on local and global economy is significant, but still challenging to determine. Quaternary science research should focus on the distinction between natural and human-induced processes considering, where it is possible, paleo-climate variation and environmental changes. In particular, contributions on the debate on Holocene-Anthropocene and ecological transition, and their
stratigraphic expressions in coastal settings are welcome.

Conveners:
Helena L. Filipsson, Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden, Helena.filipsson@geol.lu.se, (lead convener) Kotaro Hirose, Institute of Natural and Environmental Sciences, University of Hyogo, Japan
Karl Ljung, Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden

Scientific theme: 2D: Coastline changes under the effects of climate and geological processes

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: Throughout history and pre-history, societies have lived with the dynamic nature of coastal environments. Coastal environmental are also under pressure from increasing intensity of human activity. Geophysical and ecological survey techniques along with palaeoenvironmental records and archaeological investigations are providing new insights into climate variability and human-environment interactions in the coastal zone over a range of timescales.
We encourage contributions which address the following themes:
• Multi-disciplinary studies exploring human-environment interactions in the coastal zone, including impacts of storms, inundation and coastal erosion.
• Human impacts on coastal aquatic environments, such as eutrophication, deoxygenation, environmental pollution (heavy metals, black carbon, microplastics etc), ocean acidification.
• High-resolution palaeoenvironmental records of coastal change and / or storm histories.
• Geophysical mapping and palaeoenvironmental studies of submerged and intertidal landscapes.
• Innovative approaches to monitoring climate change impacts on coastal and submerged heritage.
• The linkages between changes in land-use, terrestrial vegetation composition and the storage and transportation of carbon and nutrients into the coastal zone; explored using quantitative palaeo-proxy based reconstructions such as land-use patterns in dynamic vegetation – and climate models.

Conveners:
Matt C. Strzelecki, University of Wroclaw, Poland, mateusz.strzelecki@uwr.edu.pl, (lead convener) Willem van der Bilt, University of Bergen, Norway
Sebastian Lindhorst, University of Hamburg, Germany

Scientific theme: 2D: Coastline changes under the effects of climate and geological processes

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Due to the increased dissaperance of sea-ice cover the modern Arctic becomes more vulnerable to storminess and erosion, threatening coastal communities and ecosystems. However, the consequences of future changes in Arctic storminess remain highly uncertain. Paleoenvironmental data are well-suited to close these critical knowledge gaps by providing empirical constraints on conditions that fall outside the envelope of variability covered by observations. Arctic coastal deposits including beach-ridge plains and coastal lacustraine archives are often well-preserved. Since the last deglaciation, rates of isostatic uplift in number of Arctic locations typically outpaced global sea-level rise, preserving coastal sediment sequences that cover the entire Holocene. During this session, we will discuss how Arctic paleostorminess research may contribute to better understanding of a long- term climate changes in the region and help to define the severity and distribution of coastal hazards over timeframes longer than the historical records. Contributions from both glaciated and ice-rich permafrost regions of the Arctic exploring storm signals and impacts (using geomorphological, sedimentological, geophysical and modelling tools) recorded in beach and lake sediments are particularly welcomed. Better knowledge on the extreme storms preserved in geologic archives is crucial to enable Arctic society to understand and plan for storms
of the future.

2E- Geomorphology and stratal architecture of continental margins

Conveners:
David Casas, Spanish National Research Council, Spain, davidcasas@icm.csic.es, (lead convener) Daniele Casalbore, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
Gemma Ercilla, Spanish National Research Council, Spain Aaron Micallef, University of Malta, Malta
Alessandra Savini, University of Milano Bicocca, Italy Sebastian Krastel, University of Kiel, Germany

Scientific theme: 2E: Geomorphology and stratal architecture of continental margins

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: Continental margins are characterized by a large spectrum of landforms that reflect the action or interplay of tectonic, sedimentary and oceanographic processes acting at different spatial and temporal scales. Our knowledge on these landforms and associated processes has grown exponentially in the last decades, due to the increasing collection of high-resolution multibeam bathymetric maps, especially if combined with geomorphometric analysis, seismic profiles, ROV images, seafloor observatories, samplings and/or other measurements. In addition, repeated multibeam surveys are becoming a common tool to observe seafloor changes in active areas (i.e., coastal areas, river deltas, canyon heads), allowing monitoring of the formation and evolution of specific landforms and correlating them to geological, physical oceanographic, biological and/or anthropic processes. A proper knowledge of seafloor geomorphology is key to several purposes, including maritime spatial planning, habitat mapping or geohazard assessment for offshore infrastructure and coastal areas, to name a few.
In this session, we welcome a wide range of contributions aimed at exploring the causes and consequences of geomorphic processes shaping continental margins at variable spatio-temporal scale. In addition, we strongly encourage multidisciplinary contributions dealing with the evolution of continental margins characterized by a
complex morphology as well as integrated offshore-onshore geomorphological studies.

Conveners:
Fabiano Gamberi, Istituto di Scienze Marine, CNR, Bologna, Italy, fabiano.gamberi@bo.ismar.cnr.it, (lead convener)
Adam McArthur, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, UK
Cornel Olariu, Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas, Austin, USA
Salvatore Distefano, Dipartimento di Scienze biologiche, geologiche e ambientali, Università di Catania, Italy

Scientific theme: 2E: Geomorphology and stratal architecture of continental margins

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: The shelf edge is an important oceanographic environment, which at all times during the different parts of a cycle of sea-level variation is a fundamental boundary between distinct physiographic domains. For most of its life, it is the boundary between relatively shallow-water areas of the continental shelf and the deep-water continental slope. However, for a short time, during the lowstand, as it happened repeatedly during Quaternary, it is the site of the transition between continental and marine environments and may host the coastline. Hence, the shelf-edge is a highly dynamic setting and is fundamental in determining the evolution of continental margins. In this session, we encourage contributions that illustrate the dynamic aspect of the shelf edge and its importance for researches in Earth Sciences disciplines. In particular, we encourage contributions that address: the role of the shelf edge in the transfer of sediment, organic matter and pollutants to the deep sea; the character of sedimentary deposits formed in relation with the shelf edge and their importance as reservoirs for exploitable materials or storage; the role of tectonics and oceanographic processes in controlling the environment at the shelf edge; the potential of the shelf-edge stratigraphy as a record of past climatic regimes and changes; the analysis of geo-hazards associated with processes occurring at the shelf edge; the environmental evolution of the shelf edge
and its influence on biodiversity.

2F- Karst process, deposits, landforms, and landscape

Conveners:
Radu Iovita, Center for the Study of Human Origins, New York University, New York, USA Early Prehistory and Quaternary Ecology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, iovita@nyu.edu, (lead convener)
Dominic Stratford, School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Aristeidis Varis, Early Prehistory and Quaternary Ecology, University of Tübingen, Germany

Scientific theme: 2F: Karst process, deposits, landforms, and landscape

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Karstic features, such as caves and rockshelters, are among some of the most important sources of information about prehistoric humans and their behaviours. Karst processes, such as generational epikarst modification through temporally and spatially variable recharge dynamics and hypogene and epigene karstification and rekarstification processes, are heavily influenced by local and regional geological, geomorphological and environmental conditions, and create dynamic depositional environments that can result in the formation or deletion of rich palaeoanthropologically-informative autogenic and allogenic assemblages.
Frequently, these processes modify, through selective mobilisation and preservation, components or entire deposits, fundamentally affecting the integrity of the body of evidence and consequently our capacity to interpret behavioural and biological proxies. These processes can severely limit integration of environmental, biological and cultural proxies, and, at the landscape scale, inhibit broad inter-site comparative analyses. This session aims to discuss, in a global perspective, karst processes and their effect on the archaeological and palaeoanthropological record in order to identify major trends across landscapes and time periods. Through these discussions, we hope to foster suites of analytical tools that draw on geological, geomorphological and geoarchaeological resources,
enabling the effects of these processes to be better recognised and controlled.

Conveners:
Laura Sanna, CNR-IGAG, Italy, laura.sanna@igag.cnr.it, (lead convener) Marco Zedda, Sassari University, Italy
Daniel Zoboli, Cagliari University, Italy

Scientific theme: 2F: Karst process, deposits, landforms, and landscape

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Caves are excellent sediment traps and, thanks to the highly fossiliferous content of many cave deposits, they are very precious sedimentary environments for Quaternary paleontological studies. As poorly affected by erosive processes, cave sediments are a very effective tool for zooarcheological investigation in continental settings, providing very precise dating and good paleoenvironmental clues about the relationships between cave faunal remains, often rare at the Earth surface, and Quaternary climate. These paleontological archives are indispensable paleobiodiversity records in developing sustainable mitigation actions for current biodiversity conservation, especially in hotspot areas such as the Mediterranean realm. Although caves are often a complex environment for fossilization processes and for preserving bone remains, the descriptive and taphonomic researches on cave faunistic content can allow to establish past taxa associations and their evolution over time. This session focuses on the many aspects related to Quaternary cave vertebrate documentation and it is open to contributions from multidisciplinary studies, such as the reliability of cave deposits for recording paleobiological information of extinct species, challenges in deciphering taphonomic factors, clues on prehistoric human dietary habits, and including general reviews on the importance of cave deposits for the definition of the regional zoogeographical evolution of
the Mediterranean area during last 2.6 Ma.

Conveners:
Mike Rogerson, Northumbria University, UK, michael.rogerson@northumbria.ac.uk, (lead convener) Tebogo Makhubela, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
Robyn Pickering, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Monika Markowska, Max Planck institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany Patrick Randolph-Quinney, Northumbria University, UK

Scientific theme: 2F: Karst process, deposits, landforms, and landscape

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Hydroclimate change in regions which are today arid or semi-arid provide some of the most celebrated cases of Quaternary environmental change, and some of the most pressing examples of human populations made vulnerable by anthropogenic climate change. Dry continental areas also present some of the most challenging regions for Quaternary science, with the paucity of continuous sedimentary records, combined with the low organic content of those that are present, making dating and environmental reconstruction exceptionally difficult. That is, except where caves and karst are present. The unparalleled preservation of past climate variability evidenced by speleothems, tufa, travertine and cave sediments mean that, where geological conditions are conducive, the dryland Quaternary record is a rapidly growing field. Established research on hominins and their temporal and environmental context, particularly in South Africa, has proven the importance of dryland caves and karst. Ongoing development in speleothem palaeoclimatology in African, Asian, American and Australian dryland caves are proving instrumental in elucidating long-standing questions in hydroclimate variability in the poorly- understood arid mid-latitudes.
This session will bring a diverse group of research and researchers together to explore the progress being made in this global exploration, and pool experience and expertise to accelerate progress in future projects. Any talk or poster concerning palaeoclimate or palaeontological / archaeological research within karst or cave environments in any global dryland is welcome. Prominence will be given to emerging projects and early career researchers, which will address long-standing data gaps in time and / or space. We particularly welcome presentations from researchers from countries not usually represented at International meetings, and urge established teams to
include their local collaborators in a meaningful way.

3- Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

Conveners:
Davide Susini, National Research Council (CNR) – Institute of Environmental Geology and Geoengineering (IGAG), Italy, davide.susini@igag.cnr.it, (lead convener)
Luca Forti, Department of Earth Sciences “Ardito Desio”, University of Milan, Milan, Italy Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources of the Italian National Research Council, Pisa, Italy
Jaafar Jotheri, Department of Archaeology, University of Al Qadisiyah, Ad Dīwānīyah, Iraq Julia Meister, Institute of Geography and Geology, University of Würzburg, Germany

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History, SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Over the last two decades, geoarchaeology has significantly benefited from the increased overlap in the scales of interpretation of earth sciences and archaeology. This enabled the possibility of examining several geoarchaeological issues using complementary investigative methods at a varying resolution scale. This multi- scalar approach, defined by Butzer (2008) as “scale-switching, from the large to the small and back”, provides links between landscape (remote sensing) and site stratigraphy (micro-analysis), which significantly enhance the interpretative potential of studying human responses and adaptation to climate, landscapes, ecosystems, and natural resources availability in different regions of our planet. As such, this session seeks inter- and multi- disciplinary contributions that deploy geoarchaeological approaches and tools to address the complex and embedded relationship between past landscape evolution, geomorphological processes, human impact, system response, and issues of landscape resilience and human land use during the Quaternary. Contributions should encompass innovative methods or cutting-edge research at different spatial and temporal scales, from site to landscape-level reconstructions and short to long term occupations. Approaches that effectively tether multi-scalar methods are encouraged.

Conveners:
Angela A. Bruch, ROCEEH Research Centre, Senckenberg Research Institute, Frankfurt/M, Germany, abruch@senckenberg.de, (lead convener)
Karen Hahn, Institute for Ecology, Evolution and Diversity, Goethe University, Frankfurt/M, Germany

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: Plants always played an important role in human life since the beginning of human evolution serving as food, raw material, fuel, medicine etc. Although fossil remains of plants usually are rarely preserved in archeological contexts, it is undisputed that early humans pursued a flexible and diverse nutritional strategy to meet their needs for energy and nutrients. The exploitation of useful wild plants, also beyond their use as food, became more effective with developing cultural capacities, which changed considerably through time with respect to the use of tools and fire, and especially the capability to process and store plant materials.
Besides human capacities, the availability of useful plants for different hominin groups also strongly depends on environmental factors such as climate and topography. Those factors are subject to considerable spatial and temporal variety, which influence vegetation and biodiversity and makes environmental change a driver for early plant exploitation.
Within this session we want to explore the dependence of early human plant use on Pleistocene environmental and cultural changes. Both, oral and poster contributions on the availability of useful wild plants in different environmental settings and for different groups of humans are highly welcome. Studies may cover environmental as well as archaeo- or ethnobotanical issues; they may investigate the impact of vegetation dynamics, climatic or cultural changes, or their interplay.

Conveners:
Arina M. Khatsenovich, School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, khatsenovich@arizona.edu (lead convener)
Byambaa Gunchinsuren, Institute of Archaeology, Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Mongolia

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: During critical stages of ancient human history, subsistence strategies changed dramatically under the impact of natural and, to a greater extent, anthropogenic factors. Some such critical stages have already been explored as technological revolutions, including the emergence of the Upper Paleolithic, Neolithic, and others. However, recent achievements in archaeology, paleogenetics and allied paleoecological subdisciplines have identified additional critical stages that were not previously known: Denisovan migrations to the Russian Altai and the highlands of Tibet, two distinct Neanderthal movements into North and Central Asia, the migration of anatomically modern humans to North and Central Asia, significant depopulation apparent during the LGM, and the settling of anatomically modern humans in extreme ecological niches in Asia.
We seek to understand human adaptative strategies, methods of resource utilization and the degree and nature of changing material culture and basic lifestyles of human groups in the shifting environments of North and Central Asia during the Middle-Upper Paleolithic, roughly 300,000-12,000 years ago. This topic covers all perspectives on the impact of nature on humans, aspects of human-animal interactions, human use of mineral and organic resources, and reconstructions of changes in the living strategies of ancient human populations during critical
stages of prehistory, such as significant changes in the subsistence strategies employed by paleopopulations.

Conveners:
Anubhav Preet Kaur, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali, India, anubhavpreetk@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Shashi B. Mehra, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali, India Vivek Singh, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali, India

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: South Asia, encompassing different geographical and geological regions, acted as an important dispersal corridor for fauna and hominins. This region has reported evidence of continuous human occupations from ~1.5 Ma to the present across diverse geological landscapes. Scholars have also postulated a possibility of an even older hominin occupation from the region. However, very little is known about the human-animal-environment interface from the region. Only recently have scholars started to explore the effect of past ecological changes and climate on the spatial and temporal dynamics of hominin occupation. However, still much remains to be done in this respect. This session invites presentations broadly focusing on understanding the human-animal-environment interface in the Quaternary period of South Asia.
1. Methodological and theoretical approaches towards integrating the palaeoecological and archaeological datasets.
2. The effect of past ecological changes on spatial and temporal dynamics of human occupations in South Asia.
3. Human adaptations to diverse South Asian ecozones.
4. Exploring the possibility of using non-stone raw material for making tools.
5. Understanding human-animal interactions through rockart.
6. Causes and effects of faunal extinctions and turnovers during the Quaternary.
7. Taphonomic evidence of human-faunal interactions.
Local and regional studies pertaining to the aforementioned topics are welcomed for the session.

Conveners:
Miriam Belmaker, The University of Tulsa, USA, Miriam-belmaker@utulsa.edu, (lead convener)
Hugues-Alexandre Blain, Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social (IPHES-CERCA), Spain; Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain hablain@iphes.cat
Alon Barash Azrieli Faculty of Medicine, Bar Ilan University, P.O.B 1589, Safed 1311502. Israel. Alon.Barash@biu.ac.il

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: This session seeks to discuss the role played in human evolution by climate and its fluctuations on the fundamental niche and behavioral plasticity of early Homo that led to out-of-Africa dispersal and global colonization during the early Pleistocene. While global–scale climatic trends are well documented for the Pleistocene, resolving global patterns to local scales remains a challenge. Evidence for global climate change is often incongruent with local paleoclimate and environmental evidence. Ecological, environmental, and climatic proxies in East Africa and Eurasia before and after the first dispersals have produced conflicting results regarding the degree of landscape composition, climate, and seasonality hindering our ability to consider the environmental contributions to early Pleistocene dispersals more fully. We specifically wish to discuss complementary, multidisciplinary proxies derived from different methodologies and applied to disparate biotic taxonomic and ecological groups as well as a range of abiotic proxies. This broad approach will facilitate a more nuanced scale understanding of local versus global environments during the early Pleistocene and refine our paleoenvironmental interpretations, verifying observed climatic interpretations across different spatial and temporal scales to answer this critical question in quaternary sciences.

Conveners:
Amel Chakroun, Department of Geology, Faculty of Sciences de Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, Manar II, Tunisia, chakrounamel2@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Larbi Boudad, Department of Geology, Faculty of Sciences, University Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco Abderrezak Djerrab, University 08 Mai 1945 de Guelma, Algeria

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: The results and outstanding issues, related to the different axes of the quaternary stratigraphy, geomorphology, chronology, paleoclimatology, tectonic, paleontology and anthropology have been widely studied in North Africa.
The methodological progress in absolute chronology applied to the different axes of study allow for crucial interpretations, leading to the establishment of a precise stratigraphic framework and the reconstruction of the Quaternary paleoenvironments.
When applied to various fields of Quaternary research, accurate and absolute chronology data reveals more precise and detailed layouts of the continental deposits, the marine terraces and the associated faunal and anthropic content .
Correlations of the new results along the Mediterranean and Atlantic quaternary palaeoshores will be discussed. A special focus will be placed on paleoanthropology.
This session will be an opportunity to discuss and expose local outcomes, hopefully leading to more global
conclusions on the Maghreb level.

Conveners:
Arjun Rao, Assistant Professor, Dept. of History and Archaeology, Central University of Karnataka, India, arjunrao@cuk.ac.in, (lead convener)
Vishi Upadhyay, Curatorial Associate, Bihar Museum, Patna, India

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Land use and Landscape modifications in and around the archaeological sites (of Pleistocene and Holocene periods) have threatened the original geo-settings of the site. The vivid scale of the site formation process is influential either due to local environmental conditions, successive cultural occupations (multi-period sites), or through irrational site conservation approaches (for example, Buddhist sites of South Asia or the castles in Europe). This session focuses on; 1) Accessing on-site landscape modifications/altered trajectories through natural events such as floods, landslides, river channel shifts, and river dried-up. 2) Advancements made by the succeeding cultural occupations in making the multi-period site more functional and re-defining the settlement patterns on the advent of early urbanisation. 3) Examining flaws in the conservation of archaeological sites that have systematically alienated local geo contexts; by developing site museums, theme parks, and courtyards. This panel welcomes researches conducted in landscape and land use studies assessing such impacts on the sites
across the world.

Conveners:
Juzhi Hou, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China, houjz@itpcas.ac.cn, (lead convener)
Xiaoyan Yang, Lanzhou University, China Hassan fazeli Nashli, University of Tehran, Iran

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The trajectory and patterns of human-environment interaction in the past is a widely concerned issue. Climate and environment change have greatly impacted and shaped human evolution, spatial distributions and societal developments in the past, while fundamental technological innovations and their subsequent diffusion, and tans-regional cultural exchange, might have significantly improved human ability to adapt to various habitats, and human impact on natural environment. The Ancient Silk Roads, which play important roles in trans-Eurasia exchange during both historical and prehistoric times, developed between Europe and East Asia, a vast region of highly diverse in climate, environment, and ecology. Climatic patterns across ancient Silk Road have varied substantially throughout the Holocene. The dynamics of glacial advances and associated melt waters, changing rain-shadow effects, and shifting oases, contributed to the emergence of a trans-continental cultural exchange that laid the foundation for the formation of the ancient Silk Road. This major corridor of exchange linked the agricultural centers of Eurasia starting in the third millennium BCE and intensifying with the formal establishment of trade routes between the second century BCE and the sixteenth century CE. Over the past few years, inter- disciplinary research and novel methods have expanded our understanding of the archaeology and paleoecology of Central Eurasia. The aim of this session is to provide an open platform for scientists to discuss the history of climate change, human cultural development, and human-environment interaction across the ancient Silk Roads in
historical and prehistoric times.

Conveners:
Hülya Caner, Istanbul University, the Institute of Marine Sciences and management, Department of Marine Geology, Turkey, hcaner@istanbul.edu.tr, (lead convener)
Bikem Ekberzade, Istanbul Technical University, Eurasia Institute of Earth Sciences, Turkey
Nurgül Karlıoğlu Kılıç, Istanbul University-Cerrahpaşa, Department of Forest Botany, İstanbul, Turkey.

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Eastern Mediterranean Basin has not only been home to some of the earliest known human civilizations, but its residents witnessed some of the world’s biggest and most impressive empires. Having thus been inhabited for milenia, it’s one of the regions where the human influence is almost omnipresent in shaping its ecosystems, and numerous researches have been and are being made on this subject. Several studies have shown the effects of anthropogenic pressure on biodiversity in the Mediterranean ecosystems such as the decimation of the forest ranges. While polen records tell us a time where Cedrus libani L. formed lush forests, rich and abundant with wildlife as described in ancient texts, its economic value has become its death sentence, its thick bark being used in shipbuilding during the Roman times. Today we can identify human induced paleo-deforestation and resolve the anthropogenic effects, past and future, on ecosystems by means of scientific methods. In this session we welcome all research on the anthropogenic effects on terrestrial ecosystems, especially on deforestation and biome shifts,
your findings on transition, adaptation and migration of species.

Conveners:
Alison Pereira, University Paris-Saclay, Laboratoire GEOPS, France, alison.pereira@universite-paris-saclay.fr, (lead convener)
Maïlys Richard, CENIEH, Spain

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: This session addresses the complexity of establishing precise chronological frameworks for Palaeolithic sites worldwide and framing them confidently with well-dated environmental and climatic contexts. Assessing the chronology of a site is essential to interpret archaeological assemblages and compare them with similar records from a techno-cultural or anthropological perspective. Indeed, each dating method is characterized by inherent methodological or geological issues that limit their scope of application and comparison for common stratigraphies. For this reason, the development of cross-dating applications is crucial. This session aims to present multidisciplinary approaches that were successfully applied to archaeological sites and improved the current knowledge of the most commonly used dating methods in Pleistocene environments (40Ar/39Ar, tephrochronology, ESR, ESR, U-series, TL, OSL, 14C…). We also encourage studies that present the precise synchronization and correlation of Palaeolithic sites with regional climatic and environmental records dated using
the same geochronological approaches.

Conveners:
Ibouraïma Yabi, Department of Geography and Regional Planning, University of Abomey-Calavi, Benin, ibouraima.yabi@flash.uac.bj / yafid2@yahoo.fr, (lead convener)
Olugbenga A. Boboye, Department of Geology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Monique G. Tossou, Botany and Plant Ecology Laboratory, University of Abomey-Calavi, Benin

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: The latest IPCC reports (2019, 2021 and 2022) confirm that climate change is taking shape on a global scale with multiple environmental and socioeconomic consequences. They recall the urgency of adaptation and resilience measures, especially for West African countries considered to be very vulnerable.
However, in the past, the world in general and West Africa in particular has already experienced climate changes. Thus, during 2.56 Ma corresponding to the Quaternary period, there was a succession of glacial and interglacial phases. These phases were materialized in West Africa by a succession of wet periods and periods of drought or aridity. These various climatic changes have had hydrological, biogeographical, ecological, etc. to which human societies have adapted in different ways.
It therefore appears necessary to better understand, using new methods, paleo-climatic mutations, their environmental signals and the responses provided by human communities. This knowledge will help guide decision-making in the direction of climate-adapted development of territories in the context of future climate change announced. The presence session will offer the various specialists geologists, botanists, geographers, archaeologists, historians etc. having worked on West Africa to take stock of the results obtained and to identify
prospects.

Conveners:
Marina Morlock, Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Sweden, marina.morlock@umu.se, (lead convener)
Tobias Schneider, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia Climate School, USA
Doreen Yu-Tuan Huang, Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Sweden

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Recent developments in the analysis of biomarkers (lipids, photo-pigments, sterols, etc.) and DNA extracted from soils, peats, speleothems, and sediments enable unique insights into the history of terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Examples include the study of long-term biodiversity change, microbial element cycling, organic matter composition, and environmental variables (pH, temperature, moisture sources). Molecular techniques further offer a differentiated view on the climate-environment-human nexus through investigation of leads/lags in specific proxies resolving cultivated plants, domestic animals, industrial activity, and climate.
However, basic aspects of the source-transport-sink processes, and the taphonomy of biomolecules in these systems remain sometimes obscure. Additionally, the complexity of the samples extracted from natural archives challenge researchers in their interpretation and understanding.
Therefore, our session aims at gathering biogeochemists, geomicrobiologists, and paleo-researchers applying lipid biomarkers and/or DNA analysis to different natural archives. We particularly encourage submissions that target analytical and interpretative challenges and advances when using biomolecules for paleo-environmental reconstructions as well as the presentation of novel analytical approaches (non-destructive, and destructive) and
data analysis (machine learning, AI) that reveal the future direction of this scientific field.

Conveners:
Prabhin Sukumaran, Charotar University of Science and Technology, Changa, India, dr.prabhin@gmail.com, (lead convener)

Co-Convener 2: Parth R. Chauhan, IISER Mohali, India.

Christine Hertler, ROCEEH Research Center, Senckenberg Research Institute, Germany

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: This session focuses on diverse topics, methods, and perspectives related to Quaternary humans interacting with their environment(s). The study of human-environmental relationships has moved beyond merely linking empirical discoveries in recent years, now constituting a dominant research topic in paleoanthropology.
Analyses and reconstructions encompass specific subsistence strategies, ecological and climatic adaptations, dynamic land-use patterns, occupations of specific refugia, raw material exploitation and transport behaviours, faunal and floral exploitation, and symbolic behaviour, among others. Current research projects and recent discoveries are addressing a suite of critical questions such as the scavenging-hunting debate, factors of lithic technological innovation, environmental changes and dispersals, the impact of extreme events such as volcanic eruptions on Quaternary ecologies, fauna, and hominins, anthropogenic-climatic factors for specific megafauna extinctions and the role of environmental instability on human evolution. This session aims to engage researchers working on diverse time periods and across different parts of Africa and Eurasia to address multifaceted research issues. Empirical, theoretical, and conceptual papers are welcome, including informed perspectives on methodological approaches and limitations, hypothesis-building, decolonization and deconstruction, inter-and intra-regional comparisons of varied datasets, palaeoenvironmental reconstructions through varied proxies, and future suggested research directions to fill specific geographic, temporal and thematic gaps in regional
paleoanthropological records.

Conveners:
Aayush Srivastava, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of St Andrews, UK, aayushgeo@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Filippo Brandolini, School of History, Classics and Archaeology, Newcastle University, UK
Guido Mariani, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Italy

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: The Late Quaternary is distinctive compared to earlier geological times, because of how humans started altering the natural environment for their needs and survival. Increase in human populations, intensification of agriculture, domestication of crops and animals, and significant migrations caused profound landscape changes. Interdisciplinary research is essential to understanding and reconstructing the complex interplay of these human and landscape interactions. Furthermore, as developing more sustainable land use practices is increasingly representing a challenge and urgent global venture, sustained collaboration among experts from diverse fields of research is even more necessary to deal with this complex global emergency. Here, geoarchaeology can actively contribute to this movement by exploring the interactions of social and environmental systems over long periods of time and generating insights for potential future applications. The session seeks related interdisciplinary contributions that use novel approaches and tools to address human and landscape interactions during the Late Quaternary, which could range from broad themes of paleoenvironmental changes and landscape use to more specific topics focusing on a particular geographical region, geomorphological features or land use practices. The session would discuss these contributions to understand and suggest how the geoarchaeological data could be
used to inform sustainable practices for present-day landscape use.

Conveners:
Elke Zeller, IBS Center for Climate Physics, Korea, elkezeller@pusan.ac.kr, (lead convener) Ariane Burke, Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research
Jiaoyang Ruan, IBS Center for Climate Physics, Korea

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: It has long been speculated that climate shifts may have played an essential role in the evolution of our genus, Homo. However, identifying and quantifying the impact of climatic and environmental changes on human speciation, migration, and cultural development has proven extremely difficult.
In this session, we will bring together scientists from various disciplines, including paleoanthropology, archaeology, evolutionary ecology, geology, and paleoclimatology, to discuss new ideas and methods that can be applied to the study of past climate shifts and their influence on human evolution. We are interested in novel syntheses of existing datasets and encourage contributions that shed new light on this longstanding question using statistical, biogeographic, dynamic, or agent-based modeling approaches.

Conveners:
Rosalia Gallotti, Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, CNRS, UMR 5140 Archéologie des Sociétés Méditerranéennes and LabEx Archimède, Montpellier, France, rosalia.gallotti@univ-montp3.fr, (lead convener) Camille Daujeard, Histoire Naturelle de l’Homme Préhistorique (HNHP), CNRS, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne Université, UPVD, Institut de Paléontologie Humaine, Paris, France

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Over the last two decades, research on the Acheulean multiplied in the African continent and Near East, increasing our knowledge and stimulating new debates.
The chronostratigraphic framework in which Acheulean emerges and develops has been improved and lithic analyses reveal the complex scenario of its origin and the diversity and variability of the technical behaviors between 1.8 and 1.3 Ma. In this time span, some faunal assemblages evidence meat and fat consumption, which in these cases implies less competition with carnivores and large game procurement. However, much remains unknown about what triggered the emergence of the African Acheulean in different bio-geographic regions.
Conversely, the development of the African Acheulean after 1.3 Ma is documented by a limited number of sites, several with a low-resolution chronostratigraphy, and no or scarce faunal remains associated. In addition, cut marked bones are very few, most of them suffering from a lack of taphonomic and contextual studies. This scarcity of data is particularly unfortunate, because during this period some of the major changes in human bio-cultural evolution occur.
The main aim of this session, at the crossroads of several disciplines, is to bring together researchers currently working on the Early/early Middle Pleistocene Acheulean sites in Africa and Near East. Presentations could include case studies at particular sites up to broader regional or continental responses.

Conveners:
Peter Adegbenga Adeonipekun, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria, p1adeonipekun@yahoo.com, (lead convener) Emuobosa Orijemie, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Ayobami Oyelami, GEC Energy Solutions, Lagos, Nigeria

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The Quaternary represents a period of human evolution and spread, rapid oscillations in climate and sea-level resulting in alterations in global environments. As a result of comparatively optimum preservation of its sediments and similarity in its environments and geology to the Present, the Quaternary constitutes one of the most studied geological records. Some of the latest estimates indicate that the African continent is one of the most vulnerable to climate change.
Prediction of changes in future climate requires good knowledge of past changes and their causative factors. Integrating the past knowledge with the present will help greatly in predicting future changes and their consequences. Palaeontological records from the African tropics are key to understanding past changes in the climate system and the sensitivity of tropical regions to present and future climate. However, there are needs for improvement on the development of climate reconstruction methods and models by promoting the multi-proxy datasets which will ensure wide application of climate reconstruction technique in the region.
The need to identify the strengths and weaknesses in the region’s Quaternary research and provide suggestions for future studies has generated interests among early carrier researchers (ECRs) whose foci include archaeology, palaeontology (palynology), palaeoenvironments, coastal erosion, past climatic and sea level changes of the West- Central African sub-region.
We seek contributions that apply inter- and multidisciplinary approaches to improving or broadening our understanding of major Quaternary events, their timing, impacts on hominin and human evolution and migration, and how past societies coped with climatic variability within an environmental context. We welcome studies, in the broadest sense, that determine drivers, magnitude, and rate of change of different components of past environmental and human-environmental systems, archaeological and ecological models, within the Quaternary. This session aims to further stimulate collaborative opportunities and avenues for participants from the region.
Participants will be expected from West-Central Africa.

Conveners:
Anupama Krishnamurthy, French Institute of Pondicherry, India, anupama.k@ifpindia.org, (lead convener) Shanti Pappu, Sharma Centre for Heritage Education and Visiting Professor, SIAS, Krea University, India Peter Langdon, University of Southampton, UK
Kathleen Morrison, University of Pennsylvania, USA Aliyu Adamu Isa, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
Kumar Akhilesh, Sharma Centre for Heritage Education, India

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: The Anthropocene Working Group’s (AWG) report of 21st May 2019 situated the “Anthropocene”, at ~ mid 20th Century CE, formalizing the term as the start of the process of physical accumulation of artificial radionuclides in the geological strata worldwide. Debates on these definitions raise other queries (see Ruddiman 2018, Bonneuil & Fresoz 2013/ 2016, Yousoff 2017, 2018), while archaeologists/historians, pause at drawing sharp boundaries in the mid-20th century with a longer perspective on human-environment interrelationships. Today, when human imprints on the environment are at a critical stage, such debates on the Anthropocene from diverse perspectives are of significance for investigating processes in time and space. Debates that bring together diverse disciplines within the Quaternary are key today when the world is at a critical juncture socially and environmentally. This session seeks to gather together a diversity of researchers who have been working to understand these relationships at local, regional and global scales to address key questions around
human/environment interactions within the Quaternary.

Conveners:
Elizabeth Solleiro Rebolledo, Instituto de Geología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico (lead convener)
Fabio Scarciglia, Università della Calabria, Italy

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: This session invites contributions dealing with soils and paleosols as a memory of environmental change and man-landscape interactions. The session will be focused on paleopedology-based environmental reconstructions applying both traditional and innovative methods. Special attention will be given to studies based on micromorphology as one of the key tools to understand soil processes and their time sequences, to discriminate lithological inheritance, pedofeatures related to different stages of pedogenesis and their diagenetic alteration. Traditional case studies of paleosols within the different epochs and (paleo)geographic contexts, regional, global, and retrospective analysis of paleosols and related environmental changes, integration of paleosol data into multiproxy reconstructions are welcome. Contributions on soils and soil-sedimentary sequences under human impact and in an archaeological context in particular that imprint man-landscape interactions in the past
are also invited.

Conveners:
Marco Peresani, Department of Humanities, University of Ferrara, Italy, marco.peresani@unife.it, (lead convener) Federica Badino, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geoengineering, National Council of Research, Milano, Italy
Federica Fontana, Department of Humanities, University of Ferrara, Italy
Andreas Maier, Institute of Prehistoric Archaeology, University of Cologne, Germany
Giovanni Monegato, Institute of Geosciences and Georesources, National Council of Research, Padova, Italy Cosimo Posth, Institute for Archaeological Sciences, Archaeo- and Palaeogenetics, University of Tübingen, Germany

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The Late Pleistocene and early Holocene in Europe experienced pronounced changes in climate, landscape and ecological contexts leading to complex turnovers in the culture and biology of Homo sapiens hunter-gatherers. To what extent the sudden and repeated shifts occurred in geography and ecology influenced human peopling in Western Eurasia and the Mediterranean rim is a topic of long-standing debate. The session aims to discuss in a multi-disciplinary ground results achieved from original focuses on human-ecological relations. The time frame is that of the first arrival of modern humans 50ka bearers of the early Upper Palaeolithic cultures up the end of the Mesolithic before the Neolithic demic revolution. Original data, reviews, and models raised from a range of Quaternary, Biological and Archaeological Sciences will be debated to assess whether environmental conditions acted or not as a deterministic factor on our biological history and past cultural adaptations across the
last glacial-postglacial period (MIS3-MIS1).

Conveners:
Iddir Amara, Institut d’archéologie – université Alger 2, Algérie, amara_iddir@yahoo.fr, (lead convener) Amel Chakroun, Université des Sciences de Tunis, Tunisie
Kahina Roumane, Institut d’archéologie – Alger 2, Algérie
Alejandra Calderón Ordóñez, Université de la Laguna, Tenerife, Spain Thomas Perrin, UMR 5608 Traces – CNRS, France
Isabelle Sidera, UMR 5607 Ausonius – CNRS, France

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The period between late Pleistocene and middle Holocene has recorded changes in human societies in North Africa and the Island as such they experienced several major changes in relation to their landscape, anthropobiological and cultural environments.
The last oscillations of the climatic optimum and the post-glacial warming have led to the change of the sea level, the paleogeography and the biocenosis. During the holocene, the behavior of human groups towards the climate changes and the new paleolandcape displayed multidirectional migratory movements recording the gradual transition between the ancestral practices of hunter-gatherers and the agropastoral life.
The complex relationship between the climate changes and the migration of the different prehistoric groups in
North Africa between the southern Mediterranean shore and the Atlas mountain range will be discussed.

Conveners:
Laura Longo, DAIS, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, laura.longo@unive.it, (lead convener)
Robert Sala-Ramo, IPHES, The Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution, Tarragona, Spain
M. Gema Chacón, IPHES, The Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution, Tarragona, Spain
Amèlia Bargalló, IPHES, The Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution, Tarragona, Spain
Deborah Barsky, IPHES, The Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution, Tarragona, Spain
Bruno Gómez, IPHES, The Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution, Tarragona, Spain

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The Session is devoted to the large community that deals with lithic industry and the related topics regarding landscaping the resources (mineral, animal and plants) across the time and the space of the Pleistocene. The large Eurasian continent is the scenario where many of the events occurred in terms of human evolution and the discoveries of the last twenty years mark a crucial role played by the territories out of western Eurasia. The vivid debate on the hominins “pathways” while migrating into Eurasia during the Pleistocene is fueled by a range of dispersals models that are changing in pace with novel data such as: the emergence of a new human fossil or the recording of a new genome, indicating the complexity of Pleistocene hunter-gatherer interactions with climate, environment, resources availability and the technological strategies they used for an efficient and skilled exploitation. Across the northern hemisphere, hominins encountered a wide range of environments, from flat plains to mountainous territories. They confronted different climates, sourced a variety of lithic raw materials, and exploited a wide range of biotic resources for different goals, further than dietary purposes. The rapidly-growing applications of STEM to the different evidences unfold the potential of the microscale and the molecular analyses illustrate the rich diversity of past human actions helping to discern patterns of expedient and selective activities, disclosing both learning and doing capacities. Microarchaeology and paleogenetic represent key-breakthroughs that are providing with data to a totally different questions about humans mingling and mating and for their complex patterns of movements, whilst recent developments of environmental DNA are promising to freeing from the limits imposed by the bone remains retrieval. There are still open questions to disentangle the complex interplay between biology, environment and technological strategies that brought to the present peopling of the earth. We are welcoming scholars involved in the debate raised by the studies on these different scenarios to contribute their reasoning on traits and behaviors interplay.

Conveners:
Redzhep Kurbanov, Institute of History, Archaeology and Ethnography, Tajik National Academy of Sciences, Tajikistan, roger.kurbanov@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Jan-Pieter Buylaert, Technical University of Denmark, Riso, Denmark David Wright, University of Oslo, Norway
Thomas Stevens, University of Uppsala, Sweden Mads Knudsen, Aarhus University, Denmark

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: This cross-disciplinary session will bring together specialists from different fields of Quaternary Sciences for understanding exciting history of human occupation of Central Asia during global and regional climate change and landscape dynamics. Central Asia is a key route for human expansion into Asia. In recent years new important results were obtained for establishing chronology, reconstructing paleogeographic conditions and studying the material culture of the early stages of human history in the central part of Eurasia. During the work of this session studies of new available archaeological sites and data on the Early and Middle Paleolithic of Central Asia, the patterns and direction of the initial human colonization of this region, climate change, geomorphological evolution and developments in regional stratigraphy will be presented, including results obtained from the THOCA
international project.

Conveners:
Fahu Chen, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China, fhchen@itpcas.ac.cn, (lead convener)
Dongju Zhang, College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China

Scientific theme: 3: Quaternary environments and Human evolution: fossil record, phylogeny, palaeobiology, palaeoecology and cultural models

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: Undisputed evidence of modern humans and modern human behaviors in East Asia started to appear about 40 ka BP, while some disputed evidence from South China came out as early 100 ka BP. Before the rose of modern humans, archaic humans including Denisovans with diverse morphological traits and behaviors dispersed widely in East Asia. It is still uncertain whether modern humans displaced the regional archaic humans or descended from them in this region. Compared to limited human fossils, rich archaeological remains may provide more about the relationships between these two big groups. No matter it was transition or shift, it happened in a period with highly fluctuated environment which could enormously affect the density and distribution of various resources that are critical for human life. To survive, both archaic and modern humans had to develop special adaptation strategies. By analyzing the behavioral traits and environment background, we may get some important clues of this part of human history.
In this session, we’d like to present the environment background of archaic and modern humans from the late Middle Pleistocene to Late Pleistocene, human behavior traits represented by lithic analysis, zooarchaeological studies and so on, and traits of human fossils in East Asia. We aim to provide a platform for researchers from multidiscipline to discuss what did happen between the archaic and modern humans during the late Middle Pleistocene and the Pleistocene in East Asia.

3A- Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

Conveners:
Christopher J. Bae, Department of Anthropology, University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA, cjbae@hawaii.edu, (lead convener)
Hanlie Hong, Key Laboratory of Geobiology and Environmental Geology, Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences, China
Zhongping Lai, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Disaster Prediction and Prevention, Institute of Marine Science, Shantou University, China

Scientific theme: 3A: Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Up until fairly recently, humans have been impacted tremendously by paleoenvironmental changes. Indeed, early hominin dispersals and distributions were at the whim of a constantly changing environment. Here, we present a series of papers that investigate this impact on Quaternary hominins in eastern Asia. Key questions we will be able to address in this session are: 1) What types of paleoenvironmental barriers/corridors that hominins might have encountered were created in the region during different stages of the Quaternary? 2) May we be able to identify first and last appearing datums of early hominins in the region and link these data to changes in the paleoenvironment? 3) How do our changing views of the paleoenvironment and geochronology influence our views of human evolution in eastern Asia? 4) To what extent did these hominins survive in the region (e.g., continuity) or were there constant die-offs, followed by new arrivals of different hominin groups (e.g., replacements)? These questions are particularly pertinent now as the earliest arrival of hominins in eastern Asia currently dates back to close to the onset of the Quaternary, a time period that encompassed dozens of glacial/interglacial fluctuation cycles. The papers presented in this session should appear as a special issue of a
leading peer-reviewed journal.

Conveners:
Deepak Kumar Jha, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany, jha@shh.mpg.de, (lead convener)
Robert Patalano, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany Patrick Roberts, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany Jana Ilgner, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany
Michael Petraglia, Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution (ARCHE), Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia

Scientific theme: 3A: Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Molecular proxies and stable isotopes are advancing the ways in which we understand the role climatic and environmental variability had in shaping past human behavioural, morphological,
and technological adaptations. The application of novel lipid biomarker proxies and compound- specific isotope analysis (CSIA; δ 2 H and δ 13 C) in archaeological research now grants us the ability to explore multiple angles of human-environment interactions in the past, such as plant ecology and water availability (plant waxes) and fire history (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), Levoglucosan).
In this session, we invite papers focused on the use of biomarkers, and stable isotope analysis of those biomarkers with a particular focus on Pleistocene archaeological and palaeontological sites and in wider regionally-relevant contexts (e.g., in closely associated lake or marine cores). Our focus is on the ability of these approaches to provide high-resolution temporal and spatial insights into palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental forcing on human evolution, migration and
cultural change, the role of humans in impacting the environments around them through different forms of land use, and microevolutionary changes associated with ecological variability during
the Pleistocene epoch. We welcome submissions from around the world, dealing with lipid biomarkers (leaf-wax and PAHs) and CSIA to understand the role of climate and environment in
early human evolution and migration.

Conveners:
Ciprian F. Ardelean, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Mexico, cip_ardelean@hotmail.com c.ardelean@zohomail.com, (lead convener)
Antonio Pérez-Balarezo, ArScAn-Équipe AnTET (UMR 7041), CNRS, Université Paris-Nanterre, France, Fundación para los Estudios Patrimoniales del Pleistoceno de Osorno (FEPPO), Chile

Scientific theme: 3A: Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: No other topic in world archaeology is so controversial as the initial peopling of the Americas. Its dynamism has usually stimulated novel and better approaches, but its polemic side hindered the development of more integrate conceptualizations, something to go beyond theoretical, methodological, political or idiomatic borders. For almost 100 years of research, the main controversies revolved around the interrogation ¿when did the first Homo sp. inhabitants settle on the American continent? For now, there is no consensual answer to the question, and perhaps there will never be one. Yet, the discoveries made over the past decades have produced growing evidence in favor of a human arrival to the Americas during or even before the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM); this is much earlier than the currently used and politically correct threshold set at approximately 18,000 years before present, and, perhaps, even before 40 ka BP. The purpose of this session is to gather scholars who have been involved in field explorations on Pleistocene archaeological sites across the Americas, aiming at understanding ancient population dynamics. The current panorama indicates a striking diversity and variability of behaviors and techno-cultural manifestations occurring simultaneously across the continent during the LGM,
something that suggests a plurality of coeval groups and traditions. These symptoms of maturity support an initial peopling process triggered at much earlier times than commonly accepted.

Conveners:
William Gosling, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, w.d.gosling@uva.nl, (lead convener) Stephanie Kaboth-Bahr, University of Potsdam, Germany
Rahab Kinyanjui, National Museums of Kenya, Kenya Lynne Quick, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa Sarah Ivory, Penn State University, USA

Scientific theme: 3A: Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: Great uncertainty exists surrounding the link between climate change and hominin evolution, cultural development, and dispersal in and out of Africa. Several hypotheses have been proposed about how environmental conditions in Africa might have driven important developments in human origins over the last 4 million years. These findings link important evolutionary events with environmental change including cooling, drying, and wider climate fluctuations over time. However, key questions remain on the type, speed and driver of climate variability in Africa and how it affected evolution and development, e.g., did changing environment affect resources which consequently lead humans to develop new tools, why did so many early hominin species persist, evolve and/or go extinct, why did our species (Homo sapiens) emerge and survive, and how have we shaped our own environment either intentionally or unintentionally? In this session we look to bring together researchers focused on reconstructing past environments in Africa on the basis of empirical data (palaeoclimatic, palaeoecological, archaeological records) with researchers using modelling approaches (climate, vegetation, dispersal and cultural models). We hope to stimulate research and debate on how past change (climate, ecological, behavioral) shaped modern humans and the role of human niche construction on African environments. This session is linked to the INQUA “Mapping Ancient Africa” project, but we welcome all
submissions.

Conveners:
Philip Riris, Institute for Modelling Socio-Environmental Transitions, Bournemouth University, UK, priris@bournemouth.ac.uk, (lead convener)
Patrick Roberts, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany Eleanor Scerri, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany

Scientific theme: 3A: Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Recent research has transformed global tropical environments from relative blanks in the atlas of human history, to crucial sites of encounter and cultural development. Far beyond the simplistic “green hells” or “counterfeit paradises” of Western imaginations, these environments are prominent in models of our genus’ emergence, expansion, and proliferation across the planet, and latterly, our overexploitation of it. Scholars also recognise that neither land use, nor tropical landscapes themselves, were static in space or time. Indeed, their hallmark diversity are likely an artefact of human influence on, and in some cases, outright manipulation of, their biota. Equally, tropical environments and their inhabitants are sensitive to global climate changes both past and present. The goal of understanding spatiotemporal variation in the feedbacks and interactions between the human, biotic, and abiotic drivers of global tropical change remains a fruitful – yet challenging – area of enquiry. In response to such challenges, palaeoscientists recover an array of multiproxy records of human-environmental interaction globally. We invite contributions from any discipline focused on tropical human-environmental relationships, including the geosciences, neo- and palaeoecology, archaeology, palaeoanthropology, conservation, climatology, and more. We are particularly interested in the application of novel methods for reconstructing
socioecological dynamics over time.

Conveners:
Jenni Sherriff, Department of Geography, King’s College London, UK, jennifer.sherriff@kcl.ac.uk, (lead convener) Daniel Wolf, Dresden University of Technology, Department of Physical Geography, Dresden, Germany
Ariel Malinsky-Buller, The Institute of Archaeology, Hebrew University, Israel Alexander Brittingham, The Institute of Archaeology, Hebrew University, Israel
Theo Karambagldis, The Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Scientific theme: 3A: Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Southwest Asia lies at the intersection of major atmospheric circulation patterns, which have shifted as a consequence of past global climate changes. Furthermore, the region provided the primary route of dispersal for hominins leaving Africa throughout the Quaternary. In recent decades, increasing intensity of palaeoclimatic, palaeoenvironmental and archaeological research in SW Asia has demonstrated the impacts of orbital and sub- orbital climatic fluctuations on landscape dynamics, terrestrial biota, and hominin demographic changes. These changes have occurred against a backdrop of strong topographic gradients and intervals of intensive tectonic activity, which likely exacerbated fluctuations in ecosystems, landscapes, and hominin lifeways. Palaeoclimatic, palaeoenvironmental and archaeological records from the region differ in their chronological and spatial resolution, meaning our understanding of the timing and nature of these fluctuations is not yet fully realised. This interdisciplinary session aims to bring together ongoing research in SW Asia with the purpose of identifying emerging themes in palaeoclimatic research in the region, e.g., approaches to hydroclimatic reconstruction, the interplay of climate and topography on geomorphic and ecological change, and the integration of palaeoclimatic
and archaeological records.

Conveners:
Giorgia Camperio, Department of Earth Science, ETH Zurich and Department of Surface Waters Research and Management, Eawag, Switzerland, giorgia.camperio@eawag.ch, (lead convener)
Ignacio Jara, Center for Advanced Studies in Arid Zones, Chile Nivedita Mehrota, Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, India Charuta Kulkarni, Independent
Michela Mariani, School of Geography, University of Nottingham, UK
Emuobosa Orijemie, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria Xavier Benito, IRTA, Spain
and the rest of PASES organizers

Scientific theme: 3A: Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Interdisciplinary approaches are key to addressing current complex environmental issues such as ecosystem degradation and climate change adaptation. Despite their potential, collaborative initiatives in paleosciences are fraught with several challenges: 1) developing integrative methodologies for linking different types of proxies, 2) building integrative datasets global in scope, and 3) identifying strategies to put into practice the already acknowledged theoretical basis for impactful interdisciplinary studies. This session aims to highlight the complex dynamics among humans, climate, and the environment by means of exploring and analyzing Holocene records of socio-environmental systems, particularly from the regions historically marginalized from scientific collaborations, i.e., the Global South and other underrepresented regions (e.g. Southeast Europe). We seek contributions that apply interdisciplinary and inclusive approaches to determine drivers, magnitude, and rates of change of different components of past socio-environmental systems: environmental (pollen, charcoal, aquatic indicators, biomarkers), climate (speleothem, lake sediments, tree-rings, numerical simulations) and archaeological (archaeological radiocarbon dates, cultural material). This session aims to further stimulate collaborative avenues, giving continuity to the PAGES-INQUA ECRs workshop “Past Socio-Environmental Systems
(PASES)”, and the INQUA-funded pSESYNTH project.

Conveners:
Tara Beuzen-Waller, University of Tübingen, Germany, tara.beuzen-waller@uni-tuebingen.de, (lead convener) Peter Kühn, University of Tübingen, Germany
Lucas Proctor, Institute for Archaeological Sciences, Goethe University – Frankfurt, Germany
Frank Schlütz, Department of Palynology and Climate Dynamics, Albrecht-von-Haller Institute for Plant Sciences, University of Göttingen, Germany

Scientific theme: 3A: Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: We welcome interdisciplinary research on human-environment relationships (from prehistoric to early modern periods) in geologically or climatically sensitive regions, especially new case studies or approaches addressing the complexity of this topic.
Humans organize their lives around local and regional environmental conditions, today and in the past. Societies developed relationships with their surrounding ecosystems that structured subsistence strategies, economic organization, architecture, cultural traits, social interactions between humans and non-humans, as well as human modification of the environment. Such practices can enhance or hinder a society’s vulnerability to geological and climatic forcings at multiple scales. Indeed, tectonic forcing/geohazards (e.g. earthquakes) or climatic forcing, including short-term hazards (e.g. flooding) and climate change, may affect resource availability, vegetation cover, crop production, as well as damage living spaces. However, these forcings can also stimulate social or technical innovation and enhance the development of adaptive or resilient lifestyles.
The complexities inherent in linking ancient societies behaviour with dynamic natural processes and studying ancient human-environment relationships requires a wide range of approaches and scientific disciplines that deeply imbricate the social and natural sciences. These interdisciplinary datasets represent invaluable archives for
addressing modern climate challenges.

Conveners:
Simon Stoddart, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, ss16@cam.ac.uk, (lead convener)
Andrea Babbi, Institute of Heritage Science of the National Research Council of Italy (ISPC-CNR), Rome, Leibniz- Forschungsinstitut für Archäologie des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums (RGZM), Mainz, Germany Alessandra Celant, Sapienza Università di Roma, Dipartimento di Biologia Ambientale, Italy
Paolo Maria Guarino, Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale, Italy
Mauro Lucarini, Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale, Italy
Fabrizio Michelangeli, Sapienza Università di Roma, Dipartimento di Biologia Ambientale, Italy

Scientific theme: 3A: Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: The reciprocal and supporting relationship between past societies and water bodies has marked a long-lasting process of co-evolution, determining complex water–environment–people interactions with direct effects on social complexity, scale and organization, as well as on the rise and decline of ancient communities. Lakes, ponds, marshes, swamps, wetlands, lagoons, springs and rivers are vulnerable and changing environments prone to rapid hydroclimatic variations and recurrent ecological changes, affecting societal dynamics and development. These natural archives offer a unique opportunity to combine archaeological evidence (domestic structures; production areas/activities; docking facilities; canalization and land reclamation works; settlement fabric; burials; material culture, raw materials; means of transport; hints of exchange, cultural interaction and networking; documentary archives), palaeoecological proxies (pollen, carpological and anthracological remains, phytoliths, diatoms, ostracods, chironomids, insect fossils, biomolecules, and ancient DNA), and geological records (sedimentary sequences, varved deposits, speleothems, tephra layers). The large suite of evidence supplied by wet environments is fundamental to achieving a holistic perspective on the long-term environmental processes related to both human impact and climate fluctuations, as
well as on casting light on the ecological and societal resilience to abrupt changes.

Conveners:
Marco Madella, Department of Humanities, Culture and Socio-Ecological Dynamics group (CaSEs), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain, marco.madella@upf.edu, (lead convener)
Kathleen Morrison, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA Nicki Whitehouse, Department of Archaeology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
Marie-Josè Gaillard, Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden

Scientific theme: 3A: Geological and climate forcing on ancient societies and feedbacks

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: Holocene Global Landuse is an INQUA IFG interdisciplinary working group of the HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere that has been dedicated to reconstructing land use across the Holocene through a global, comparative perspective. Human land use activities are known to be drivers of vegetation change and can also produce potentially significant levels of greenhouse gases. However, the complex and variable relationships between land use (anthropic) and land cover (mostly climatic) are still insufficiently understood. Differing assumptions about these relationships have led to significant differences between models of anthropogenic land cover change (ALCC), a critical shortcoming with immediate scientific and policy implications for work on global climate.
Thus, scenarios of past anthropogenic land cover change show large differences. The degree and form of long- term and especially pre-industrial human impact on climate is still a matter of debate, and the effects of anthropogenic burning, deforestation, farming, and other land use practices on global climate via biogeochemical and biogeophysical processes in the past are not yet fully understood. Such understanding is critical, however, for planning solutions and improve descriptions of past anthropogenic land cover change at both regional and global scales are therefore urgently needed.
The IFG Holocene Global Landuse addressed vegetation cover change across the globe. Archaeologists have argued that land cover changes due to anthropogenic land use are very old, dating to periods well before the start of agriculture. While the beginnings of agriculture are dated to ca. 6000 calendar years BP in Europe (a date that has attracted the attention of climate modelers) farming is significantly older or later in other parts of the world. We would like to attract work on the historical transitions, such as the one represented by the Neolithic, or technological advances, such as intensification of agriculture or urbanization processes, on changes in land use and their relationship with vegetation and climate change. We would be interested in research that used archaeological and historical evidence, including texts, maps, images, settlements, artifacts, and plant and animal
remains from archaeological contexts.

3B- Geoarchaeology: from landscape to site and back

Conveners:
Matthieu Ghilardi, Centre Européen de Recherches et d’enseignement des Géosciences de l’Environnement (CEREGE), Aix-Marseille University, France, ghilardi@cerege.fr, (lead convener)
Federico Di Rita, Dipartimento di Biologia Ambientale, Sapienza Università di Roma, Italy
Veronica Rossi, Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche e Ambientali, Università di Bologna, Italy Emanuela Borgia, Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Antichità, Sapienza Università di Roma,Italy
Matteo Vacchi, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Pisa,Italy

Scientific theme: 3B: Geoarchaeology: from landscape to site and back

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: The interest of human populations for coastal areas is ancestral. Since the rise of agriculturally based societies humans have produced cumulative and often irreversible impacts on natural coastal landscapes worldwide. Nevertheless, coasts have ever represented a threat for the preservation of settlements due to their vulnerability to geomorphologic processes, sea level oscillations and other environmental alterations driven by the climate changes.
In this session, we aim to bring together recent advances in geoarchaeological and palaeolandscape reconstructions contributing to an improved understanding of environmental pressures underwent by humans, and their responses, in the peopling processes of coasts during the Quaternary.
Contributions from different disciplines (e.g. archaeology, geomorphology, micropaleontology, sedimentology, geochemistry, paleoecology, palynology) relating to, but not limited to, the following topics are welcomed:
• rates and modes of transformation from nature-dominated to human-dominated coastal landscapes;
• decadal to millennial climate changes with a high impact on coastal ecosystems and clear implications on human infrastructures vulnerability and demographic dynamics;
• resilience and adaptation strategies of past human populations to drivers of coastal environmental change;
• novel methodological approaches in both dating materials from transitional marine/continental environments and building calibrated chronological models in coastal sites.

Conveners:
Laura Parducci, Department of Environmental Biology, La Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, laura.parducci@uniroma1.it, (lead convener)
Francesco Gentile Ficetola, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, Milano University, Italy
Viviane Slon, Department of Anatomy and Anthropology and Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Inger Alsos Greve, University of Tromsø, Norway
Tony Brown, University of Tromsø, Norway; University of Southampton, UK

Scientific theme: 3B: Geoarchaeology: from landscape to site and back; 3D: Paleoantropology

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: The extraction and analysis of ancient environmental DNA from Quaternary and archaeological sediments has the potential to revolutionize palaeoecology and archaeology and will likely expand fast in the next decades. The fast growth of this research avenue is driven, among others, by the following recent developments: a) ancient DNA can be retrieved from sediments and soils even in the absence of fossils, including that of ancient humans; b) ancient DNA has been shown to be preserved also outside the sub-Arctic and Arctic biomes; c) the costs of sequencing are decreasing; d) different techniques for data generation (including approaches such as shotgun sequencing and hybridization capture) are becoming more robust and allow for deeper taxonomic coverage; and e) the number of laboratories that use these methodologies has increased worldwide. Ancient environmental DNA is now being used more routinely alongside traditional proxies such as pollen and plant macrofossil to reconstruct ancient paleoenvironments and harbors the potential to investigate both human activities as well as the history of plants and pathogens microorganisms. This session invites papers using ancient DNA from sediments or soils from any site and any period. Methodological papers are also welcome.

Conveners:
Kalyan S. Chakraborty, Department of Anthropology, McMaster University, Canada; Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH), Germany, kalyan2287@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Sourav Mukhopadhyay, Deccan College Post Graduate and Research Institute, India Deepak K. Jha, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH), Germany

Scientific theme: 3B: Geoarchaeology: from landscape to site and back

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: South Asia is exceptionally rich in geological, paleontological, and archaeological remains. In the last two decades, numerous sites with these remains have been excavated and analyzed by researchers worldwide. The recent discoveries have extensively contributed to our growing knowledge of the landscape, and its relation to the biological, socio-cultural, and political expression of humankind. The regions of South Asia have witnessed, especially during the Quaternary Period, the first appearance of hominin, the evolution of modern humans, the adoption and dispersal of agriculture, economic specialization, development of complex societies and states, and extensive growth of the human population.
Therefore, the theme of the session is to discuss and investigate human-environment interaction in South Asia that shaped the regional physiological, cultural, social, and political evolution of humans. We will discuss how climatic and environmental changes have constantly impacted and modified the interaction between humans and their landscape since the onset of the Quaternary Period. This session will provide a platform to evaluate human interaction to natural and cultural changes in this region to comprehend human-environment interrelationship better. We invite research papers on various aspects of shifting landscape, human evolution, paleoclimate
reconstruction, human interaction with natural and cultural environment, management of archaeological and heritage resources in South Asia.

Conveners:
Margarita Jambrina-Enríquez, Universidad de La Laguna, Spain, mjmabrin@ull.edu.es, (lead convener) Natalia Égüez Gordon, Universidad de La Laguna, Spain
Rory Connolly, University College Dublin, Ireland
Carlos Duarte Simões, ICArEHB – Universidade do Algarve, Portugal

Scientific theme: 3B: Geoarchaeology: from landscape to site and back

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Biomarkers and their isotopic composition are increasingly used on a wide variety of archaeological materials of different temporal scales. The identification of novel molecular biomarkers, their abundance and distribution patterns, and extensive stable isotope analysis provides a powerful tool for detecting animal husbandry, food resources, and landscape use linking to direct evidence of occupation, the use of plants and animals, and anthropogenic activities. This session aims to discuss the potential and limitations of lipid biomarkers analysis in sediment, plants, dung, shells, pottery, and any other recovered archaeological material for the interpretation of anthropogenic signatures and the possible influence between human activities and environmental changes. This session also invites contributions that address a biomarker approach in experimental studies with a clear archaeological motivation.

Conveners:
Martina Di Matteo, Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Antichità, Sapienza Università di Roma, Italy, martina.dimatteo@uniroma1.it, (lead convener)
Emanuele Cancellieri, Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Antichità, Sapienza Università di Roma, Italy
Stefano Costanzo, Dipartimento di Asia, Africa e Mediterraneo, Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”, Italy Rocco Rotunno, Dipartimento di Scienze dell’Antichità, Sapienza Università di Roma, Italy

Scientific theme: 3B: Geoarchaeology: from landscape to site and back

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Arid lands are characterized by eroded landscapes where Quaternary archaeological archives are overly rare. The construction of long multiproxy sequences has traditionally seen strong investments in caves and shelters, privileged contexts for the preservation of sedimentary successions with organic and inorganic remains as paleoenvironmental and cultural proxies. This caused a severe bias for the understanding of regional land use strategies and paleoenvironmental evolution in open-air palimpsests, especially in areas where the record is mostly made of deflated surfaces and incoherent sediments. Nevertheless, open-air sites bear potential for revealing archaeological horizons and associated palaeoenvironmental records even in poorly preserved landscapes. Their identification, analysis, and interpretation, however, requires ad-hoc strategies for addressing peculiar patterns of formation processes and preservation constraints. The session prompts discussion on the approaches to open-air stratified contexts in arid lands, in particular by tackling issues like the relationship between the physical and environmental features of the areas being investigated and preservation potential; the role and interdependence of remote sensing and field research; the most effective methodologies for intensive investigation and excavation; the contribution provided by such contexts for territorial analyses; the means to
mitigate environmental and human threats also for dissemination purposes.

3C- Preserving and disseminating the cultural heritage

Conveners:
Michael-Shawn Fletcher, School of Geography, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia, michael.fletcher@unimelb.edu.au, (lead convener)
Michela Mariani, University of Nottingham, UK
Simon Connor, Australian National University, Australia Yoshi Maezumi, Max Planck Institute Jena, Germany Anthony Romano, The University of Melbourne, Australia

Scientific theme: 3C: Preserving and disseminating the cultural heritage

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: Prior to colonisation by Europeans during the past six centuries, many regions had been deliberately shaped, maintained and cared for by First Nations peoples using skillful land-management practices. Colonisation saw the suppression and cessation of these practices, and the imposition of European ideals of land management. This shift in the way land was perceived, used and managed led to a broad set of environmental consequences.
Catastrophic wildfires, biodiversity loss, soil salinisation and environmental pollution are among the impacts of post-colonial land management changes, many of which are now being compounded by the impacts of climate change. This has prompted researchers and policymakers to consider Indigenous approaches to land management as a potential solution to the current environmental challenges. While Indigenous people possess knowledge of how landscapes have changed, policy is often driven by empirical scientific data. It is imperative that we develop datasets of environmental change spanning the pre-to post-colonial period so that appropriate baselines and management approaches guide future landscape management. This session invites talks around the environmental impacts of colonialism evidenced by palaeoecological, archaeological, and archaeobotanical proxies, as well as modelling applications. We welcome local, regional case-studies and intercomparisons from the
colonised world, particularly from Indigenous researchers.

3D- Palaeoanthropology

Conveners:
Picin Andrea, Bereich für Ur- und Frühgeschichtliche Archäologie, Friedrich Schiller Universität Jena, Germany, andrea.picin@uni-jena.de picinandrea@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Andrea Zerboni, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra “A. Desio”, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy Giovanni Muttoni, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra “A. Desio”, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy Sahra Talamo, Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, Alma Mater Studiorum Universitá di Bologna, Italy

Scientific theme: 3D: Palaeoantropology

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Understanding how archaic humans have reacted to past climate changes, where they survived during periods of climatic deterioration, and when they repopulated the abandoned areas is a crucial topic in Human Evolution for exploring the processes of adaptation and extinction of hominins. The Last Glacial (MIS 5d – MIS 2) was the longest cycle of climatic instability of the Pleistocene, characterized by alternating interglacial and cold stages during which the Fennoscandia ice sheet expanded and retreated. Within these long-term fluctuations, the climate was also amplified by phases of abrupt cooling (Heinrich events) and short temperate-cold cycles (Dansgaard–Oeschger). All these climatic variations made the European territories a challenging habitat for the local hunter-gatherers that had to cope with new ecological conditions, faunal turnover, and increased seasonality. This session aims to gather archaeological research from high-resolution Middle and Upper Palaeolithic contexts in which the interplay between environmental and chronometric data can unveil variations in subsistence and/or technological strategies. This session focuses on local studies and interregional comparisons for outlining the trajectories of humans’ adaptation and resilience to the climatic variability. Speakers are welcome
to present new data, results and interpretations, as well as theoretical and methodological approaches that pertain to these issues.

Conveners:
Jacopo Niccolò Cerasoni, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany, cerasoni@shh.mpg.de, (lead convener)
Emily Yuko Hallett, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany

Scientific theme: 3D: Palaeoantropology

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: At the intersection of archaeology, palaeoecology and evolutionary sciences, anthro-environments can also be defined as the convergence between anthropogenic dynamics and environmental diversity. This complex relationship can be studied using a variety of methods within a multitude of fields, from traditional archaeological practices to laboratory-based biochemical investigations. Recently, such methodologies have frequently applied to the study of Quaternary behavioral patterns of African hominin populations, their dynamics, and their interactions as part of the same ecosystem.
This session aims to highlight and create a common stage for the discussion and presentation of the diverse types of Pan-African Quaternary anthro-environments ranging from the Early Pleistocene to the Late Holocene, documenting human-environment relationships at local, regional and continental scales. This session intends to create a continent-wide perspective of the current state of research of anthro-environments. Presentations concerning new archaeological (survey, excavation, material culture or geoarchaeological), paleoenvironmental (paleoecological, paleobotanical or palaeoclimatological), bioanthropological, or computational investigations applied to African Quaternary contexts, particularly from poorly represented regions such as North, West, and
Central Africa, are welcome.

4- Ecosystems and biogeography from latest Pliocene to “Anthropocene”

Conveners:
Lo Iacono Claudio, Spanish National Research Council – CSIC, Spain, loiacono@icm.csic.es, (lead convener) Martina Pierdomenico, Italian National Research Council, Italy
Peter Harris, GRID-Arendal, Norway
Michael Claire, National Oceanography Centre, UK

Scientific theme: 4: Ecosystems and biogeography from latest Pliocene to “Anthropocene”

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: The vulnerability of marine ecosystems to anthropogenic pollution is of growing concern. Contaminants including chemical pollutants, litter and microplastics, are being discharged into the global ocean, while past waste mismanagement leaves a long-lasting legacy.
However, despite their importance, the fate of contaminants in the marine environment is poorly known. It has been proposed that sedimentological approaches may be applied to this challenge, to identify source to sink pathways and pollution hotspots, quantify deep-sea fluxes, environmental residence times, interactions with other anthropogenic activities and ecosystem impacts. At the same time, it is equally important to identify exceptions.
While many aspects are similar, the physical and chemical properties of pollutants can fundamentally differ from those of natural sediment, hence their behaviour and pathways may differ too. Conventional approaches may require significant adaptation, and testing, calibration and exploration is required.
This session encourages scientific and industrial research collaborations to advance the understanding of sedimentary and oceanographic processes that control pollution dispersal in the marine environment, impacts on
ocean ecosystems and their signature in the geologic record.

Conveners:
Natalie Kehrwald, USGS, Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center, Denver, CO, USA, nkehrwald@usgs.gov, (lead convener)
Paul Henne, USGS, Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center, Denver, CO, USA
Erika Gobet, University of Bern, Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, Switzerland
Albert Hafner, University of Bern, Institute of Archaeological Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, Switzerland
César Morales del Molino, University of Alcalá, Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain
Christoph Schwörer, University of Bern, Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, Switzerland

Scientific theme: 4: Ecosystems and biogeography from latest Pliocene to “Anthropocene”

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Human history is punctuated with the rise and fall of societies. Researchers have attributed social collapse to past climate changes that created conditions untenable for civilizations to continue living in the way in which they developed. However, recent research and oral histories both demonstrate that while climate change may have altered human habitation, people also adapted to climate change. This session seeks contributions focused on understanding societal susceptibility, resilience, and adaptations to past climate change that inform the management of ecosystem services in a changing climate. Examples of resilience include altering land use from water-intensive agriculture to pastoralism during droughts, dispersal into smaller settlements, increased mobility, technological innovation, managing fuel loads in fire-prone environments, and changing crops in response to growing season variations. These interactions between human societies and climate are recorded in combinations of paleoclimate records, paleoecological reconstructions, the dynamics of material culture as revealed by archaeology, and traditional ecological knowledge, but can also be explored with simulation approaches. We welcome submissions from any time during the Quaternary that demonstrate interactions between humans and climate using proxies for climate and land-use change, archaeological records, traditional ecological knowledge,
and/or dynamic simulations of past human/environment interactions.

Conveners:
Valentina Alice Bracchi, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy, valentina.bracchi@unimib.it, (lead convener) Silvia Danise, University of Florence, Italy
Erin Saupe, University of Oxford, UK Rafal Nawrot, University of Wien, Austria
Nadia Santodomingo Aguilar, Natural History Museum, UK

Scientific theme: 4: Ecosystems and biogeography from latest Pliocene to “Anthropocene”

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Despite the influence of paleontology on ecology since the 18th century, the discipline of conservation paleobiology was only formally established in the first decade of the 21st century. Conservation paleobiology applies geological and paleoecological methods and data to the conservation of modern species and ecosystems, with the advantage of lengthening the scale of observation far beyond the timescale of direct ecological monitoring (i.e., from centuries to thousands and million years). Marine and terrestrial geohistorical archives constitute the core information to better understand how biotas have responded to past climate and environmental changes, and to disentangle what can be deemed to recent anthropogenic stressors. This approach provides context and guidance in a changing world and can address challenges faced by modern conservation biology, such as understanding the extinction risk of endangered species, providing baselines for restoration, and modelling future scenarios for species’ range contraction or expansion. In this context, we seek contributions that explore late Neogene and Quaternary changes in the structure and composition of past communities, ecosystems and environments through time. Studies depicting hypothetical scenarios of community and geosystem dynamics in the face of future climate and anthropogenic change, which rely on multi-disciplinary and multi-scale
approaches, are especially encouraged. Both terrestrial and marine records are welcome.

Conveners:
Fumie Iizuka, University of California, Merced, USA, iizukafumie@gmail.com, (lead convener) Karisa Terry, Central Washington University, USA
Loren Davis, Oregon State University, USA

Scientific theme: 4: Ecosystems and biogeography from latest Pliocene to “Anthropocene”

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes

Abstract: The terminal Pleistocene was a major period when drastic climatic and ecosystem changes occurred, and humans made behavioral decisions. However, more case studies from distinct areas are needed to better understand the associations of ecosystem and behavioral changes. The Pacific rim is among those regions. For example, in the Japanese archipelago, adoption of pottery often marks the transitions from the Upper Paleolithic to Incipient Jomon but the timing and nature of change vary by regions. To better understand these changes, we must systematically examine how changing coastal and inland ecosystems influenced forager decisions. In addition, genomic data suggest that the first American ancestors originated in Northeast Asia, and archaeological discoveries suggest that foragers migrated via Pacific rim to the Americas using boats before ~16,000 cal BP from coastal Northeast Asia. However, more contextual information is needed about the ecosystem conditions and changes that may have served as inducers of such a migration, the coastal and marine environments along the Pacific Rim, and the adaptive strategies these migrants used during their movements into the Americas to evaluate this hypothesis. To improve these situations, this session gathers studies on the terminal Pleistocene Pacific rim by exploring the following themes: (1) timing and nature of environmental and ecosystem change, and (2) human
responses to those changes and their adaptations in distinct regions.

Conveners:
Samantha M. Krause, Texas State University, USA, samkrause@txstate.edu, (lead convener) Timothy Beach, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Amy E. Thompson, University of Texas at Austin, USA Byron Smith, University of Texas at Austin, USA

Scientific theme: 4: Ecosystems and biogeography from latest Pliocene to “Anthropocene”

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: In the spirit of the INQUA Congress theme “Time for Change”, this session explores the complex ways in which humans have modified and transformed their landscapes throughout the Holocene. From ancient cityscapes to vast agricultural systems, humans exhibit long-lasting control over their environments that significantly alters soil processes, wetlands and watersheds, and vegetation. This session welcomes all contributions in which researchers use novel and interdisciplinary techniques such as remote sensing (lidar, satellite imagery, UAV technology, and more) as well as geoarchaeological methods that reconstruct historic and prehistoric land use, and paleo-environments and geomorphological histories. We address questions of sustainable versus non- sustainable land use, the resilience of human populations across latitudes in the face of shifting climates, and our understanding of landscape transformations using cutting-edge technologies. Integrating the scientific theme of Ecosystems and biogeography from latest Pliocene to “Anthropocene” we welcome all papers focusing on the multitude of methods by which we can map, model, and reconstruct the vast geomorphic and landscape changes that have occurred during the paleo-Anthropocene. Our goal is to understand human-landscape interaction
through time and apply what we have learned from the past to the modern challenges that threaten our environments today, potentially helping to mitigate these issues for future generations.

4A- Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

Conveners:
Antigone Uzunidis, Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social (IPHES-CERCA), Spain, antigone.uzunidis@wanadoo.fr, (lead convener)
Gina Semprebon, Bay Path University, USA
Florent Rivals, Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social Tarragona, Spain ICREA, Barcelona, Spain Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Even if Quaternary climatic and environmental variations on a global scale are well known, their impacts at regional or local scales are more difficult to investigate. Several methods have been developed but are taxed with recurrent problems. It can be difficult to integrate high-resolution results in a global framework as they can reflect very short/limited events. Also, it is often not possible to establish their temporal and geographical extent. Finally, linking these approaches with studies directly describing human behaviour is still complex because of the difficulty in describing real paleoecosystems in the ecological sense of the term. One path to overcome some of these limitations is to combine several proxies. For example, considering flora and fauna in the same model or combining different-scale proxies on the same materials. This implies an analysis of the potentials and limits of each proxy before any application.
This session is aimed at discussing how to combine data from different origins. Several issues will be highlighted:
– What are the potentials and limits of environmental proxies at a local or regional scale?
– How to contextualize this information with longer/larger temporal and geographical scales data?
– What are the statistical/modelling tools we can use to integrate proxies on different scales?
We invite submissions from researchers using and combining any methods or proxies on different scales and/or
combining flora and fauna in the same model and their applications to interdisciplinary issues.

Conveners:
Stefan Engels, Birkbeck University of London, UK, s.engels@bbk.ac.uk, (lead convener)
Michal Slowinski, Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland Valerie van den Bos, GNS Science, New Zealand

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The last Glacial-Interglacial cycle is characterised by abrupt and high-amplitude climate changes which led to large-scale environmental and ecological changes across the globe. In recent times, human-induced climate change as well as a myriad of other anthropogenic impacts including land use change, deforestation, and changes to the major biogeochemical cycles have emerged as novel drivers of ecosystem change. It is unclear how natural ecosystems will respond to ongoing and potentially intensifying anthropogenic disruptions, where freshwater ecosystems are of particular concern as their functioning has been disproportionally affected. Palaeoecological records can provide new insights into the complex relationships that exist between environmental variability and ecosystem functioning. In this session we invite contributions that provide palaeoecological evidence of ecosystem response to external forcing. High-resolution datasets from well-dated natural archives will allow for the identification of the structure of ecosystem response within a lake or peat bog through the establishment of decadal to centennial-scale offsets in the timing of proxy-response to forcing. They will further allow to differentiate leads and lags between sites across a wider region. Ultimately, such information will be of key importance for effective conservation management and ecological restoration of heavily impacted freshwater
ecosystems under current global warming.

Conveners:
Adam Izdebski, Palaeoscience and History group, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany, izdebski@shh.mpg.de, (lead convener)
Paolo Carafa, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
Alessia Masi, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Palaeoscience and History group, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Paleoenvironmental, historical and archaeological research has produced an impressive amount of knowledge. Consilience among disciplines has been already postulated (Izdebski et al. 2016, Quaternary Science Reviews 136, 5-22) drawing the path for a real integration but without convincing some skeptical scholars. The development and application of new techniques and methodologies have reduced the distance among disciplines even if much still needs to be done. This session looks into current progress and challenges in reconstructing the past, producing a new narrative and overcoming past incomprehension and analytical limits. Which are the major limits in the integration of natural and human sciences? Which are the best proxies and archives to take in consideration? What is the best way to present the results to the different academic field? The intention is to collect projects and successful attempts that integrate environmental evidence within frameworks that identify
the palaeoenvironmental element as a driver in the construction of, and changes in, culture.

Conveners:
Scott Cocker, University of Alberta, Canada, scocker@ualberta.ca, (lead convener) Tyler Murchie, McMaster University, Canada
Sarah Crump, University of Utah, USA

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Lagerstätten—deposits with extraordinary preservation or an abundance of fossils —provide uniquely vivid windows into Quaternary ecosystems. Ongoing advances in methods targeting proxies like ancient DNA, biomarkers, and stable isotopes continue to draw ever more sophisticated understandings of the past from such exceptionally well-preserved deposits. Furthermore, the scope of what may constitute lagerstätten is being redefined as new approaches continue to expand the potential of seemingly unremarkable deposits (those primarily devoid of strong micro/macrofossil records) for understanding palaeoecological structure and function. This session is intended to broadly interest researchers working with exceptionally preserved or biologically rich samples from permafrost, dry caves, lakes, and other deposits to enhance their analysis of key questions in Quaternary palaeoecology. We welcome researchers from all disciplinary and methodological backgrounds (with an emphasis on early career researchers) to help discuss what unique pieces of information lagerstätten can
provide to Quaternary science.

Conveners:
Quinn Asena, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, qasena@wisc.edu, (lead convener) Jack Williams, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: Contemporary ecosystems are experiencing increasing anthropogenic pressure, and there is growing concern over how they will respond to such novel pressures. Palaeoecology offers crucial understanding of how ecosystems have responded to environmental change in the past and provides valuable insight into how ecosystems will change in the future. As such, it is increasingly recognised that appropriate quantitative methods and informatics workflows should be used to analyse proxy data from local to global scales and quantify uncertainties surrounding them .
This session focuses on long-term ecological proxy data, concentrating on advancements in quantitative/statistical and modelling methods and their application to empirical data. We invite contributions on: (1) introducing new methods of analysing and interpreting proxy records (e.g., statistical advancements, informatics pipelines, comparing chronologies, or quantifying uncertainties); (2) modelling advancements to understand real-world processes; and (3) the application of new methods to empirical data. This session is open to theoretical and empirical work, and we encourage submissions combining empirical, modelling, or statistical methods. We also encourage work on analysing multivariate proxy records, multi-proxy archives, and pseudoproxies. Studies from a
range of biomes (from the tropics to the poles) and timescales from decades to millennia are welcome.

Conveners:
Kale Sniderman, School of Geography, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia, kale.sniderman@unimelb.edu.au, (lead convener)
Angela Bruch, Senckenberg Research Institut, Frankfurt am Main, German

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: The Early Pleistocene is characterized by severe global environmental changes – its beginning with the onset of northern hemisphere glaciations, and its termination influenced by the Mid-Pleistocene Transition. The Early Pleistocene represents ca. 70% of the Quaternary, during which events of supreme importance happened, including the emergence of the genus Homo and its spread out of Africa towards the furthest edges of Eurasia, from southeast Asia to Southern Spain. Also, orbital forcing of climate considerably increased its impact on regional environmental changes, with a growing cyclicity of vegetation shifts paced by obliquity and/or precession. In many regions of the world, Early Pleistocene floras include a number of (regionally to globally) extinct taxa. The global extent and drivers of these extinctions are still uncertain, and it is unclear whether Early Pleistocene extinctions were driven by the appearance of novel climates during glacials or during interglacials, or if climatic drivers varied between regions.
This session aims to gather insights into regional and local characteristics of Early Pleistocene terrestrial environments of all continents, their stepwise floristic changes, and how vegetation and flora are driven by global forcing. We hope to bring new insights into climate and vegetation dynamics during this important interval when the global stage was set for early Homo.
This session is a contribution to NECLIME and ROCEEH.

Conveners:
Raffaele Sardella, Department of Earth Sciences, PaleoFactory, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, raffaele.sardella@uniroma1.it, (lead convener)
Alessio Iannucci, Department of Earth Sciences, PaleoFactory, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
George E. Konidaris, Palaeoanthropology, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment, Germany
Dimitris S. Kostopoulos, School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessloniki, Greece
Joan Madurell-Malapeira, Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: The Quaternary is a time of fundamental climatic shifts and environmental changes that highlight the need for a thorough investigation from different perspectives and at multiple scales to disentangle the factors involved in the response of the biota. In turn, recognising bioevents (e.g., dispersal or extinction of species) and relating them to geological time is crucial for correlating changes between distant geographic regions. The mammalian fossil record is widely used for biochronological correlations and palaeoecological reconstructions of the Euro-Mediterranean region, and represents, an especially important proxy for inferring the timing, pattern and palaeoenvironmental context of the earliest hominins dispersals into Europe. Research in the response of mammals to the palaeoenvironmental changes of the Euro-Mediterranean Quaternary and developing a consistent and precise pan-European biochronological framework require a thoughtful integration of data and schemes from different geographic areas. This is especially relevant considering the wealth of new discoveries of the last decades and the semantic and conceptual differences in the use of biochronological terms, like Mammal Ages (e.g., Villafranchian and Galerian). This session invites contributions on the evolution of mammal communities and ecosystems, the identification and definition of bioevents, including taxonomic studies, and the
discussion of their broader biochronological and palaeoecological significance.

Conveners:
Kamilla Pawłowska, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, koka@amu.edu.pl, (lead convener) Luca Pandolfi, University of Florence, Italy

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: The session will focus on reviewing the current state of knowledge regarding fossil rhinoceroses (Stephanorhinus hemitoechus, Stephanorhinus kirchbergensis, Coelodonta antiquitatis) in Europe and Asia from the Late Pleistocene and the early/mid-Holocene (MIS 5e–MIS 1). Evidence of the presence of rhinoceroses should be presented in terms of their response to palaeoenvironmental changes, and of the geological or archaeological context in which their remains were found. We are thus looking for contributions dealing with potential morphotypes that have arisen in response to environmental variability, and geographic or chronological patterns in specific countries or European region, using morphometry and dating respectively as methodological approaches. Submissions demonstrating human impact on these rhinoceros’ species, especially with regard to extinction, will be highly appreciated. In turn, results of genetic studies showing genetic diversity within the species and estimated population size will also greatly enhance the discussion about fossil rhinoceroses.

Conveners:
Mike Morley, College of Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia, mike.morley@flinders.edu.au, (lead convener)
Andrea Zerboni, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra “A. Desio”, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy Natalia Eguez, Archaeological Micromorphology and Biomarkers Lab, Instituto Universitario de Bio-Orgánica Antonio González, Universidad de La Laguna, Spain
Irini Sifogeorgaki, World Archaeology, Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Cave and rockshelters are natural sediment traps that can preserve stratigraphic sequences formed through the interplay of many natural and anthropogenic processes. These landscape features have been exploited by humans throughout the Quaternary, and under some conditions preserve evidence of human activity that would otherwise not have been saved or would have been impossible to locate in open-air contexts. Cave sediments are in many cases discontinuously accreted, and stratigraphic sequences are often interspersed with erosional and chronological gaps. Notwithstanding, these sequences are rich repositories that preserve traces of past human activity, including evidence of early pyrotechnology, livestock herding, the management of natural resources, and paleoclimatic information. This session aims at illustrating the twofold opportunities offered by cave sediments in reconstructing past human behavior and environmental change driven by the dynamics of Quaternary climate. We wish to gather experts from a wide range of geographic and climatic contexts, spanning coastal to high mountain regions, continental to tropical to arid regions. In addition, we welcome contributions dedicated to new dating methods and advances in archaeological science used to interpret the many facets of
archaeological cave sediments.

Conveners:
Eva Panagiotakopulu, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, UK, eva.p@ed.ac.uk, (lead convener) James E. Schofield, Dept. of Geography and Environment, School of GeoSciences, University of Aberdeen, UK

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The investigation of biotic changes resulting from shifts in climate and human impact are a main preoccupation of Holocene palaeoenvironmental research. This has involved the development of local, regional and global reconstructions which provide information on gains and losses in biota and assessments of the impact these had on past ecosystems. Catastrophic events, climatic episodes, or anthropogenic activities – ranging from megafaunal extinctions, woodland clearance and management, through farming and settlement – have left their imprint on aspects of the fauna and flora. Similarly, general trends for change in different biomes and habitats, taxa surviving in refugia, the immigration of biota after the last glaciation, accidental and intentional introductions, and extirpations and extinctions, have all variously shaped Holocene environments. This session will consider changing biodiversity from the point of view of the biota – single species and suites of species – and will highlight key indicators of change. Taxa surviving in refugia, keystone and stenotopic species, and biota introduced by humans, as well as the ecosystems they are found in, can help us to map change in Holocene environments. From case studies to large overviews, and drawing upon research from the fields of palaeoecology, environmental archaeology, ancient DNA, isotopic research and modelling, this session is intended to stimulate discussion about
the role played by Holocene biota in signaling ecosystem transition and habitat change.

Conveners:
Christoph Schwörer, Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Switzerland, christoph.schwoerer@ips.unibe.ch, (lead convener)
Maria Leunda, Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Switzerland
Christoph Sperisen, WSL Swiss Federal Research Institute, Birmensdorf, Switzerland

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: Global Change is profoundly altering ecosystems and species distributions around the world. Species responses to past environmental changes have long been studied using traditional palaeoecological methods or numerical models. In the last decades, a new approach has been added to the palaeoecological toolbox: the analysis of ancient DNA (aDNA) from preserved tissues or sediment matrix. Such palaeogenomic data allows researchers to directly trace the impact of palaeoenvironmental changes on individuals or populations on a genetic level. Examples include changes in genetic diversity from population expansion or decline, genetic adaptation to changing environmental conditions, domestication processes, or extinction of local populations or even species due to anthropogenic or climatic disturbance. For this session, we aim to bring together scientists from different fields of research such as palaeoecology, palaeogenomics, population genetics or conservation biology that are interested in past genetic changes and how they can inform future ecosystem management. We welcome contributions that study population genetic changes during the Quaternary based on aDNA from any organism, provide new or improved methods for aDNA extraction and analysis, or combine palaeogenomic and
palaeoecological approaches.

Conveners:
Nicki Whitehouse, University of Glasgow, UK, Nicki.whitehouse@glasgow.ac.uk, (lead convener) Emma Jenkins, University of Bournemouth, UK
Alejo Ordonez, University of Aarhus, Denmark Steve Jackson, University of Whyoming, USA

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes; 4B Palaeoecology as a tool for ecosystem management

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Archaeological and palaeoecological records play an important role in understanding how natural and human systems interact. Long-term records provide insights into how natural systems may have functioned under certain conditions, including climatic ones, and show how natural systems may react and change in the future, including future scenarios. Alongside this, archaeological, historical and contemporary records offer valuable insights around indigenous practices and traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) that provide different cultural perspectives on local resource management.

Modern conservation practices that include wilding, re-wilding, re-naturing approaches and aspects of TEK are used pro-actively to help manage and restore our landscapes and ecosystems and enable them to be resilient to change. However, there is limited understanding of the type and range of information that long-term environmental records and indigenous practices can provide and how this information can aid conservation practices. Some conservation practices are also not without threat to the archaeological and palaeoecological record (e.g. through damage to built heritage and because they can ignore cultural practices and intangible heritage), and some may be retrogressive in certain ecological situations; however, the tangible benefits can be transformational. Recent environmental humanities approaches can also offer additional perspectives, by engaging with more-than-human and multi species approaches that offer new ways of thinking about our place in the world, that recognise the entangled nature of relationships between all beings.

We explore how archaeology, palaeoecology, traditional knowledge, environmental humanities and landscape management practices intersect and benefit nature and the future of our landscapes and biological systems. Nature and people live alongside each other; what can be learnt by bringing together different approaches and view-points for a more sustainable, culturally informed future?

Conveners:
Daniela Basso, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy, daniela.basso@unimib.it, (lead convener) Christian Betzler, University of Hamburg, Germany
Silvia Spezzaferri, University of Fribourg, Switzerland Elias Samankassou, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Scientific theme: 4A: Response of biota to palaeoenvironmental changes

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; PALCOM-PalaeoclimatesM

Abstract: Biogenic reefs, build-ups and mounds are represented in the Quaternary record by a variety of morphologies, external architectures, and components. Most of them grew by in situ repeated superposition of a mixture of skeletal and microbial carbonate, deposited on the shelves during the Holocene sea-level rise; others developed in aphotic marine environments. Their inception and growth, on a secular to millennial scale, responded to a complex interplay of available substrate, sedimentary regime, geological and oceanographic controls acting on their physical environment and food/nutrient supply. The local combined effects of sea level change and vertical land motion generated a diverse suite of geomorphologies, with different types of bioconstruction occurring across the latitudinal and depth gradients. The main framework builders were organisms with a multidecadal to centennial life span, such as calcareous algae, bivalves, bryozoans, corals that recorded many biogeochemical paleoceanographic proxies with high definition and were variably associated in distinctive paleo-benthic assemblages. They hosted a high diversity of micro-dwellers, such as foraminifera, responding rapidly to the environmental changes and heralding major crisis and demise. We invite contributions about reefs as natural multiscale and multi-proxy archives of climatic, oceanographic, and local changes for the
Quaternary.

4B- Islands, continental bridges and drowned landscapes

Conveners:
Ingrid Ward, University of Western, Australia, ingrid.ward@uwa.edu.au, (lead convener) Helen Farr, Uni. Of Southhampton, UK
Andrew Green, Uni. Of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa Hayley Cawthra, Marine Geoscience, Geophysics & Remote Sensing Unit, Council for Geoscience, CapeTown, South Africa
Alex Bastos, Uni. Of Espirito santo, Brasile
Diego Carabias; Millennium Nucleus Ocean, Heritage & Culture & ARQMAR, Chile;

Scientific theme: 4B: Islands, continental bridges and drowned landscapes

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: The study of submerged landscapes and human occupation records has rapidly emerged as a key topic in Quaternary science, aided by new and higher-resolution geophysical, geotechnical, and palaeoenvironmental methods as well as focused research programs. The majority of research in this field has to date been focused in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), hence in 2020 the INQUA SPLOSH working group was set up with a specific Southern Hemisphere (SH) focus. The goal of SPLOSH is to highlight the SH not only as a different geographical and environmental region but also with a different academic discourse that is inclusive of Indigenous science knowledge and pedagogies.
Key questions include:
1. How does the greater oceanic area of the SH influence the nature and preservation of submerged landscapes, and how these are studied?
2. How can we incorporate concerns, interests, knowledge, traditions, and perspectives of First Nations people in submerged landscapes research?
3. How do different biogeographical perspectives from the SH influence our understanding of human migration and past coastal resource use?
4. What new challenges and opportunities can arise from SPLOSH.
This session provides an opportunity to share research and knowledge on submerged sites and landscapes in the SH, the challenges and opportunities it presents, as well as mapping out future directions for interdisciplinary
research and collaboration in this region and as part of UNESCOs Decade of Ocean Sciences (2021-2030).

Conveners:
Fabrizio Antonioli, Institute of environmental geology and geoengineering (IGAG), Italy, fabrizioantonioli2@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Vincenza Forgia, Dipartimento Culture e Società, Università di Palermo, Italy
Claudia Speciale, Department of Historical Studies, University of Gothenburg, Sweden Maria Rita Palombo, Institute of environmental geology and geoengineering (IGAG), Italy

Scientific theme: 4B: Islands, continental bridges and drowned landscapes

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere; CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes

Abstract: During the Quaternary, some vertebrates lived on a variety of islands, from large to small, close to and far from the mainland. Their ancestors arrived at these islands mainly via chance dispersal, swimming across wide or narrow water barriers, rafting on floating vegetation, drifting with the aid of currents, or crossing over on discontinuous, temporarily emerged terrestrial bridges. The presence of two intriguing endemic hominin species on Flores (Homo floresiensis) and the Philippine islands (Homo luzonensis) rekindled the interest in the question of the first over-sea colonization of islands by humans, which some evidence dates back to the Middle Pleistocene on some Aegean islands during sea level lowstands. Available evidence suggests that the first seafarers colonized Sahul and Australia around 48 ka BP, and the time of the first navigation in the Mediterranean offers further chance for the debate. To provide some answers and investigate whether the unique characteristics of islands and their fauna influenced the mode and rate of human peopling and successful settlement, it is suitable to develop an integrated study, combining data from seemingly distant disciplines (e.g., palaeogeography, climatology, archaeology, archaeobotany and oceanography). Calculating relative (eustatic, isostatic, and tectonic) sea level changes is crucial for understanding both the possible connections with the continent and the distance from the
continent over time.

4C- Palaeoecology as a tool for ecosystem management

Conveners:
Stephen T. Jackson, US Geological Survey and University of Arizona, USA, jackson@uwyo.edu, (lead convener) Damien Fordham, University of Adelaide, Australia
Hien Ngo, UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) David Nogues-Bravo, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Scientific theme: 4C: Palaeoecology as a tool for ecosystem management

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: Formal scientific assessment of the causes and impacts of environmental change is a critical process by which science informs environmental policy. Assessments have been done on a variety of topics, including climate change, biodiversity, ozone, and ecosystem services, and at scales ranging from local and regional to national and global. The Quaternary sciences focus on the drivers, interactions, and consequences of past environmental changes, and hence are highly relevant to assessments of ongoing and future environmental change. For the past three decades, Quaternary scientists have played important roles in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). However, other assessments, including the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA) and the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), have seen much less participation and contribution from the Quaternary sciences. This session will explore how Quaternary sciences can contribute to assessment of biodiversity, ecosystems, and nature, including linking archeological and paleoecological knowledge with traditional ecological knowledge. We will bring together scientists with diverse perspectives and experience
to discuss challenges and opportunities at the science/policy boundary.

Conveners:
Lindsey Gillson, Plant Conservation Unit, University of Cape Town, South Africa, lindsey.gillson@uct.ac.za, (lead convener)
Willy Tinner, Institute of Plant Sciences, University of Bern, Switzerland

Scientific theme: 4C: Palaeoecology as a tool for ecosystem management

INQUA commission(s):
HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere;

Abstract: The UN’s decade of restoration ecology (2021-2031) represents a commitment to restoring ecosystems and ecological function at the global level. However, in many cases it is difficult to define appropriate restoration goals because reference conditions are lacking. Specifically, the degree of ecosystem transformation is often unknown. Increasing human impact through industrialisation, and intensive agriculture over past centuries has disrupted ecosystem functions, including biodiversity loss, increased erosion and changes in hydrological function, which have affected ecosystem service provision. In addition, customary management of fire and herbivory has been disrupted. Long-term information from palaeoecology can contribute useful information for contextualising recent changes in biodiversity and providing reference conditions relative to key anthropogenic milestones and past warm events. Furthermore, the move towards future conditions with no past analogue creates challenges for restoration ecology, in that a return to former conditions may be neither possible nor desirable. In these cases, palaeoecology can contribute to a process-based understanding of ecosystem processes and resilience, which can in turn guide management that considers restores resilience and adaptive capacity, while considering cultural
context, or in choosing between scenarios that resist accept or direct change.

4D- Human environment in the (paleo-) Anthropocene

Conveners:
Andrea Zerboni, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra “A. Desio”, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy, andrea.zerboni@unimi.it, (lead convener)
Kathleen Nicoll, Department of Geography, University of Utah, USA

Scientific theme: 4D: Human environment in the (paleo-) Anthropocene

INQUA commission(s):
TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The informal term Anthropocene indicates the geologic timeframe or event when humans became impactful agents of change on Earth, permanently altering ecosystems, landscapes, and hydroclimatic cycles. The definition of a formal geological era called Anthropocene is debated, but in this session, we want to focus on the geoarchaeological evidence of the inceptions of impactful human agency on environments. We invite papers that document such changes, and addressing these questions: When did the (palaeo-)Anthropocene start? What is the evidence for its deep antiquity? Can we recognize the Anthropocene stratigraphically? How far back in time can the human footprint be recognized? What are the archaeological, geomorphological, and sedimentary evidence for the inception of the Anthropocene? What new insights are emerging from the geoarchaeological record? How much have land use changes altered pristine environments? Do we have example of resilience of past societies in periods of environmental stress? What can we learn from the past in terms of sustainability and responsible use of natural environment? Today, can we identify pristine landscapes? How is the Anthropocene unfolding today? We aim at collecting papers reporting case studies from different regions and focusing on different time-periods, from the (deep) prehistory up to recent times, thus illustrating geoarchaeological examples of human overprint on the
environment and resilience of natural and human-impacted ecosystems.

Conveners:
Adele Bertini, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, University of Firenze, Italy, adele.bertini@unifi.it, (lead convener)
Nathalie Combourieu-Nebout, UMR 7194, CNRS-MNHN, Paris, France Yanni Gunnell, Université Lumière Lyon 2, Lyon, France
Odile Peyron, ISEM-CNRS Montpellier, France

Scientific theme: 4D: Human environment in the (paleo-) Anthropocene

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: Climate and humans have widely transformed environments, floristic assemblages and vegetation structure in most parts of the world, with varying impacts on resources and on human life and behavior. This session focuses on the Quaternary climatic and environmental records of global biodiversity hotspots. Modern hotspot regions, many of which include terrestrial and marine ecosystems in coastal zones and island environments (e.g., lagoons, wetlands, etc.), were deeply impacted by environmental change during recent millennia. The Mediterranean Basin is a well-documented example, but species richness and water resources are threatened in many other flagship regions. Ongoing pressures on these environments are also a threat to the preservation of the Quaternary record encoded in existing geological archives and documenting this record should be an important component of comprehensive conservation policies.
We welcome studies that report extreme climatic events or more gradual changes based on multi-proxy, long and/or high-resolution records inferred from biomarkers, environmental DNA, sediments, palaeohydrological indicators and/or climatic reconstructions, and geoarchaeological reconstructions linking environments with past human demographics or migrations over the last ~2.6 million years. Sites or areas associated with explicit heritage and conservation policy concerns, thus linking past environmental trajectories to relevance for the future, are of
special interest.

5- Climate record, processes and models

Conveners:
Sandy P. Harrison, University of Reading, UK, s.p.harrison@reading.ac.uk, (lead convener) Jenn Marlon, Yale University, USA
Anne-Laure Daniau, Université de Bordeaux, France
Angelica Feurdean, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History
HABCOM-Humans & BiosphereM

Abstract: There are many tools to reconstruct past changes in fire regime, at individual sites, across regions and at global scales. Considerable effort has been made to compile records so that they can be used to document past changes in wildfire regimes and, through comparison with other palaeoenvironmental data, to understand the causes and consequences of past changes in fire regimes. New analytical approaches are making it possible to distinguish, for example, changes in fire occurrence from changes in fire intensity. Calibration techniques have been developed that allow quantitative reconstructions of different aspects of the fire regime to be made.
Statistical and modelling tools have been developed that allow quantitative relationships between changes in fire regime and the climatic, vegetation and human drivers of these changes to be established in a robust way. There are also new approaches to evaluating the environmental and societal consequences of changes in palaeofire regimes. The aim of this session is to bring together the palaeodata, experimental and modelling communities to explore what we have learnt about palaeofire regimes during the Late Quaternary at regional to global scales, and the insights this provides for understanding how fire regimes might respond to future climate changes. In addition
to submissions about these new approaches, we encourage submissions comparing different types of record, or observations and modelling of past fire regimes.

Conveners:
Maria F. Sanchez Goñi, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (EPHE, PSL) and Université de Bordeaux, France, maria- fernanda.sanchez-goni@ephe.psl.eu, (lead convener)
Dulce Oliveira, CCMAR, Centro de Ciências do Mar, Portugal Dunia Urrego, University of Exeter, UK
Nils Weitzel, University of Heidelberg, Germany

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract:

Climate is a complex and non-linear system that depends on the mean state of the atmosphere that, in turn, depends on the dynamics of Earth’s other main reservoirs, i.e. cryosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and lithosphere. Among them, vegetation plays an important role in modulating climate through physical, albedo and evapotranspiration, and geochemical processes, the later affecting the carbon cycle through photosynthesis. Thus, documenting changes in vegetation cover and composition at orbital and millennial timescales is paramount to understand past and modern global and regional climates and their underlying forcings. Moreover, from changes in vegetation we can infer changes in the mean state of the atmosphere (temperature, precipitation and seasonality).

This session invites works presenting up-to-date spatial and temporal vegetation reconstructions based on paleontological and geochemical data, contributions using different modeling approaches and others combining both reconstructions and simulated vegetation for any Quaternary time interval and particularly for three key climatic periods: the Middle Pleistocene transition, the Mid Brunhes Event and the highly variable Last Glacial.

Conveners:
Celia Martin Puertas, Royal Holloway University of London, UK, celia.martinpuertas@rhul.ac.uk, (lead convener) Adrian Palmer, Royal Holloway University of London, UK
Cecile Blanchet, GFZ-Potsdam, Gerrmany Maurycy Żarczyński, University of Gdańsk, Poland
Anna Becket, Royal Holloway University of London, UK Bernd Zolitschka, University of Bremen, Germany

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Understanding the Earth’s climate system and environmental responses to changing conditions in the past is key to contextualise the current climate change and inform our future.
Varved archives, i.e. annually laminated sedimentary records, have a wide spatial distribution, provide robust chronologies and generate high temporal resolution datasets of climate change that provide comprehension of both natural and human systems. These archives also have a high potential to deliver relevant information to a wide range of end users and decision makers that might help to address current societal challenges regarding global warming. This session welcomes contributions that use varves for (1) palaeo-weather reconstructions (seasonal, annual to decadal resolution) such as extreme weather events (e.g. flood, heat waves); (2) proxy development and proxy calibration to maximize the use of varved sediments in terms of quantitative reconstructions; (3) proxy-model comparison; (4) high-resolution palaeoecological studies to assess biodiversity trends; (5) delivering palaeo evidence to end users, e.g. environmental consultancies, climate services, policy makers. We also invite contributions about any other investigations of lacustrine and marine varves. This session
will constitute a contribution to the PAGES-endorsed “Varve Working Group”.

Conveners:
Armand Hernandez, Centro de Investigacións Científicas Avanzadas – CICA Dept. of Physics and Earth Sciences Universidade Da Coruña, Spain, armand.hernandez@udc.es, (lead convener)
Laura Boyall, Centre for Quaternary Research – Department of Geography, Royal Holloway University of London, UK
Paola Moffa-Sanchez, Geography Department, Durham University, Durham, UK
Celia Martin-Puertas, Centre for Quaternary Research – Department of Geography, Royal Holloway University of London, UK

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Climate signals recorded in natural archives by paleoenvironmental proxies provide a unique opportunity to study longer-term climate variability beyond observations. These proxy reconstructions, however, are often controlled by a combination of local, regional, and global climate which can result in spatio-temporal discrepancies across different proxy reconstructions. Disentangling these different controls is crucial to assess the ability of specific proxy data to capture the evolution of atmospheric and oceanic patterns that control climate variability on interannual to centennial timescales.
This session aims to discuss developments in proxy-based reconstructions of regional atmospheric and oceanic patterns (i.e., modes of climate variability) and to explore their large-scale teleconnections during the Quaternary period in general, and since the Last Glacial Maximum in particular. We invite contributions from any climate archives reconstructing regional patterns of climate variability at decadal to centennial time scales with special emphasis on: 1) multiproxy approaches and/or data-model comparison studies that can elucidate the mechanisms controlling the proxy-based climate signals; 2) proxy calibration shedding light on how these proxies may be controlled by the atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns associated with past climate changes; 3) proxy
development (e.g. statistical approaches); and 4) regional proxy integration.

Conveners:
Coralie Zorzi, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Université de Bordeaux, France, coralie.zorzi@u-bordeaux.fr, (lead convener)
Dulce Oliveira, CCMAR-Centro de Ciências do Mar do Algarve, Portugal Qiuzhen Yin, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium
Francien Peterse, Universiteit Utrecht, Netherlands

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Monsoons are complex systems involving coupled atmosphere-ocean-land interactions that exert a major impact on global and regional climates. Alarmingly, the uncertainty in monsoon precipitation projections is still high, and therefore unrevealing its natural variability over the past is of paramount importance. Paleoclimate studies are crucial for investigating the sensitivity of tropical climate to external forcings and the nature of internal variability whereas climate simulations enable the discrimination of the physical mechanisms underlying the monsoon dynamics. Hence, a better understanding of the mechanisms driving the monsoon natural variability requires an integrating approach combining proxy data and climate models at various spatial and time scales.
This session invites contributions from all regional monsoon areas, including Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Australia-Indonesia and America, based on proxy records, climate models and data-model comparisons during the
Plio-Pleistocene at different timescales (from orbital to millennial and centennial timescales).

Conveners:
Louise C. Sime, British Antarctic Survey, UK, lsim@bas.ac.uk, (lead convener) Sandy P. Harrison, University of Reading, UK
Kira Rehfeld, Tübingen University, Germany
Irene Malmierca-Vallet, British Antarctic Survey, UK

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes

Abstract: The Dansgaard-Oecheger (D-O) events are a classic example of rapid climate changes, marking the transition between cold stadials and warmer interstadials in Greenland during the last glacial. The fingerprint of these events is seen in marine and terrestrial records globally. There is broad agreement that D-O events are triggered by changes in ocean circulation, but many uncertainties about the role of interactions and feedbacks between various components of the Earth System in shaping the magnitude and duration of D-O events.
Furthermore, there is limited understanding of how D-O events are registered over the continents and whether land-atmosphere interactions might influence D-O events. Climate models can be used to investigate the different mechanisms involved, but it is still unclear whether these models are intrinsically too stable to produce realistic simulations of D-O events or that models that do produce D-O like oscillations do so for the right reasons and capture the observed patterns and magnitude of the climate changes. Nevertheless, the ability to simulate abrupt transitions of this sort is crucial for being able to address questions about future tipping points in the climate system. This session will provide an opportunity to assess recent progress in documenting observed climate changes during D-O events, to evaluate the state of knowledge about model behaviour during these abrupt
events, and to facilitate comparison of the observations and model simulations.

Conveners:
James Shulmeister, University of Canterbury, New Zealand, james.shulmeister@canterbury.ac.nz, (lead convener) Kathryn Fitzsimmons, University of Tuebingen, Germany
Jasper Knight, University of Witwatersrand, South Africa Lydia MacKenzie, Zhejiang University, China
Craig Sloss, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: The Southern Hemisphere is a critical but still under studied part of the global climate system. This session aims to bring new insights into climate change from across the hemisphere focusing on the period leading up to and including the Last Glacial Maximum. The session invites both paleodata and modelling studies from across all latitudes and both terrestrial and marine environments. This session commemorates the life and career of Dr Lynda Petherick who died unexpectedly in February 2022. She was a driving force behind research into climate change during the LGM in the Southern Hemisphere. She undertook pioneering work on using dust records for reconstructing atmospheric circulation and was the leader of the Southern Hemisphere Last Glacial Maximum
(SHeMax) project.

Conveners:
Laurie Menviel, Climate Change Research Centre, UNSW Sydney, Australia, l.menviel@unsw.edu.au, (lead convener)
Ruza Ivanovic, School of Earth & Environment, University of Leeds, UK Lorraine Lisiecki, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Heather Stoll, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Emilie Capron, Université de Grenoble, France
Julia Gottschalk, Institute of Geosciences, Kiel University, Germany

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Glacial terminations, i.e. transitions from a glacial to an interglacial state, represent intervals of strong natural global warming and large-scale climate reorganizations across the Quaternary. Positive feedbacks within the Earth’s system involving the global carbon cycle, ice-sheet dynamics and oceanic circulation played a significant role in shaping the timing and amplitude of glacial terminations. This session invites contributions from studies that provide an improved understanding of the processes and feedbacks occurring during glacial terminations of the last 500 kyrs. This includes both new paleo-proxy records, data syntheses and numerical simulations providing new constraints on changes in climate, global carbon cycle, continental ice-sheets and sea-
level during glacial-interglacial transitions.

Conveners:
Willem G.M. van der Bilt, University of Bergen, Norway, willemvanderbilt@uib.no, (lead convener) Anders Schomacker, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway
Elizabeth K. Thomas, Department of Geology, University of Buffalo, NY, USA Yarrow Axford, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA
Sofia E. Kjellman, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: The Arctic changes faster than any other region on Earth, and is becoming both warmer and wetter at rates 3-4 times faster than the planetary average. This amplified response has global climate impacts as Arctic glacier loss spurs eustatic sea-level rise, increased meltwater run-off perturbs ocean circulation, while changes in snow and ice cover alter the planet’s surface albedo. Regionally, Arctic landscapes are transformed by changes in vegetation cover, permafrost-driven coastal erosion, and the increased incidence of geohazards such as floods and mass movements. Yet despite their ramifications and significance for adaption strategies, the future trajectory of these changes remains uncertain. By providing empirical constraints, paleoclimate data from warmer-than-present intervals are well-suited to help close this critical knowledge gap. This session hosts such contributions from both proxy- and model-based approaches. With this session we would like to advance ongoing discussions about the emerging new Arctic, for example whether solid precipitation increases might offset temperature-driven glacier melt. We are particularly keen to highlight studies that contextualize regional climate heterogeneities, work that present method innovations with potential to advance the current state-of-the-art, as well as reconstructions from
particularly under-investigated Arctic areas.

Conveners:
Upasana Swaroop Banerji, National Centre for Earth Science Studies (NCESS), Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India, India, upasana.s.banerji@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Kumar Batuk Joshi, National Centre for Earth Science Studies (NCESS), Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India, India
Chandra Prakash Dubey, National Centre for Earth Science Studies (NCESS), Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India, India
Laxmi Pandey, CSIR-National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad-500007, Telangana, India

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: The concept of climate dynamics and its future trends has remained inherently difficult due to limited observational records. Such intellectual challenges in the climate system can be rendered through paleoclimate reconstruction. The paleoclimate is intrinsically linked with paleoweathering and paleoprovenance which has been decrypted through the geochemical variations in the sediments. The multiproxy approach on sediments have been an indispensable tool providing integrated signals of climatic variation vis-à-vis weatheringand provenance changes. The comparison of trends and curves in paleoclimate proxies remain perplexing and complicated. But on transforming time series data into frequency domain using spectral analysis remarkably unveil the plausible mechanism led to climate variability. In addition, the complex time series data can be further dealt through machine learning technique without involving any mathematical relation. Despite extensive efforts, the linkage with ocean-atmospheric processes and natural forcing with global climate system remains delusive while the attempts on spectral analysis and machine learning techniques remains restricted. Thus, the present session invites contribution towards the reconstruction of paleoclimate, paleoweathering and paleoprovenance along with its implication through spectral analysis and machine learning using multiproxy approach on sediments.

Conveners:
Denis-Didier Rousseau, Geosciences Montpellier, CNRS-University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York, USA, denis-didier.rousseau@umontpellier.fr, (lead convener)
France Lagroix, Institut de Physique du Globe, Université Paris Cité, Paris, France Peter Hopcroft, School of Geography, Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK
Christine Hatté, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, CEA-University Paris Saclay, Saclay, France Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Pierre Antoine, Laboratoire de Géographie physique, CNRS-University Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne, Meudon

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Loess deposits are the accumulation of eolian dust during cold periods of the Quaternary and are widespread across the Earth. Alternating with fossil soils they form loess-paleosol sequences (LPS) recording climate variations that find their counterpart in marine and ice records. Although there is a general agreement that the loess–paleosol alternation is mainly driven by orbital parameters, more detailed investigation, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, has shown that millennial scale variability can also be recorded. These new observations result from analytical developments building on the definition of new proxies, new dating techniques, new protocols. Evidence is emerging that the majority of loess deposits has regional to local sources, implying a notion of regional context that has yet to be properly investigated. Acquiring high-resolution LPS has helped comparing loess records with other high-resolution terrestrial, marine and ice records, further defining the concept of paleodust, which is the necessary step to allow comparison with models. However, modeling paleodust is predominantly focused on the Last Glacial Maximum or the Holocene periods and few attempts to model older time intervals have been made. This session will provide an opportunity to assess recent progress in loess studies, especially documenting observed abrupt changes, to evaluate the state of knowledge about paleodust modeling,
and to facilitate comparison of observations and model simulations.

Conveners:
Biljana Narancic, Université Laval, Canada, biljana.narancic.1@ulaval.ca, (lead convener) Slobodan Gnjato, University of Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Dermot Antoniades, Université Laval, Canada Reinhard Pienitz, Université Laval, Canada

Scientific theme: Paleoclimatology (5 – Climate record, processes and models)

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: The past 2000 years deliver important setting for our comprehension of recent human forcing of the climate, as well as information about climate variability. In that period, the Balkan Peninsula have experienced substantial climatic and ecological changes. In order to provide a better understanding of past environmental change dynamics and climate variability in the past 2000 years, we invite presentations which cover a wide range of paleodisciplines from various paleoclimate archives (marine and lacustrine sediments, terrestrial records, speleothems and others). Main focus of the session is to bring together paleoenvironmental reconstructions of ecosystem responses to external forcing that cover various regions of the Balkan Peninsula. Generating and sharing new paleoenvironmental data will provide an opportunity to fill long-standing knowledge gaps on climate and environmental change over recent centuries to millennia, in one of the least covered regions of the Europe.

Conveners:
Barbara Stenni, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice , Italy, barbara.stenni@unive.it, (lead convener) Amaelle Landais, LSCE, France
Carlo Barbante, CNR-ISP and Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy Emilie Capron, Institut des Géosciences de l’Environnement, France Pascal Bohleber, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: The last IPCC report highlighted the remaining large uncertainties in the future evolution of the cryosphere with direct consequences on global sea level rise. Understanding the past climate variability and sensitivity from glacial archives is thus fundamental for placing the current changes in a longer-term context. The scientific ice core community is currently putting an enormous effort towards (1) retrieving the oldest continuous ice core from Antarctica (Project Beyond EPICA) and (2) training a new generation of ice core scientists capable of analyzing, interpreting, and modelling the new records that will be obtained (ITN DEEPICE project). In addition, the ice cores retrieved in high-altitude/low-latitude glaciers are offering a wealth of paleoclimate information covering the last centuries and millennia, preserved in what it is called the third pole. This session welcomes contributions reporting new results or data/model studies related to ice cores drilled in both polar regions and mid-low latitude glaciers and covering temporal scales spanning from the last decades to glacial-interglacial cycles. Contributions presenting novel techniques for (1) analyzing new proxies and increasing their resolution, (2) interpreting the paleoclimate records with new statistical techniques, (3) understanding the post-depositional processes potentially affecting the integrity of the records as well as new tools for (4) for dating and (5) modelling
paleoclimatic signals, are welcomed.

Conveners:
Christian Zeeden, Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics, Hannover, Germany, Christian.zeeden@leibniz-liag.de, (lead convener)
Shiling Yang, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China Janina Nett, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
Christoph Schmidt, University of Lausanne, Switzerland Daniel Veres, Institute of Speleology, Cluj-Napoca, Romania

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Loess is a widespread aeolian sediment. It covers wide areas, especially in Eurasia. Many studies establish valuable records of sedimentation history and sediment composition at single localities. However, dust deposits are often considered in singularity or only a few localities are compared which hinders the understanding of broad-scale environmental and paleoclimatic implications. The comparison and relation between several records at supra-regional and continental scale offers the opportunity to investigate environmental and climatic processes, which are often not well understood. Both reliable dating and high-resolution, proxy data are required to understand the dust dynamics and soil formation processes in the past, as recorded by loess and other dust deposits.
This session brings a large-scale image of loess research together – beyond local studies. Especially welcome are contributions utilizing novel methods (of both dating and proxy records), and studies covering large areas, or spanning a bridge between loess and other geoarchives (fluvial, lacustrine, marine).

Conveners:
Akash Srinivas, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, IISER Mohali, India, akashsrinivas123@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Aayush Srivastava, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of St Andrews, UK

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: Quaternary studies emerging from South Asia in recent years have generated huge datasets in several disciplines including geomorphology, palaeoclimatology, neo-tectonics, sea-level changes and geoarchaeology. Incorporating these datasets into the global ones are not just enhancing our understanding of global events and their teleconnections but are also challenging older theories and models. However, until recently, this region (South Asia) which is located somewhat centrally in the Afro-Eurasian landmass was only considered peripherally, if at all. The range of variable landforms, geographical features, climatic regions and ecotones, coupled with its diverse and deep-rooted cultural trajectories, help create an ideal laboratory to understand and investigate various facets of our Quaternary past and processes.
As such, this session seeks interdisciplinary contributions and specific case studies that generate palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic datasets from South Asia and deploy various approaches and tools to incorporate these datasets to enhance our understanding of global Quaternary events. Topics related, but not limited, to the application of various scientific methods including biotic and abiotic proxies (such as isotopes, micropalaeontology, palynology, chronology, biomolecules etc) and other, the integration of the rich terrestrial and aquatic monsoon and climate records, and palaeoanthropological and archaeological evidences being
incorporated to tackling discourses related to human evolution and migration, the impact of anthropogenic activities on the environment and others, are welcomed to be discussed in this session.

Conveners:
Alessio Rovere, DAIS, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy, alessio.rovere@unive.it, (lead convener)
April Sue Rogers Dalton, Faculty of Science Department of Physical Geography and Geoecology, Charles University, Czech Republic
Deirdre D. Ryan, DST, University of Pisa, Italy
Roger Creel, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, USA Graham Rush, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, UK Natasha Barlow, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, UK

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Understanding paleo relative sea-level indicators (e.g. shore platforms, coral reef terraces, beach deposits, etc.) is key to gauging paleoclimatic change and documenting physical responses to glacial- and hydro- isostatic adjustments and other regional earth surface processes. Quantifying these processes is essential for accurate projection of future sea-level changes. This session welcomes contributions to the global record of Cenozoic sea-level indicators (not limited to peak interglacial periods) and associated proxies from a variety of coastal environments, as well as constraints on paleo ice sheets and new approaches to constraining future sea- level projections with sea-level indicators. We also welcome studies that aim to improve the development, interpretation, and integration of these indicators. These data are critical for reducing uncertainties in paleo sea- level estimates and ice sheet extents and for producing projections that accurately attribute future sea-level changes to ice sheets, ocean thermal expansion, and other global and regional processes. This session falls within the purview of PALSEA (PALeo constraints on SEA level rise), a PAGES-INQUA Working Group, and the projects WARMCOASTS and RISeR (ERC StG, funded under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation
Programme, grants 802414 and 802281).

Conveners:
Kathryn Fitzsimmons, University of Tübingen, Germany, kathryn.fitzsimmons@uni-tuebingen.de, (lead convener) Monika Markowska, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Germany; Kira Rehfeld; University of Tübingen, Germany; kira.rehfeld@uni-tuebingen.de – Georgy Falster; Australian National University, Australia; georgina.falster@anu.edu.au – Pavani Misra; IIT Kanpur, India; pavani.1904@gmail.com

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Water is central to life on Earth. Changes in precipitation frequency, intensity, seasonality, and amount relative to evapotranspiration significantly impact on both human societies and ecological systems over long and short timescales. Extreme events such as floods, droughts and wildfires can have devastating consequences.
Anthropogenically driven climate change is projected to considerably alter global hydroclimate, intensifying the hydrological cycle. So far, however, our understanding of the response of terrestrial rainfall patterns to anthropogenic forcing remains poor.
Sedimentary archives of past climates provide important insights into how hydroclimate varies internally within a system, and how it responds to natural perturbations in external forcing over a range of temporal and spatial scales. However, proxy records do not provide a complete picture of hydroclimate dynamics; for this we turn to long-term climate model simulations. This session aims to bring together researchers working on various terrestrial archives to generate quantitative reconstructions of past hydroclimate variability across scales, with researchers investigating hydroclimate variability in long model simulations. We particularly welcome cross- disciplinary submissions integrating climate reconstructions and model simulations, as well as research focusing on new tools for generating hydroclimatic datasets, proxy-model comparisons, proxy data syntheses, and proxy
systems models.

Conveners:
Andrea Columbu, Parma University, Italy, andrea.columbu@unipr.it, (lead convener) Valdir Novello, University of Tübingen, Germany
Barbara Wortham, NOAA Climate and Global Change, USA
Yassine Ait Brahim, Mohammed VI Polytechnic University, Benguerir, Morocco Micheline Campbell, ANSTO, Lucas Heights, Australia

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Cave deposits efficiently record past climatic and environmental conditions. Either clastic sediments or chemically precipitated deposits (speleothems) can indeed retain important insights about variation in temperatures, rainfall amount and source, seasonality, vegetation and soil status, hydrology as well as many other key-aspects of the Quaternary Period. This is accomplished throughout the study of physic-bio-geochemical, petro- mineralogic and sediment-stratigraphic characteristic of cave deposits, which can be rigidly anchored to low- uncertainty geochronology thanks to the modern dating techniques (ie. U-Th, U-Pb, 14C, OSL, etc.). Furthermore, the association of these geological archives with models can help to improve the understanding of Quaternary conditions from a regional to a global perspective. This session welcomes cave-deposit based novel studies with special regard to those presenting: 1) chronologies for key Quaternary events, 2) new records from underrepresented Quaternary time-slices and/or geographical areas; 3) novel palaeoclimate/environment proxies and/or techniques; 4) Models using data in global repository (ie. SISAL, NOAA, etc) and 5) cave monitoring. The aim of this session is to summarise and possibly update the state of the art of Quaternary palaeoclimate-
environment research based on cave deposits from a multi-disciplinary perspective, as well as discuss the potential scientific directions for the near future.

Conveners:
Kevin Anchukaitis, University of Arizona, USA, kanchukaitis@arizona.edu, (lead convener) Michael Sigl, University of Bern, Switzerland
Francis Ludlow, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland Celine Vidal, University of Cambridge, UK Allegra LeGrande, NASA GISS, USA
Matthew Toohey, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: Volcanic eruptions can inject large amounts of material into the atmosphere, which affects the Earth’s climate system and human societies on across a range of spatial and temporal scales. This session will highlight novel results and insights emerging from interdisciplinary and collaborative efforts on the interactions between volcanic eruptions, climate variability and change, extreme events in the Earth system, and the history and archaeology of human society. We invite contributions focusing on one or more of the following topis: reconstruction of the climate and environmental consequences following eruptions, the effects imprinted in individual proxy records as well as proxy compilations, the analysis of volcanic effects using climate modeling experiments, and interdisciplinary research that seeks to understand how and to which extent volcanic eruptions
contributed to shaping past societal changes.

Conveners:
Amy Prendergast, University of Melbourne, Australia, amy.prendergast@unimelb.edu.au, (lead convener)

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Understanding past climate and environmental change at high-resolution timescales (annual to sub- annual) is important as it allows current and future climate change to be contextualized within long-term frameworks; it provides data for numerical simulations that will allow climate modellers to better predict anthropogenic impacts on the natural climate system; and it facilitates evaluations of the relationship between past environmental changes and human behaviour. In the past decade, advances in technology, methodology, model development, and proxy calibration have enabled the extraction of more robust palaeoenvironmental records from marine, freshwater, and terrestrial palaeoenvironmental archives. Many of these archives including mollusc shells, corals, otoliths, speleothems, and tree rings have periodic growth increments. Studying the growth and chemistry of these increments allows the reconstruction of high-resolution, temporally constrained palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironmental data from varied regions of the globe and are allowing correlations between continental and marine systems. This session invites presentations on high-resolution climate and environmental records from marine, terrestrial and freshwater archives. We encourage contributions on both
palaeoenvironmental reconstructions, and proxy calibration studies.

Conveners:
Timothy Barrows, University of Wollongong, Australia and University of Portsmouth, UK, Tim.Barrows@uow.edu.au, (lead convener)
Helen Bostock, University of Queensland, Australia
John Tibby, University of Adelaide, Australia
Haidee Cadd, University of Wollongong, Australia
Paul Hesse, Macquarie University, Australia

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Australasia lies at an important crossroads on the planet. To the north lies the tropical Indo-Pacific warm pool, the warmest stretch of water on Earth. To the south lies the Southern Ocean and the ice sheets of Antarctica. Australasia covers almost all climatic zones and environments from rainforests to deserts, from glaciated mountains to low lying coastal plains, and from coral reefs to the deep ocean. Some of these regions preserve continuous paleoclimate records in lakes, speleothems, and deep marine environments, while others only provide intermittent data such as moraines, sand dunes, fluvial deposits and lake shorelines. This can create major gaps and challenges for understanding past climate variability. This session will focus on developments that meet the challenges that have hindered understanding of Australasian climate and environmental changes. In particular, we invite presentations that focus on making estimates of climate more quantitative and improving chronologies of climate change. We particularly welcome presentations from Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific on climate change from the last glacial maximum through to the late Holocene. We also encourage regional model-
data comparisons.

Conveners:
Timothy Shanahan, Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, USA, tshanahan@jsg.utexas.edu, (lead convener)
Paul Augustinus, School of Environment, The University of Auckland, New Zealand

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: The Southern Hemisphere westerly winds (SWW) are a crucial component of the climate of the southern mid-latitudes and play a critical role in the circulation of the Southern Ocean and the global carbon cycle.
However, their remain uncertainties about the nature and causes of past changes in the westerlies. This session seeks contributions using proxies and models to improve our understanding of past changes in the climate of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies and the causes of these changes on orbital, millennial, and centennial timescales. We welcome new proxy reconstructions of the SWW, proxy data syntheses, and climate model simulations as well
as studies that integrate proxy data and modeling over a range of spatial and temporal scales.

Conveners:
Roberta D’Agostino, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, University of Trento, Italy, roberta.dagostino@mpimet.mpg.de, (lead convener)
Ellen Berntell, Stockholm University, Sweden
Davide Zanchettin, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy Amos Winter, Indiana State University, USA

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes

Abstract: Warm climates are generally associated with an intensification of the global hydrological cycle compared to current conditions. However, changes in regional land-atmosphere feedbacks and dynamic processes such as inter-hemispheric and land-ocean thermal contrasts contribute to shape a complex and uncertain spatial pattern of the Global Monsoon response to global warming. Past periods such as the Early Eocene, the Mid-Pliocene, the Last Interglacial, and the Mid-Holocene provide the opportunity to explore monsoonal dynamics under warm climate states, using indirect evidences from proxy-based paleoclimate reconstructions and paleoclimate model simulations. In this session we aim at gathering together paleoclimatologists and climate modelers to discuss recent advances in the characterisation and understanding of monsoon dynamics in warm climates. We welcome contributions about new proxy-based results and new methods to reconstruct monsoon rainfall, especially high- resolution proxy data that allow exploring sub-centennial variability of individual monsoonal systems.
Contributions about tropical and monsoon dynamics from paleoclimate simulations, including results from model intercomparisons under initiatives such as PMIP are also welcome. We are especially interested in comparative
assessments of simulations and reconstructions that highlight major gaps of knowledge about mean state and spatio-temporal variability of the global monsoon under warm climates.

Conveners:
Julieta Massaferro, CENAC/CONICET, Argentina, jmassaferro@comahue-conicet.gob.ar, (lead convener) Christoph Mayr, Institut für Geographie FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
Nicolas Waldmann, Dept. of Marine Geosciences University of Haifa, Israel

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Recent investigations have shown that the Southern Hemisphere (SH) play an important role in the regulation of the global climate and may have triggered some of the major climate changes during the past glacial– interglacial period. However, there is still conflicting evidence for the degree and mode of hemispheric ‘teleconnections’ and to the principle of forcing mechanisms. The available hypotheses are difficult to be reliably tested because the few detailed palaeoclimatic records in the Southern Hemisphere are widely dispersed highlighting the need for additional, well-dated, high-resolution post-LGM paleoclimate data from the Southern Hemisphere. For instance, long-term shifts in atmospheric circulation patterns that in turn are linked to continental droughts and wildfires, changes in the Southern Ocean carbon sink, volcanic eruptions, sea ice extent and ocean circulation, are topics increasingly significant but poorly studied in the SH. We invite contributions from multiple proxy-related disciplines tackling the response of lakes to changes in the complex climate system of the SH from glacial periods to the Anthropocene.

Conveners:
Zdzisław Jary, Department of Physical Geography, University of Wrocław, Poland, zdzislaw.jary@uwr.edu.pl, (lead convener)
Pierre Antoine, Laboratoire de Géographie Physique, Environnements Quaternaires et Actuels, France Kaja Fenn, Geography and Planning Department, University of Liverpool, UK
Shiling Yang, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The meaning and the formal definition of the term “loess” still remain controversial. This is mainly due to the great variety of sedimentary settings, accumulation of aeolian dust from various sources, and climatic influences. This has already been evidenced in Europe where extensive late Pleistocene loess-palaeosols sequences (LPS) showed notable differences between the northern and southern branches of the so-called “European Loess Belt”. For instance, the depositional environments of the Middle Danube Basin, characterised by almost continuous dust deposition, differed substantially from the depositional environments of the North European Loess Belt where LPS were influenced by rapid environmental changes within a periglacial zone including ice-rich permafrost. Examples of diversity in loess sedimentary environments have also been reported in Asia, North and South America, Africa and result from different tectonic, geomorphic and climatic settings. This session will focus on a spatial reconstruction of the diversity of loess environments and the identification of key drivers of the diversity from LPSs around the world using robust and high resolution chronologies. It will gather contributions focusing on: i) dating (absolute and marker horizons) and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions combining multi- proxy approaches of Late Pleistocene LPS; and ii) dust sources including the relationship between large river systems and loess deposits.

Conveners:
Charlotte Skonieczny, Université Paris-Saclay, CNRS, GEOPS, France, charlotte.skonieczny@université-paris- saclay.fr, (lead convener)
Marie Revel, Université Côte d’Azur, CNRS, OCA, IRD, Geoazur, Valbonne, France Cécile Blanchet, German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ Potsdam, Germany

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: During the Quaternary, variations of insolation over the African continent have driven large swings in monsoon dynamic, as evidenced in the paleorecords by alternations of arid and humid periods. These hydroclimatic and atmospheric circulation changes led to vast transformation of the Saharan landscapes with the waxing and waning of rivers, lakes and tropical vegetation in a currently hyperarid region. Various levels of linearity in the magnitude and speed of these changes question the processes driving the switches in hydroclimate state and the role of feedbacks, tipping points or specific thresholds. This session aims to bring together researchers reconstructing these hydroclimatic and atmospheric changes in order to advance our understanding of the mechanisms and temporalities of the response of environments to climatic changes. We welcome contributions aiming to characterise both arid and humid periods and addressing a wide range of temporal variabilities from orbital to inter-annual. Similarly, we encourage contributions from various approaches (observations, modelling), archives (marine, continental) and proxies (organic, inorganic), with a particular interest for research integrating these different components. Studies linking African hydroclimates with other monsoon systems or higher latitudes are welcome. In this session, we particularly encourage submissions from early-career
scientists as well as scientists from under-represented populations in the geosciences.

Conveners:
Henrieka Detlef, Aarhus University, Denmark, henrieka.detlef@geo.au.dk, (lead convener)
Antje Voelker, Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera & CCMAR, University Algarve, Portugal Flavio Anselmetti, University of Bern, Switzerland

Scientific theme: 5: Climate record, processes and models

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: International scientific drilling efforts, including but not limited to the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), provide unique resources to study Earth’s dynamics. In combination with established and novel analytical techniques, they hold invaluable information on past climates and environments, geo-/natural hazards, ecosystem changes, and the deep biosphere. This session will focus on recent advancements and upcoming projects in scientific drilling across the Quaternary, including the Plio-Pleistocene transition. We invite contributions on recent results in the fields of Quaternary studies, such as paleoceanography, climate sciences, ecology, paleobiology, geomicrobiology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, chronology, natural hazards, and human impact. Additionally, we encourage contributions that provide perspectives on future scientific drilling projects to improve our understanding of the Quaternary Period.

5A- Climate proxies

Conveners:
Roberta Pini, CNR-IGAG, Italy, roberta.pini@igag.cnr.it, (lead convener)
Barbara Delmonte, Dept. Environmental and Earth Sciences, Univ. Milano Bicocca, Italy
Gábor Újvári, Inst. for Geological and Geochemical Research, Research Center for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Science, Hungary

Scientific theme: 5A: Climate proxies

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is the most recent period in Earth’s history of maximum globally- integrated ice volume. Sea level oscillations are pinpointed by thousands of far-field data, setting the global LGM chronological boundaries into a robust frame. But what about its regional configuration and dynamics? Ice cores, terrestrial and marine sequences are valuable archives of the past and provide a wealth of qualitative and quantitative proxies for landscape evolution and atmosphere composition. These records are essential to decline at regional scale the effects of global climate fluctuations.
This session welcomes contributions from researchers working on the LGM history of climate and ecosystems in different sedimentary realms. The signals of well-established and new physical, biological, and chemical proxies will help building connections across different regions and establishing correlations between records, and answer the following questions:
(i) which was the regional expression of the global reorganizations of atmospheric circulation during the LGM?
(ii) were those fluctuations synchronous at global scale?
(iii) which is the visibility of stadial-interstadial climate variability in marine and terrestrial records?
The importance of techniques for the reconstruction of past climate and chemical parameters will be discussed.

Conveners:
Steve Pratte, School of Earth Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, pratte.steve@zju.edu.cn, (lead convener)
François De Vleeschouwer, Instituto Franco-Argentino para el Estudio del Clima y sus Impactos (UMI IFAECI/CNRS- CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires, Argentina
Nicolas J. Cosentino, Instituto de Geografía, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile Stefania Gili, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton, USA

Scientific theme: 5A: Climate proxies

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Mineral dust aerosols play an important role in global climate and have significant implications on the Earth’s radiative balance, cloud properties, atmospheric chemistry and fertilization of terrestrial ecosystems. The chemistry, mineralogy, size distribution and shape of dust particles are important factors that affect and control its climatic and environmental impact. Thus, the properties of dust deposited in different geological archives (ice cores, loess, peat bogs, etc.) are a vital climatic proxy for a better understanding of changes in atmospheric circulation and/or surface conditions. Additionally, while great advances have been done in the understanding of global dust-climate interactions, several discrepancies still remain among different models and between models and observations.
This session covers topics related to the global dust cycle and dust-climate interactions. Key themes include (i) dust characterization (geochemistry, grain-size, mineralogy), (ii) dust emission, transport and deposition mechanisms, (iii) continental dust records, (iv) impacts of dust on the biogeochemical cycles of ecosystems and its connection to the C cycle, (v) dust climate models and, (vi) the use of novel and multi-proxy approaches for the reconstruction of climatic and environmental changes recorded in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

Conveners:
Charlotte Prud’homme, Institute of Earth Surface Dynamics, University of Lausanne, Switzerland, charlotte.prudhomme@unil.ch, (lead convener)
Thomas Stevens, Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden
Gábor Újvári, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research, Budapest, Hungary
Huayu Lu, The MOE Key Laboratory of Coast and Island Development, School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, China

Scientific theme: 5A: Climate proxies

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Loess sediments cover vast areas of the Earth’s surface and are widely used climate archives for reconstructing climate and atmospheric dustiness over centennial-millennial, orbital and tectonic timescales. Until recently, quantitative climate reconstructions from loess have been rare, but numerous new developments have allowed a range of quantitative climate proxies to be developed and applied to terrestrial archives. These proxies include brGDGTs, n-alkanes, mineral magnetic, carbon, oxygen and clumped isotope composition of secondary carbonates as proxies of temperature, precipitation and vegetation, as well as loess fabric analyses of wind directions, quantitative dust source assignments, and quantitative estimates of dust mass accumulation rates, based on independent absolute chronologies. Quantitative analysis of past climate, environment, and atmospheric dust is essential refining understanding of past climate and its forcing. This session focuses on all climate proxies that can be used to reconstruct the regional effects of past climate change on a quantitative basis. This includes temperature and precipitation, but also quantitative estimates of dust accumulation based on independent, absolute dating, dust source through provenance analyses, and wind speed or direction. We invite submissions from both technique development and application aspects. We encourage applications to loess and other terrestrial archives over a range of timescales and geographic areas.

Conveners:
Helle Astrid Kjær, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark and Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Australia, hellek@nbi.ku.dk, (lead convener)
Niklas Boers, Potsdam institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Germany
Denis Didier-Rousseau, Université Montpellier, Geosciences Montpellier, France Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York, USA Louise Sime, British Antarctic Survey (BAS), UK

Scientific theme: 5A: Climate proxies

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Abrupt transitions or tipping points occur in many components of the Earth System as a response to the crossing of critical forcing levels, and are recorded in Quaternary proxy archives. Subsystems known to potentially experience tipping behavior (Tipping Elements) are the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, the polar ice sheets and sea ice, tropical and boreal forests, Permafrost, Asian monsoon and more. Many of these are known to also influence each other opening the possibility for so-called tipping cascades.
Here we focus on the empirical proxy basis for systems experiencing the crossing of critical thresholds causing an abrupt and potentially irreversible system reorganization occurring on the broad Quaternary scale, in both past warm and cold climates.
We also welcome synthesis and synchronization between different proxy records that enhances the dynamical understanding of tipping events, especially studies investigating the interactions between the different Tipping Elements and possible cascading or stabilizing effects of such interactions.
This interdisciplinary session invites contributions that address Tipping Points in the Earth System from the different perspectives of all paleoclimate disciplines:
– Quaternary studies of abrupt transitions
– Data-driven and process-based modeling of past climate transitions
– Mathematical theory of abrupt transitions
– Methods to anticipate tipping events
– Implications of abrupt transitions for climate sensitivity

Conveners:
Manuel Chevalier, University of Bonn, Germany, chevalier.manuel@gmail.com, (lead convener) Anne Dallmeyer, Max Planck Institute für Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany
S. Yoshi Maezumi, Department of Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History Jena, Germany; Department of Ecosystem and Landscape Dynamics, Institute for Biodiversity & Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Anneli Poska, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia; Lund University, Sweden

Scientific theme: 5A: Climate proxies

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: The global vegetation distribution determines the physical properties of the land surface (e.g. albedo) and is a key player in the terrestrial carbon cycle. Hence, vegetation directly affects the climate on Earth. In turn, the global climate controls the large-scale spatial vegetation distribution. Biogeophysical and biogeochemical interactions between vegetation and climate have contributed to past climate changes and will affect the future. Understanding past vegetation dynamics and their role in the climate system is thus critical. The increasing publication of large-scale syntheses of vegetation reconstructions and the growing ability to perform long-term sophisticated Earth system model simulations allow for more and more detailed analyses of the large-scale vegetation transitions and their effect on climate. In addition, previous studies also reveal that new metrics are needed to quantitatively compare the more complex reconstructions and model results. With this session, we would like to invite all papers on the broad theme of past vegetation dynamics and their interaction with climate. This includes (a) vegetation simulations of various time intervals, (b) regional to global data–model or model– model comparison studies, (c) development of data–model comparison techniques, and (d) vegetation–climate dynamics reconstructions inferred from compilations of regional to global vegetation records. Any other related
topic (past land use or past fire dynamics) is also welcome.

Conveners:
Alessia Masi, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Palaeoscience and History group, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany, alessia.masi@uniroma1.it, (lead convener)
Konstantinos Panagiotopoulos, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, Germany Department of Geology and Geoenvironment, National Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
Katerina Kouli, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Geology and Geoenvironment, Greece
Verena Foerster, Institute of Geography Education, University of Cologne, Germany
Maria Triantaphyllou, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Geology and Geoenvironment, Greece

Scientific theme: 5A: Climate proxies

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Quaternary climate and paleoenvironment reconstructions can prove challenging in the absence of different lines of proxy data available. Therefore, the integration of biotic and abiotic data originating from analyses such as palynological, micropaleontological, sedimentological or geochemical is essential for a comprehensive understanding of Quaternary environment and climate changes. The advancements in palaeoecological research methodology allow for reconstructing ecological processes and tracing environmental changes in different time scales. New quantification and modelling approaches are applied increasingly in sedimentary archives. High-resolution datasets and their greater spatial coverage contribute in the emergence of clusters of paleoenvironmental archives in regions of interest enabling the determination of past environmental and climatic gradients. This session aims to provide an overview on the state-of-the-art in palaeoecology and complementary disciplines. We invite contributions from different Quaternary archives integrating various proxies or introducing innovative methodologies that advance our understanding of past climate and environmental
dynamics.

Conveners:
Onn Crouvi, Geological Survey of Israel, Israel, crouvi@gsi.gov.il, (lead convener) Rivka Amit, Geological Survey of Israel, Israel
Yehouda Enzel, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Scientific theme: 5A: Climate proxies

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Arid soils, developed in hot deserts (average annual rainfall <250 mm), cover ~20% of the Earth’s land surface. The properties of arid soils, and their formation pathways, are influenced by and, in turn, control soil hydrology, ecology, weathering, erosion, flooding, and eolian processes in desert environments. Moreover, as these soils are the outcome of climate, vegetation, topographic setting, parent material, time, and anthropogenic impacts, their research is essential for accurate geomorphic interpretation and reconstruction of Quaternary climates, hydrological changes, and environments. Despite the importance of arid soils and their extensive distribution, questions regarding their basic properties, formation processes, and usage for paleoclimate reconstruction and landscape evolution studies are still debated. In this session, we will bring together geologists, geomorphologists, pedologists, and geochemists that study processes of soil development and soil- geomorphology in arid regions. Current and Quaternary perspectives are welcome, specifically those that involve interactions with hydrology, climate, vegetation, and geomorphic processes. We welcome studies that use various research approaches, including field observations, measurements and monitoring, mapping, remote sensing, and modeling.

Conveners:
Ludvig Löwemark, Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan, ludvig@ntu.edu.tw, (lead convener)
Stefanie Kaboth-Bahr, Institut für Geowissenschaften, Universität Potsdam, Germany André Bahr, Institute of Earth Sciences, Heidelberg University, Germany

Scientific theme: 5A: climate proxies

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: In many parts of the world, especially outside previously glaciated regions, shallow, highly dynamic, short-lived lakes and wetlands are one of very few available sources of paleoclimatic information. However, the paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic records in these lakes and wetlands are often complex to interpret, and the environmental signals may be strongly overprinted by natural lake succession and the rapid silting up of small basins.
Interpreting these archives therefore often requires a thorough understanding of the intrinsic lacustrine processes influencing sediment input, deposition, and reworking. To disentangle environmental and climatic signals from lake and wetland internal processes, a mosaic of multiple proxies must be employed. Here we invite contributions combining biological, geochemical, sedimentological, and isotopic proxies in the paleoclimatic reconstruction of
shallow lacustrine and wetland deposits.

5B- Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

Conveners:
Gonzalo Jiménez-Moreno, Universidad de Granada, Spain, gonzaloj@ugr.es, (lead convener) Adele Bertini, Università degli Studi Firenze, Italy
Oliver Heiri, Universität Basel, Switzerland

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: High-resolution sediment records from terrestrial and marine environments covering the Holocene and other Quaternary interglacials are key to understanding how biomes, ecosystems and geosystems respond to warm climatic conditions. They provide detailed information on past analogues for constraining the potential impacts and dynamics of future global warming. The increasing evidence of human impact in these records since the Early Holocene also expands our knowledge as to how human activities have shaped present environments, ecosystems and landscapes, with major implications for modern ecosystem and geochemical research. In this session we invite the broader paleo community to share their latest results from biological and bio-geochemical proxy-indicators in lake and marine sedimentary records that provide insights into environmental and climate changes over past interglacials and the Holocene. We welcome studies presenting new records based on established indicators (e.g. pollen and other micro- or macrofossils of terrestrial plants, algae and invertebrates) that provide new insights on interglacial environments, but also those relying on emerging approaches such as, e.g., developing biomarker indicators, eDNA analysis or new numerical interpretations of sedimentary proxy data.

Conveners:
Hema Achyuthan, Institute for Ocean Management, Anna University, India, hachyuthan0@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Xiao Fu, School of Earth Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
Elodie Brisset, Department of palaeoenvironments & Macroecological Process, Institut Méditerranéen de Biodiversité et d’Ecologie Marine et Continentale, Marseille, France
Alexandra T. Gourlan, ISTerre, Université Grenoble-Alpes, Université de Savoie Mont-Blanc, CNRS, IRD, IFSTTAR, France
Rayees Shah, Mantaqi Centre for Science and Society, Islamic University of Science and Technology, University Avenue, Awantipora, Pulwama, India

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, paleoclimatic, paleoceanographic and paleoecological changes in
marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: This session will offer a platform to international Quaternary scientists working on desertification (climatologists, marine and terrestrial geologists, palaeoecologists, archaeologists, environmental historians) for presenting their works to an international audience and interacting with specialists working in relevant research fields.
The main objective of this session is to obtain new sedimentary, chronological, paleoclimate, biodiversity, and vegetation records relating to desert climate change from MIS 5 to Late Holocene, in the Eurasian continent in particular, and rebuild interaction of climate, landscape, and anthropogenic activities during this time. Based on extended-range dating approaches and newly generated proxy data, this session will address the Human- Environment-Climate interactions in Desert and desert margins since the Late Quaternary. We will look at how climate shifts shape ecosystems, modifying Desert landscapes and resource availability for Human communities. How do changes in environmental resource availability (i.e. water, soil, vegetation) may have specifically influenced cultural changes and technological innovations? How do past cycles of cultural adaptation to landscape change hold signatures for future responses to climate shifts in the Eurasian and globally?
This session will help in creating detailed datasets of deserts that track cultural and economic changes through time since MIS 5, based on different terrestrial and oceanic sites/records across the continents and different landscapes experiencing arid to sub-humid conditions. This will be achieved by presenting new data from paleolimnological, wetlands, and marine sediment cores and loess-paleosol, duricrust archives; and analyzing cultural, botanical, and faunal remains from archaeological excavations. Further, the session will focus on palaeoclimate and palaeovegetation reconstruction from palaeosols, lake sediments, marine sediment cores based on geochemical, sediment biological, and stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N, δ18O, etc.) and also the aquatic biogeochemical proxies. Desertification is a long-drawn natural processes process of land degradation forming drylands in which biological productivity is lost. It is the spread of arid areas caused by a variety of factors, and climate shift is one of the factors. For example, during the history of geomorphic evolution on the surface of earth desertification processes transforms lands like the Loess Plateau of China into desserts and is later stabilized by vegetation. Based on palaeovegetation reconstruction using stable isotopes data, this session will highlight palaeo- desertification processes, associated environments and will track desertification migration and factors involved in this process.
This session will help in establishing high-resolution (near-annual) tracking of precipitation, especially monsoon cycles, linked to paleoenvironmental shifts. These data will further assist in identifying patterning in human subsistence and site occupation. Particular attention will be paid to tracking transitional and transformative periods of human behaviour and their relationship to the extent and timing of environmental changes. The session will produce key data on human adaptive processes that can be translated into general principles of adaptation and risk mitigation and will help to build understanding about non-linear changes in environments-human systems. It will highlight the importance of joining paleoenvironmental archives with archaeological and historical records, particularly concerning economic and climate change models (e.g. Integrated Assessment Models).
Both oral and poster communications are welcome. A compilation of the papers presented will be published as a special volume of Quaternary International, Journal Quaternary Science, or Quaternary Science Reviews.

Conveners:
Ruth Plets, Flanders Marine Institute, Belgium, ruth.plets@vliz.be, (lead convener) Víctor Cartelle, Flanders Marine Institute, Belgium
Simon Fitch, University of Bradford, UK Marc Hijma, Deltares, Netherlands Amy McGuire, University of Leeds, UK
Sytze van Heteren, Geological Survey of the Netherlands, Netherlands

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: The Quaternary history of the North Sea has been one of continuous and often rapid change. Owing to its geological history, the preservation and lithology of Quaternary sediments are hugely variable throughout the North Sea region, almost absent in the South and more than 1 km in the North. Across the basin, these sediments and associated geomorphological features record the advance and retreat of ice sheets, changes in relative sea level, different successions of terrestrial/fluvial, intertidal and marine environments and evidence of Palaeolithic and Mesolithic human occupation. Academic research and commercial surveys (mostly for windfarm development) have resulted in new and usually high-resolution data sets that are revealing the diversity of environments preserved within the seabed in ever more detail.
This session aims to bring together the multidisciplinary Quaternary North Sea community (marine geologists, geomorphologists, archaeologists, palaeoenvironmentalists, modelers, engineers, etc) to discuss recent advances and future opportunities. It will explore recent progress in reconstructing the complex Quaternary history of the dynamic North Sea environment through the synthesis of sedimentary, seismic, and geoarchaeological records of landscape and environmental change. It is timely that results are being shared and interpretations from local
studies are linked to better understand the wider regional-scale evolution of the North Sea.

Conveners:
Sebastien Bertrand, Ghent University, Belgium, Sebastien.Bertrand@UGent.be, (lead convener) Willem van der Bilt, University of Bergen, Norway
Bethan Davies, Royal Holloway University of London, UK Jostein Bakke, University of Bergen, Norway
Dominic Hodgson, British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, paleoclimatic, paleoceanographic and paleoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Most glaciers in the mid- and high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere are currently experiencing dramatic retreat and thinning rates in response to a potent combination of global anthropogenic forcing and regional feedbacks. The latter include changes in Southern Ocean and atmosphere circulation; critical components of Earth`s carbon cycle that remain poorly constrained beyond the short instrumental period. A deeper understanding of the behavior of the Southern Hemisphere’s glaciers across longer Quaternary timescales will help us constrain the uncertain future trajectory of on-going changes. However, investigations of the region’s glaciers remain unevenly distributed in time and space. This session seeks to create a venue to showcase the latest research on Southern Hemisphere climate-glacier interactions by inviting contributions based on observations (monitoring and mapping), reconstructions (from marine and terrestrial archives), model-data comparisons, or a combination thereof. We particularly welcome work that advances the current state-of-the-art by presenting new methods or data from poorly investigated areas such as, for example, the sub-Antarctic islands. We also welcome contributions focused on societally relevant dimensions of glacier variability like geohazards (for example glacial
lake outburst floods) or water availability.

Conveners:
Regattieri Eleonora, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Italy, eleonora.regattieri@cnr.it, (lead convener) Giovanni Zanchetta, University of Pisa, Italy
Ilaria Isola, INGV – Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Pisa, Italy Martin Finné, Uppsala University, Sweden

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Caves are among the most conservative environments on the Earth’s surface. They are preserved from external morphogenetic processes, thus surviving the landscapes in which they were formed. Infiltrating water flowing through caves carries chemical and physical signals in the form of dissolved ions and clastic sediments. These can accumulate to form different kind of deposits that offer a wide array of physical, geochemical, and biological proxies. Therefore, cave deposits represent detailed archives of environmental, hydrological and climatic changes, that can be studied at very different timescales (from sub-annual to orbital), from the recent past to millions of years ago using a multiproxy approach. In particular, caves in the Mediterranean area and its surroundings allow to investigate the local expression of extra-regional changes, to disentangle how different combination of internal and external forcing interacted to shape Mediterranean environments, landscapes and climates, and can be studied in association with the rich archaeological record, shedding lights on the nexus between human evolution and climate change. This session wants to explore different aspects regarding the study of cave infilling (notably speleothems, but not only) as proxy for the reconstruction of Mediterranean climate and
environment over the Quaternary.

Conveners:
Isabel Cacho, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain, icacho@ub.edu, (lead convener) Fabrizio Lirer, Università Roma La Sapienza, Italy
Nathalie Combourieu-Nebout, UMR 7194 CNRS-Paris, France Giuseppe Siani, Université Paris Saclay, France

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: The Mediterranean region forms a boundary fringe between middle and low latitude atmospheric cells where semi-arid climate conditions currently dominates. In addition, the inflow of North Atlantic surface waters became a further connection pathway with North Atlantic climate-ocean variability. Changes in these atmospheric and oceanographic system have exert a major control altering climate but also marine processes over the whole Mediterranean at different timescales, including that affecting the development of Mediterranean human cultures. This session aims attracting state of the art research in both marine and continental realms, including model experiments, that provide new insights into the sensitivity of the Mediterranean region to different past changes on both atmospheric and oceanic boundary conditions. Session has particular interest in high resolution
records covering rapid climatic events of the last glacial-interglacial cycle including the Holocene but also targets other Quaternary periods of climate variability.

Conveners:
Jianyao Chen, School of Geography and Planning, Sun Yatsen University, Guangzhou, China, chenjianyao@hotmail.com / chenjyao@mail.sysu.edu.cn, (lead convener)
Jean-denis Taupin, Montpellier University, France
Sebnem Arslan, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, Turkey
Zahra Dhaoui, National school of engineers of Sfax, Sfax University, Tunisia

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Groundwater is a vital resource for humans and ecosystem, e.g., providing two billion people with drinking water. Unfortunately, groundwater extraction in most parts of the world is unsustainable especially in dry areas for unconfined aquifers or confined old groundwaters, i.e. groundwater use exceeds groundwater recharge. Groundwater renewability in an aquifer system can be defined simply as stabilization of water levels and reaching a dynamically stable equilibrium in groundwater levels within human timescales (approximately 100 years) after pumping. Managing the valuable groundwater resources is complex because groundwater systems usually have a long response time to pumping, particularly under anthropogenic activities and climate change. The occurrence of old groundwater in many deep confined aquifer systems has been reported and there are debates about their exploitation, whether age information can be used to decide on the sustainable management of the groundwater resources or not. However, it is hard to see how a reliable prognosis of future recharge can be made without knowledge about groundwater age and recharge periods in the past. This session aims at providing a platform in which different ideas about the groundwater renewability, groundwater sustainability and groundwater mining
can be discussed under a changing climate.

Conveners:
Hsun-Ming Hu, National Taiwan University, Taiwan, hsunming.hu@gmail.com, (lead convener) Gianluca Marino, Universidade de Vigo, Spain
Andrea Columbu, University of Parma, Italy
Qiuzhen Yin, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium Giovanni Zanchetta, University of Pisa, Italy

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Westerly winds have a significant role in controlling the mid-latitude climate, affecting temperatures, rainfall, hydrology, agriculture and ecosystems in the Euro-Mediterranean area, with also a far-reaching role in Middle East and Asian hydroclimate. Despite the increasing availability of (palaeo)climate records and model simulations, the physical mechanisms driving the westerly changes on different timescales are still unclear. We invite contributions investigating Quaternary decadal-to-orbital scale westerly variability using terrestrial and marine archives and model simulations. Of particular interest for this session are studies focusing on reconstructions and simulations of regional precipitation, temperature and ecosystems in the Euro-Mediterranean area, their linkages to the regional/global ocean and atmosphere circulations, and their responses to the glacial-
interglacial boundary conditions and various climate forcings.

Conveners:
Katherine Holt, Massey University, New Zealand, k.holt@massey.ac.nz, (lead convener) Alistair Seddon, University of Bergen, Norway

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Ongoing technological advances are continuing to expand the toolkit available to paleoecologists. Notable developments in recent years, related to both imaging and to biomolecular analyses have offered opportunities to greatly improve the taxonomic resolution the fossil record, which in turn can result in more accurate paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental reconstructions. While other developments related to biomolecular analyses have opened up new proxies for application to Quaternary timeframes.
The purpose pf this session to showcase the latest research applying molecular, chemical and imaging/image classification techniques in the fields of palynology and palaeoecology. We welcome presentations in methods for, or applications of any of the following: eDNA/aDNA and/or related molecular techniques; chemotaxonomy; pollen chemistry as an environmental proxy; and imaging and image classification for palaeoecology applications. We also welcome presentations involving other novel methods for paleoecology & palynology.

Conveners:
Paul J. Morris, School of Geography, University of Leeds, United Kingdom, P.J.Morris@leeds.ac.uk, (lead convener) Malin Kylander, Department of Geological Sciences and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, Sweden
Angela Gallego-Sala, Department of Geography, University of Exeter, UK
Jenny Sjöström, Department of Geological Sciences and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, Sweden
Graeme Swindles, School of Natural and Built Environment, Queen’s University Belfast, UK

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Peatlands store vast amounts of soil carbon, and have played an important role in the Earth’s climate system during the Quaternary. Stratigraphic records from peatlands provide valuable sources of information about the development of these ecosystems, the surrounding landscape, and local and regional climates. The peat palaeoenvironmental archive has been investigated using a wide variety of techniques, including biological, geochemical, geophysical and modelling techniques. Ample material for radiocarbon dating means that peat records often provide chronologically well-constrained archives of past changes in (for example) peatland vegetation, hydrological conditions, and atmospherically-derived pollen, tephra, charcoal, pollution and mineral dust. This broad session aims to bring together the latest ideas and advances across peatland Quaternary science, including the past development of these important ecosystems, and the rich variety of palaeoenvironmental records they provide. We welcome contributions from all areas of peatland Quaternary science, including field, laboratory, modelling and data-synthesis approaches. Suitable topics may include – but are not limited to – paleoecology, palaeohydrology, palaeoclimate reconstruction, carbon and/or nutrient cycling, geochemistry, past fire regimes, and novel analytical approaches. We welcome studies of peatlands in any and all geographical areas,
from the tropics to the middle and high latitudes of both hemispheres.

Conveners:
Yael Kiro, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, yael.kiro@weizmann.ac.il, (lead convener) Yonaton Goldsmith, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
Hagit Affek, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: Glacial-interglacial paleoclimate data provide a long-term perspective of the environmental response to climate change over a wide range of boundary conditions, such as varying orbital forcing and atmospheric CO2. To further understand the responses of terrestrial paleoclimate to fluctuating climatic boundary conditions, quantitative reconstructions of regional scale past climatic parameters are required. This session will focus on quantitative reconstructions of past climate derived from Quaternary terrestrial archives, using geochemical and geomorphological tools. Topics will range from reconstructing local paleoclimate metrics (e.g., rainfall amount, temperature, relative humidity, and windspeed) to reconstructing regional paleoclimate variability (e.g., shifts of rain-belts, boundaries between climate systems, varying pressure systems and temperature gradients). The session will also focus on utilizing quantitative reconstructions for understanding causes and effects, feedback mechanisms, and relationships between the climatic conditions in different regions and how these may facilitate a better understanding of the impacts of present and future climate change. We invite abstract submissions that present novel methods for quantifying past climate metrics and / or novel applications of existing methods that quantify past climate metrics on local, regional, and global scales. We also encourage studies involving modeling
(e.g., hydroclimate, geochemistry, sedimentology).

Conveners:
Nicole K. Sanderson, Texas A&M University, USA, nsanderson@tamu.edu, (lead convener) Natasha Roy, Geotop-Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada
Marie-Michèle Ouellet-Bernier, CEN-Université Laval, Canada Marco A. Aquino López, Universidad del Mar, Mexico

Scientific theme: 5B: Palaeogeographic, palaeoclimatic, palaeoceanographic and palaeoecological changes in marine and terrestrial systems

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Collaborative, transdisciplinary research has the potential to fill gaps in our understanding of landscape evolution. In order to project impacts of recent and rapid environmental changes on human societies, fostering communication is essential across disciplines as well as studied timescales and regions. As early career researchers (ECR: < 8 years from terminal degree) play a key role in advancing research, the goal of this session is to bring together ECRs working in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions, from various paleo-environmental, modelling, and social science backgrounds. The aim is to share insights into regional and global changes, new methods and technologies for measuring and interpreting climate proxies, and to build new and lasting research networks.
We welcome interdisciplinary as well as site- or method-specific contributions based on field observations, historical data, archeology,
proxy-reconstructions and/or modeling. Special attention will be paid to: (1) the climate drivers and feedbacks, by encouraging links between terrestrial (e.g., peat, lakes) and marine proxies; (2) rates of change, chronologies, and evaluating the timing and magnitude of proxy-shifts on regional and global scales using historical data and modelling; and (3) building a portrait of impacts and mitigation measures for ecosystems and communities – past,
present, and future – as the regional and global climate changes.

5C- Past global climate records in polar and mountain ice

Conveners:
Stefan Winkler, University of Würzburg, Department of Geographie and Geology, Germany, stefan.winkler@uni- wuerzburg.de, (lead convener)
Giovanni Monegato, Italian National Research Council, Institute of Geoscience and Earth Resources, Italy Rachel Oien, University of Buffalo, NY, USA
Danni Pearce, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Natural Resource Management, Norway
Jürgen Reitner, Geological Survey of Austria, Department of Sedimentary Geology, Austria

Scientific theme: 5C: Past global climate records in polar and mountain ice

INQUA commission(s):
TEPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Mountain glaciations have a long research heritage since they provide an invaluable record for past and present climate change. Mountain ranges are, furthermore, important geo-ecosystems characterised by dynamic processes and hotspots of current Global Change. Complex and divers topographical, geomorphological, climatical, and glaciological conditions can, however, make correlations on regional to global scales challenging. This problem is further enhanced by ongoing specialisation within the scientific community, whereby working groups often focus on individual aspects or selected mountain regions, thus frequently remain disconnected.
The main incentive for this session is to evaluate the potential of mountain glaciation records and to stimulate significant bridging between specialised research communities to fully utilise the vast potential the diversity of mountain glaciations offers. Contributions on all relevant aspects are welcomed, for example (a) glacial landforms and glacier reconstructions, (b) dating techniques and glacier chronologies, (c) glaciology and palaeoclimatical interpretations, (d) impacts on ecosystems and human society. Submissions involving interdisciplinary studies or highlighting specific conditions and complex interactions are encouraged. Regional studies from continental to maritime mountain ranges and from any latitude will be included to allow finding strategies to tackle existing challenges and to fully address the diversity of the topic.

Conveners:
Michael E. Weber, University of Bonn, Germany, mike.weber@uni-bonn.de, (lead convener) Frank Lamy, Alfred Wegener Institute, Germany
Molly Patterson, University of Binghampton, USA Abhijith Ulayottil Venugopal, GNS Science, New Zealand

Scientific theme: 5C: Past global climate records in polar and mountain ice

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: The INStabilities & Thresholds in ANTarctica (INSTANT) Scientific Research Programme provides a new, coordinating framework within the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR). In this session we encourage presentation and discussion of empirical and modeling studies on changes in the Southern Ocean and the Antarctic Ice Sheet on various time scales, from past geologic records to present-day instrumental data and modeling studies, to projections of future behavior. Studies that relate to an improved understanding of the ice- ocean-atmosphere forcing of marine-based ice-sheet dynamics and its interactions with the Southern Ocean are specifically welcome. These include, but are not limited to, the role of ocean dynamics on the heat exchange of the continental ice shelves and the role of sea ice and Southern Hemisphere Westerly winds on ice-sheet dynamics.
We further encourage oceanographic, paleoceanographic and modelling studies of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current system across the major oceanic fronts into the Subantarctic Zone. Such changes of surface, intermediate, and deep-water masses are intimately linked to the decay and build-up of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Advancing knowledge on such processes will help improving our understanding of past and future sea-level rise and the role
of the Southern Ocean on the carbon cycle and global heat budget.

Conveners:
Gill Plunkett, Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK, g.plunkett@qub.ac.uk, (lead convener) Siwan Davies, University of Swansea, UK
Andrea Burke, University of St Andrews, UK Michael Sigl, University of Bern, Switzerland Joe McConnell, Desert Research Institute, USA

Scientific theme: 5C: Past global climate records in polar and mountain ice

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Polar ice cores comprise an unparalleled record of past volcanism through their highly resolved records of volcanic chemistry and particulates. Establishing the provenance of volcanic signals in the ice can presently only be achieved through the geochemical characterisation of co-registered volcanic ash (fine-grained tephra).
Pinpointing the source can provide greater insight into the nature of the eruption (e.g., its magnitude, duration, column height), if known, and also enables informed estimates of stratospheric sulphate loading, and hence volcanic forcing potential, based on the relationship between the volcano location and sulphate deposition flux in the ice cores. The analysis of heavy metal and isotope signatures can help constrain further eruptive parameters as well as aerosol transport pathways, critical for differentiating the relative climatic forcing of these volcanic emissions. This session invites contributions that illustrate recent progress and innovations in the analysis of volcanic signals in polar ice cores, particularly with respect to reconstructing past climatic and societal impacts of volcanic eruptions. We welcome also presentations that highlight remaining challenges and possible solutions in
isolating, analysing and interpreting the significance of ash particles and chemical signatures in ice cores.

Conveners:
Valter Maggi, Comitato Glaciologico Italiano (CGI), Italy, valter.maggi@unimib.it, (lead convener) Marta Chiarle, CGI and IRPI-CNR Torino, Italy
Carlo Baroni, CGI and UNIPI – Pisa, Italy
Aldino Bondesan, CGI and UNIPD – Padova, Italy

Scientific theme: 5C: Past global climate records in polar and mountain ice

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: This session will review recent climatic trends of different mid latitude glaciers around the world, to evaluate the utility and fidelity of glaciological indicators of climate change at different elevations, to evaluate the
impact of climate change to mid latitude glaciers and to evaluate the Earth surface processes on biotic and abiotic resources.

Conveners:
Nessim Douss, National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics (OGS), Trieste, Italy; Department of Mathematics and Geosciences, University of Trieste, Italy, ndouss@inogs.it, (lead convener)
Viviana Maria Gamboa-Sojo, Universidad de Costa Rica, Costa Rica Karen Gariboldi, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Pisa, Italy Caterina Morigi, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Pisa, Italy
Renata Giulia Lucchi, National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics (OGS), Trieste, Italy and UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway

Scientific theme: 5C: Past global climate records in polar and mountain ice

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes;

Abstract: With the expression “pole to pole teleconnections” we refer to climate anomalies in the Arctic region, caused by oceanic or atmospheric processes originating in the Antarctic region and vice versa. These anomalies are well recognized in today’s climate but are detected with difficulties in the paleoclimate archives. Within the frame of the CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes (Coastal and Marine Processes) Commission and of the SPLOSH (Submerged Palaeolandscapes of the Southern Hemisphere) International Focus Group, the “INQUA MARE” scientific action (INtegrated QUAternary MArine REcord at Sensitive Latitudes, 2020-2024) aims to exhaustively explore the interactions between the tropical and polar regions by studying the Holocene marine sediment records from Arctic, Antarctic and Tropical regions, considered as the most sensitive areas to climate change. With this session, we would like to “recap” the first two INQUA-MARE workshops focused on the Antarctic and on the Arctic realms respectively, to open the discussion also to the terrestrial environment, and to promote next INQUA-
MARE workshop that will focus on
tropical areas and worldwide teleconnections between high and low latitude regions. We therefore welcome contributions that explore (and possibly compare) Holocene marine and terrestrial records from the Antarctic and Arctic regions highlighting anomalies ascribable to the climate fluctuations regime on the opposite Pole.

5D- Reconstruct past abrupt and extreme climate changes

Conveners:
Nick Scroxton, Maynooth University, Ireland, nick.scroxton@mu.ie, (lead convener)
Rieneke Weij, University of Cape Town, South Africa
Manfred Mudelsee, University of Potsdam, Climate Risk Analysis, Germany

Scientific theme: 5D: Reconstruct past abrupt and extreme climate changes

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: High quality age models based on precise age determinations of fixpoints in natural climate archives are the bedrock of Quaternary research. As we move into an era of multi-archive, multi-site, regional climate reconstructions, it is increasingly important that we understand the impact of age-model uncertainty on our climatic inferences. Only by reconciling the age uncertainty inherent in multiple proxy records can we understand the synchronicity in climate variations, the rates of climate change, the size of climate extremes and the abruptness of climate transitions. Further, an increasing number of studies use age determinations as climatic or environmental proxies in their own right. For example, by measuring changes in the abundance of a climate archive through time. Here, age determination uncertainty is crucial in distinguishing between real climate signals and spurious effects. Age determination and age model uncertainty therefore represent a crucial frontier in Quaternary research.
In this session we welcome submissions that deal with age determination and age model uncertainty. This includes new records, multi-site climate reconstructions investigating synchronicity and regional climate dynamics, methodological development or from new records that use age determinations as the climatic and environmental proxy. We particularly welcome quantitative approaches, dealing with age model uncertainty using novel tools
from computational statistics.

5E- Climate changes on sub-millennial to Milankovitch time scale

Conveners:
Xu Zhang, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), China, xu.zhang@itpcas.ac.cn, (lead convener) Helen Bostock, University of Queensland, Australia
Steve Barker, Cardiff University, UK
Gregor Knorr, Alfred Wegener Institute Polar and Marine Research, Germany

Scientific theme: 5E: Climate changes on sub-millennial to Milankovitch time scale

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Astronomical forcing is the most important known external driver of the climate system. Nevertheless, resultant internal climate feedbacks that invoke different climate components on different time scales, play a critical role in past climate change, which cannot be explained simply by orbital changes alone (e.g. Dansgaard- Oeschger events, glacial inception and termination, the mid-Brunhes transition, the mid-Pleistocene transition, etc.). In this session, we aim to bring together modeling, theoretical and proxy-based studies as well as novel methodologies that combine the above approaches, to study roles of centennial-to-orbital scale interactions among the atmosphere-ocean system, cryosphere and carbon cycle, advancing our understanding of the dynamics
of the nonlinear climate system during these climate transitions.

Conveners:
Harunur Rashid, College of Marine Sciences, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai, CHINA, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA, rashid.29@osu.edu, (lead convener)
Hai Cheng, Institute of Global Environmental Change, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, CHINA

Scientific theme: 5E: Climate changes on sub-millennial to Milankovitch time scale

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Since discovering the millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger climate events in Greenland ice cores and their equivalent events in the North Atlantic marine sediments, the low-latitude paleoclimate records document similar changes in tropical climates. Such millennial-scale climatic variabilities are manifested by substantial precipitation and temperature perturbation recorded in marine and terrestrial paleo-archives such as speleothems, loess, and lake sediments. While the paleo-proxy records from the northern tropics and subtropics mainly show concordant climate changes with those of the North Atlantic during the last glacial-interglacial cycle, asynchronous and even anti-correlated phenomena are exhibited in records from the southern hemisphere. For example, the Indian and East Asian monsoon systems seem to be tuned to the North Atlantic climate, whereas the South American monsoon appears to operate differently. Moreover, paleo-proxy records from the equatorial Pacific are characterized by a complex pattern of millennial-scale change that borrows elements from the northern and southern hemisphere endmembers. Such changes may allude that the tropical Pacific may have played important roles in mediating millennial-scale changes between the hemispheres. There is growing consensus that these abrupt millennial-scale climate events involved a reorganization of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), driven by the meridional heat and moisture transport. The perturbation of the AMOC has been dynamically linked to Intertropical Convergence Zone variability, which in turn is tied to coupled dynamics in the tropical Pacific. However, the physical mechanisms that link the climate system elements are not well understood.
We invite contributions dealing with the following aspects of the Indo-Asian monsoon systems: i) the timing and magnitude of both short and longer time scales, namely the Holocene and glacial cycles using paleo-archives (i.e., caves, loess, lake, and deep-sea sediments, etc.) and ii) the relationship between the tropical and the high-latitude climate systems in paleo time scale, and iii) modeling studies that incorporate both observational and modeling
perspectives.

5F- Climate modelling and data assimilation: simulate past changes and future scenarios

Conveners:
Angelo Vulpiani, Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Roma “La Sapienza”, Italy, angelo.vulpiani@uniroma1.it, (lead convener)
Antonello Provenzale, Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse (IGG) – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Italy

Scientific theme: 5F: Climate modelling and data assimilation: simulate past changes and future scenarios

INQUA commission(s):
PALCOM-Palaeoclimates;

Abstract: Given the presence of several mechanisms with very different characteristic times (from days for atmospheric phenomena to thousands of years for deep ocean flows and ice shields) modulated by the slow astronomical forcing, building of a coherent description of climate dynamics in the Quaternary is a challenging problem. Data modelling and inference provides a possible avenue, involving many different topics from nonlinear
time series analysis to information theory and inference protocols.

5G- Global, regional and local sea-level changes and drivers

Conveners:
Nicole Khan, University of Hong Kong, nskhan@hku.hk, (lead convener) Roger Creel, Columbia University, USA
Matteo Vacchi, Università di Pisa, Italy Natalya Gomez, McGill University, Canada

Scientific theme: 5G: Global, regional and local sea-level changes and drivers

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Addressing societal concerns about the damage that sea-level rise may cause to coastal communities and the global economy requires an understanding of the Earth system dynamics that produce these changes. The past behavior of ice sheets, oceans, and the solid Earth – and their effects on sea level – provide key information to address this challenge. We welcome contributions that focus on (1) sea-level and ice-sheet evolution in the geologic past and over the instrumental record; (2) Earth system processes affecting sea-level change, including glacial isostatic adjustment, ocean dynamics, and mantle dynamic topography; (3) integrating proxy and instrumental observations via statistical and/or physical modeling to understand these changes; and (4) leveraging past records to project future sea level.
Sponsored by HOLSEA (Geographic variability of HOLocene SEA level) and PALSEA (PALeo constraints on SEA level rise) working groups of the International Union for Quaternary Sciences (INQUA) and Past Global Changes (PAGES) and IAG subcomission 3.4 on Cryosphere Deformation, this session particularly encourages submissions that engage with adjacent scientific disciplines (e.g. geodynamics, geomorphology, stratigraphy, glaciology, geophysics,
paleobiology, etc.) and explores avenues for constraining uncertainties in sea-level and ice-sheet reconstructions.

6- The Quaternary time machine

Conveners:
Svenja Riedesel, Institute of Geography, University of Cologne, Germany, svenja.riedesel@uni-koeln.de, (lead convener)
Julie Durcan, School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, UK
Georgina King, Institute of Earth Surface Dynamics, Université de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland Sebastian Kreutzer, Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, UK Christoph Schmidt, Institute of Earth Surface Dynamics, Université de Lausanne, Switzerland

Scientific theme: 6: The Quaternary time machine

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History, PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Trapped charge dating techniques, such as luminescence and electron spin resonance (ESR), are key Quaternary geochronological techniques, offering a dateable age range between decades and millions of years and applicability to a broad range of geological and archaeological contexts. The field of trapped charge dating is rapidly developing, and recent methodological and statistical advances have transformed their application beyond classical dating, e.g. the use of signals as sediment provenancing tools, quantifying past rock cooling histories or palaeosurface temperatures. These novel approaches foster new applications and perspectives to answer complex questions concerning Quaternary environmental change.
In this session, we invite abstracts focused on novel applications and methodological developments of trapped charge dating in Quaternary research, which advance the technique beyond a single date or age sequence. We particularly welcome submissions presenting the use of luminescence and ESR methods for sediment provenance or transport analyses, palaeothermometry or thermochronometry. Submissions on novel models and/or statistics
aimed at refining chronologies or integrating large sets of chronological data are also welcome.

Conveners:
Stefano Andreucci, University of Cagliari, Italy, sandreucci@unica.it, (lead convener) Daniele Sechi, University of Sassari, Italy
Mark Bateman, University of Sheffield, UK Vincenzo Pascucci, University of Sassari, Italy

Scientific theme: 6: The Quaternary time machine

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology;

Abstract: The surface of our planet preserves extensive sediment archives recording the recent Earth evolutions and Human hystory butonly a well established geochronological framework can afford to fully understand these processes. Luminescence dates deposition back to 200,000 years or more and applications cover many depositional environments (shallow and deep marine, coastal, aeolian, fluvial, alluvial, periglacial, etc.), and it has made significant contributions to archaeology. Over the last 30 years, the method has seen significant extensionsin datable minerals (quartz, feldspars, polymineral), material sizes (silt, sand and cobble),procedures (single or multiple grains, rock slice) and dating protocols (OSL, pIRIR, IRPL, pulsing,etc.).It is still undergoing development and improvement, and exciting new application frontiers are waiting to be explored. Such as discovering new potential datable materials, new luminescence signals, the extension of the age range, improvement of precision and accuracy, and last but not least, improvements to dose rate estimation. Luminescence has shown its strength but have to develop further in order to face push back further Quaternary dating frontiers. Contributions on latest research related to luminescence development and their application to stratigraphic, planetary geological and
archaeological issues are welcome.

Conveners:
Paola Petrosino, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Italy, petrosin@unina.it, (lead convener) Donatella D. Insinga, CNR-ISMAR, Italy
Christian Gorini, Sorbonne Université, CNRS-INSU, France

Scientific theme: 6: The Quaternary time machine

INQUA commission(s):
CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes; SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology

Abstract: The “event stratigraphy” approach results particularly effective to the study of marine successions in geodynamically and volcanic active areas. The repeated arrival of pyroclastic and volcanoclastic deposits via flows, fallout, submarine landslides, debris avalanche, turbidity currents generated during eruptions, volcano flank failures and earthquakes may play, in fact, a main role in the stratigraphic architecture of a basin and its coastal margins producing event beds or event horizons which punctuate the marine sequences. They mark isochronous events (depositional, non-depositional, erosional and biological) and, if widely distributed and multi-proxy resolved, they become fundamental to correlate archives both within and between depositional basins, thus providing a timing for a large range of scientific purposes.
In this session, contributions from the fields of geochronology, tephrostratigraphy, micropaleontology, sedimentology, organic and inorganic geochemistry, stable isotopes, palaeomagnetism and seismic stratigraphy addressed to an integrated approach for the analysis of recent marine sequences are welcome.

Conveners:
Redzhep Kurbanov, Institute of Deserts, flora and fauna of Turkmenistan, Turkmen National Academy of Sciences, Turkmenistan, roger.kurbanov@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Valentina Yanko-Hombach, Faculty of Geology, Mechnikov Odessa State University, Odessa, Ukraine

Scientific theme: 6: The Quaternary time machine

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; PALCOM-PalaeoclimatesM

Abstract: This session will unite community investigating environmental change, sea-level fluctuations and water balance of the Eurasian intercontinental basins of the Aral, Caspian, Black, Marmara, Aegean seas with their connecting straits and coasts. During the Quaternary, these basins were repeatedly connected and isolated from each other. This predetermined their environmental conditions and hydrologic regimes and imposed specific impacts on diverse biological populations, including humans inhabiting the coastal domains. The goal of this session is to provide cross-disciplinary and cross-regional correlation of geological, archaeological, environmental, and anthropological records. We expect participants from a wide community of researchers from all over the
world and especially from the members of INQUA POCSA IFG and Evolutionary Geography Commission of IGU.

6A- Marine and terrestrial stratigraphy. Advances in correlation

Conveners:
Pierluigi Pieruccini, Università di Torino, Italy (lead convener)

Scientific theme: 6A: Marine and terrestrial stratigraphy. Advances in correlation

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology;

Abstract: Across-Europe and Asia stratigraphical correlation is the main goal of the session. In fact, in most Eurasian Regions Quaternary stratigraphical schemes were developed using complex litho-, chrono-, and bio- stratigraphical criteria that made correlations also due to the fragmentary nature of these record. Terminology defining the chrono-stratigraphical setting is still often based and exchanging on local or old-fashioned schemes and the need for a common language/terminology/methodology is strongly necessary in order to share among Eurasian Quaternary scientists basic geoscientific information. Solid stratigraphical subdivisions functional to mapping and modeling are therefore strongly needed also for practical purposes that includes the prevention of geohazards and risks.
Contributions concerning across-Regions correlations, new data from case studies and summaries of Quaternary type-sites of stratigraphical importance are welcome. Litho-, bio-, pedo-, morpho and chrono-stratigraphical data are fundamental for climate changes reconstructions, landscape evolution and natural hazards assessment to have
a common view of Eurasian Quaternary history.

Conveners:
Phil Gibbard, University of Cambridge, UK, plg1@cam.ac.uk, (lead convener) Thijs van Kolfschoten, Leiden University, Netherlands
Charles Turner, University of Cambridge, UK
Pierluigi Pieruccini, Università di Torino, Italy

Scientific theme: 6A Marine and terrestrial stratigraphy. Advances in correlation

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology;

Abstract: The session deals with the environmental evolution, palaeontology and stratigraphy of the early Middle Pleistocene. This period, beginning at the Matuyama–Brunhes (M–B) paleomagnetic polarity boundary, dated broadly to 773 ka, and ending with the Elsterian Glaciation (and its equivalents), therefore represents a critical interval corresponding as it does with the early-Middle Pleistocene Transition (EMPT). This interval not only saw major environmental changes, but also the significant changes in the biota, including human migration, etc.
The great difficulty in establishing the basic sequence of events during this complex period has generally been hampered by the fragmentary nature of the record preserved, and the fact that the period saw the first major expansions of the great continental ice sheets into much of Europe. That the record is preserved in this region has until recently driven discussions on this period. However, the discovery of more complete sequences in southern and eastern Europe, together with the analysis of marine records from neighbouring ocean-floor profiles, have held a mirror to the northern regions’ record, showing that there is a need to re-evaluate the events during this critical period and examine them in a new light.
During the session integrated syntheses of the regional evidence will be presented.

Conveners:
Simona Todaro, Department of Earth and Marine Sciences, University of Palermo, Italy, simona.todaro@unipa.it, (lead convener)
Daniele Spatola, Department of Earth Sciences, Sapienza University, Italy Marcello Gugliotta, Faculty of Geosciences, University of Bremen, Germany

Scientific theme: 6A: Marine and terrestrial stratigraphy. Advances in correlation

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; CMP-Coastal & Marine Processes

Abstract: Quaternary stratigraphic records provide evidence at both regional and global scales for climate and sea- level changes, as well as faunal and floral turnover and landscape evolution. These depositional archives that allow studying the geological evolution of the Earth include terrestrial and marine sequences.
Marine successions mainly record global-scale changes, whereas terrestrial successions largely display regional responses to global changes. Also, terrestrial successions are often diachronous, asynchronous, or both, leading to difficulties in global correlations. Nevertheless, even if terrestrial records are often challenging to decipher, the correlation with the marine stratigraphy surely has important implications for improving the understanding of global changes.
An advancement on terrestrial-to-marine correlation can be achieved with multidisciplinary approaches involving sedimentology, geochemistry, geomorphology, and seismic stratigraphy. This session aims to collect multidisciplinary studies on the reconstruction of the stratigraphic record using new approaches. We welcome contributions to this session from studies on terrestrial to marine areas from any region, and with emphasis on the above-mentioned disciplines.

Conveners:
Jeroen Schokker, TNO – Geological Survey of the Netherlands, Netherlands, jeroen.schokker@tno.nl, (lead convener)
Irene M. Waajen, Utrecht University, Netherlands
Frank P. Wesselingh, Naturalis Biodiversity Centre, Netherlands Philip L. Gibbard, University of Cambridge, UK
Maria Fernanda Sanchez Goñi, Université de Bordeaux, France

Scientific theme: 6A: Marine and terrestrial stratigraphy. Advances in correlation

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Marine Isotope Stage 5 (71-130 ka BP) encompasses a long and complex period of climate-related environmental change, accompanied by strong shifts in flora and fauna. The well-studied Last Interglacial (MIS 5e) was followed by alternating stadial (MIS 5d, b) and interstadial conditions (MIS 5c, a), before the severe glaciation of MIS 4 set in.
The MIS 5d-a interval is relatively poorly known, because the subsequent glacial period eroded much of the sedimentary and fossil record. Many remaining late MIS 5 records are located on submerged continental shelves and/or covered by glacial deposits. However, more secluded locations like small glacial or tectonic basins, but also fluvial and marine terrace successions and loess-paleosol sequences contain well-studied high-resolution multi- proxy records covering this period. MIS 5d-a is also a period when the typical ice-age megafauna co-existed with several hominine species. Correlation of these diverse sequences is problematic, because similar environmental conditions occurred repeatedly, there probably was a strong gradient from oceanic to continental regions and possibilities for absolute dating in this time range are scarce.
This session aims to clarify the sedimentary expression, paleoclimate history and chronology of the sub-stages MIS 5d-a from marine and terrestrial settings across the world. We specially encourage submissions that focus on long-
distance correlation and dating methodology.

6B- GSSPs and stratotypes

Conveners:
Martin J. Head, Brock University, Canada, mjhead@brocku.ca, (lead convener) Jan Zalasiewicz, University of Leicester, UK
Adele Bertini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy Liping Zhou, Peking University, China

Scientific theme: 6B: GSSPs and stratotypes

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The Quaternary System has traditionally been divided into subseries and regional stages, but global stages significantly enhance chronostragraphic precision and six are now defined including three for the Holocene Series. The Middle Pleistocene Subseries and Chibanian Stage were officially defined in 2020 through ratification of the Chiba GSSP, Japan. Their shared base dated at 774.1 ka represents the approximate midpoint of the Early– Middle Pleistocene transition, a 1.4–0.4 Ma interval marked by the progressive increase in amplitude of climate oscillations and a shift towards quasi-100 ky frequency. The Middle Pleistocene and Chibanian are both terminated presently by the base of the Upper Pleistocene Subseries, dated provisionally at ~129 ka. To improve precision, we consider a possible second stage for the Middle Pleistocene, its base coincident with the ‘Mid- Brunhes Event’. This event marks a step-increase in the amplitude of quasi-100 kyr climate cycles, and especially global ice-volume minima, from MIS 12–MIS 11 (Termination V, ~420 ka) onwards. This level approximates the bases of the Holsteinian, Hoxnian, Likhvinian, and Zavadivian regional stages across northwestern and central Europe, the Russian Plain, and the Ukrainian Loess Plain; and can be traced across the Chinese Loess Plateau. We welcome contributions based on marine, terrestrial, and ice-core evidence that examine the practicability of such
a second stage for the Middle Pleistocene.

Conveners:
Jan Zalasiewicz, University of Leicester, UK, jaz1@leicester.ac.uk, (lead convener) Adele Bertini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy
Martin J. Head, Brock University, Canada Liping Zhou, Peking University, China

Scientific theme: 6B: GSSPs and stratotypes

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: In the Quaternary System, six global stages are now defined that significantly enhance chronostratigraphic precision, including three for the Holocene Series. At this level, tasks still to complete are to establish a Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the Upper Pleistocene Subseries and to consider the addition of an Anthropocene chronostratigraphic unit. However, beyond this, the complex climatic history of the Quaternary, with its teleconnections and millennial-scale fluctuations, is reflected in a rich diversity of environmental records that allow fine-scale stratigraphic subdivisions for this period. Although not formal in the sense of ratified GSSP-based chronostratigraphic units, these subdivisions closely intersect and help characterise and define them. They include the now iconic marine isotope (sub)stages, loess-paleosol subdivisions, and event stratigraphy as applied to Greenland ice cores and marine records. They also include regionally-based stages including the Elsterian, Cromerian, Okian and Tiligulian, some perhaps now more akin to ‘ecobiostratigraphic zones’, and other terms that are more widely geographically applicable such as the Bølling Interstadial and Younger Dryas Stadial. Given the continuing advances in formal Quaternary stratigraphy, we invite contributions with terrestrial or/and oceanic records to discuss these finer-scale units and their evolving relations to this part of
the Geological Time Scale.

Conveners:
Antonio Caruso, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Italy (lead convener) antonio.caruso@unipa.it
Adele Bertini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy Patrizia Maiorano, Università di Bari Aldo Moro, Italy Maria Marino, Università di Bari Aldo Moro, Italy

Scientific theme: 6B: GSSPs and stratotypes

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: The base of the Quaternary System at 2.58 Ma occurs within the context of intensified Northern Hemisphere glaciation beginning with MIS G6 (~2.73 Ma) in the latest Pliocene and continuing through to MIS 100, 98 and 96 (2.54–2.43 Ma) in the Early Pleistocene. Glacial MIS 104 at 2.60 Ma offers a pronounced globally correlative climatostratigraphic signature just below the base of the Quaternary. The Quaternary System, Pleistocene Series, Lower Pleistocene Subseries, and Gelasian Stage are all defined by the Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) at Monte San Nicola, near Gela, Sicily, Italy. The GSSP is placed at the base of a marly layer overlying the sapropelic Nicola bed, a regionally prominent layer approximating the level of the Gauss– Matuyama geomagnetic reversal. The Nicola bed is ∼20 cm thick and corresponds to Mediterranean Precession- Related Cycle 250. The Nicola Bed, GSSP, and Gauss–Matuyama geomagnetic reversal all occur within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 103. The GSSP at Monte San Nicola had not been studied in detail since its ratification in 1996. In 2021, the INQUA-SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology-SQS-sponsored international program GELSTRAT was initiated to reinvestigate this GSSP employing modern methods at high stratigraphic resolution. This session will
present the initial results of GELSTRAT but also seeks contributions on the Pliocene–Pleistocene transition including its climatic evolution at the global scale.

Conveners:
Colin N. Waters, University of Leicester, UK, cw398@leicester.ac.uk, (lead convener) Simon Turner, University College London, UK
Jan Zalasiewicz, University of Leicester, UK Martin J. Head, Brock University, Canada

Scientific theme: 6B: GSSPs and stratotypes

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; HABCOM-Humans & Biosphere

Abstract: By the time of the XXI INQUA Congress the Anthropocene Working Group of the Subcommission on Quaternary Stratigraphy will have identified the preferred Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point for the Anthropocene from 12 candidate sections. Irrespective of a final decision on formalization there is clarity that this proposed epoch, commencing in the mid-20th century, exemplifies our growing understanding of modern human- forced environmental and climate change. Characterized by an array of physical, chemical, biological and climatic signatures, the Anthropocene records a profound shift in the Earth System. Some signatures will prove to be short spikes in which human activities caused perturbations that are quickly reversed through policy changes (e.g. fallout radionuclides, fly ash particles, certain organic pesticides). Others will continue as clear markers into the near future (e.g. microplastics) and long-term (e.g. CO2-forced climate change), irrespective of current actions.
Others will represent permanent and growing changes (e.g. extinctions and species transfers) demonstrating that the realities of the Holocene world no longer persist. We invite presentations on the role of analysis of contemporary geological archives in demonstrating both the scale and persistence of measureable environmental change during the Anthropocene, and what that tells us of likely future trajectories for this new phase of Earth
history.

6C- Geochronology. Progress in dating technique

Conveners:
Paula Marques Figueiredo, North Carolina State University, USA, paula_figueiredo@ncsu.edu, (lead convener) Gayatri Indah Marliyani, Gadjah Mada University, Indonesia
Nathan Brown, University of Texas, Arlington, USA Pedro Val, Universidade Federal Ouro Preto, Brazil

Scientific theme: 6C: Geochronology. Progress in dating technique

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Landscapes build up or erode through time as a balance between rates of surface, tectonic, and climatic processes. To quantify rates of evolution, we need to constrain the age of landforms and the timing of processes. Landscape changes occur at steady or variable rates and may be spatially variable according to lithology, tectonics, and climate. Slow and steady processes of landscape change including uplift or denudation may be less than a few mm/yr to tens of mm/yr. Landscape shaping processes can be cyclical, like glacial advances and retreats and sea- level changes. Processes can also be sudden and with variable magnitudes, such as landslides, floods, storms, volcano eruptions, earthquakes, and tsunamis. All of the above actively shape landscapes in the timescale of hundreds to thousands of years. In the past decade, new geochronological techniques and advancements in geochronological methods have extended geochronology to a wider range of environments and are critical to improving datasets’ reliability. We propose a session to discuss and share geochronology advancements in landform dating, with application to landscape evolution and extreme events. We welcome abstracts describing geochronological methods applied to linking landscape change and their respective sedimentary record within the
Quaternary (e.g. radiocarbon, luminescence, electron-spin resonance, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides, tephrochronology), in particular studies combining multiple dating techniques.

Conveners:
Fabio Florindo, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Roma, Italy, fabio.florindo@ingv.it, (lead convener)
Wout Krijgsman, Dept Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, Netherlands

Scientific theme: (6C- Geochronology. Progress in dating technique)

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; PALCOM-Palaeoclimates

Abstract: Magnetic methods are important for assigning both absolute and relative time to geological sequences. Magnetostratigraphy and correlation to the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) constitute a standard dating tool in the Earth sciences, applicable to a wide variety of rock types formed in different environments (continental, lacustrine, marine). In addition, paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental changes studies are research topics in which rock and mineral magnetic techniques are routinely applied to provide important insights that help to detect, monitor, and quantify signals from our past and present environment.
The session invites contributions that use magnetic methods to improve the GPTS, better date the geological record, help understand paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental changes, and studies from all areas of rock and
environmental magnetism related to climatic, stratigraphic or environmental applications.

Conveners:
Nupur Tiwari, IISER Mohali, Punjab, India, nupurtiwari05@gmail.com, (lead convener) Garima Khansili, Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, Pune, India
Ekta Singh, Shoolini University, H.P, India
Diptimayee Behera, Department of EES, IISER Mohali, India
Priyanka Singh, Luminescence Dating Laboratory, BSIP Lucknow, U.P India

Scientific theme: 6C: Geochronology. Progress in dating technique

INQUA commission(s):
TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History;

Abstract: Dating archaeological records belonging to the Quaternary period often pose challenges to archaeologists, geologists and geochronologists alike. The nature of geomorphological processes varies regionally, creating a research bias due to the dateable and non-dateable contexts. Quite often, the dates derived are not 100% reliable and are only an estimation and, ironically, not absolute. An array of dating techniques can be applied to sediments and other archaeological materials to determine the age of the artefacts, using dating methods such as OSL, ESR, TL, radiocarbon dating, amino acids and others. Still, they are all affected by their respective limitations due to the dynamic nature of the landscape and depositional processes, which are significant factors to consider before reaching a conclusion. Another vital issue is that the interpretations made by geologists and archaeologists vary from each other in some cases. While geologists tend to look at the geomorphology and sediment deposition, archaeologists focus more on the archaeological background, site formation processes, and artefactual integrity. Equilibrium between the two is often lost in such a scenario. Thus, weaving around the complications and problems faced by the scholars described above, this session invites papers that address the current issues faced in dating and interpreting geoarchaeological contexts in the Quaternary
period globally.

6D- Quaternary Mapping and modelling

Conveners:
Kristine Asch, Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, BGR, Hannover, Germany, Kristine.Asch@bgr.de, (lead convener)
Marco Pantaloni, Geological Survey of Italy Department, ISPRA, Roma, Italy Pierluigi Pieruccini, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università di Torino, Italy Luca Guerrieri, Geological Survey of Italy Department, ISPRA, Roma, Italy

Scientific theme: 6D: Quaternary Mapping and modelling

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology; TERPRO-Terrestrial Processes, Deposits and History

Abstract: Quaternary geology encompasses the rocks and deposits on which we live and Quaternary maps show the geology directly beneath our feet. Quaternary maps – up to the end of the 20th century on paper, now mostly digital – are essential for understanding the Quaternary Period of Earth’s history. The Quaternary Map of Europe and Adjacent Areas (IQUAME2500) demonstrates that at a small scale across-continents correlations are possible. This session invites contributions from regional and national Quaternary mappers worldwide and from participants to the IQUAME project. The presentations will encompass the stratigraphical and cartographical classification approaches and may include genetic and historical aspects. Presentations on mapping methodological aspects and
GIS-based database design and production issues are also welcome.

Conveners:
Marcello Tropeano, Dept. Scienze della Terra e Geoambientali, Bari University, Italy, marcello.tropeano@uniba.it, (lead convener)
Luigi Bruno, Dept Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Modena and Reggio Emilia University, Italy Claudio Di Celma, Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologia, Camerino University, Italy
Vincenzo Festa, Dept. Scienze della Terra e Geoambientali, Bari University, Italy Luisa Sabato, Dept. Scienze della Terra e Geoambientali, Bari University, Italy

Scientific theme: 6D: Quaternary Mapping and modelling

INQUA commission(s):
SACCOM-Stratigraphy & Chronology;

Abstract: Extensional and compressional sedimentary basins develop in different geodynamic contexts and represent unique archives on past relationship between tectonics, climate and sea/base-level changes. However, the lack of adequate age control in syntectonic strata prevents the disentangling of the roles of the different kinds of control in shaping the stratigraphic record. Quaternary sedimentary basins offer the opportunity to read these relationships, becouse their study is advantaged by high-resolution dating methods (available through integration of ash dating, biostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy and climatostratigraphy), a potential easy control on source to sink dynamics, often a scarce diagenesis of sediments. Quaternary basins, being relatively little deformed, represent good counterparts to be compared with older deposits, and, at the same time, could be used to image the possible evolution of the Planet. Moreover, Quaternary basins could store a large amount of fresh water as well as hydrate gas whose manage and exploitation need to be cautionary being strictly related to anthropic-
induced phenomena of subsidence and/or sediment failure and/or pollution.

7 – Time for Change in Quaternary Sciences

Conveners:
Jill Pelto, Climate Change Artist, pelto.jill@gmail.com, (lead convener)
Laura Parducci, Department of Environmental Biology, La Sapienza University of Rome, Italy Stephen T. Jackson, US Geological Survey and University of Arizona, USA

Scientific theme: 7:Time for change in Quaternary sciences

INQUA commission(s):
ALL;

Abstract: We all do excellent Quaternary research that deserves to be presented in the best possible way, and we all want to learn how to convey our research most effectively to our peers and to nonspecialist audiences. As fluent as we may be in writing or talking about our science and results from the past, we may still lack one essential element of scientific communication in our repertoire: the translation of our work into clear, aesthetically attractive, and pedagogically effective images and figures. Among the first scientists to use scientific illustrations effectively to generate and test scientific hypotheses was Alexander von Humboldt. His works have visually described landforms, vegetation, and individual plants and animals, demonstrated complex natural processes and concepts, and enabled us to see and better understand nature. Today science communication is a growing research field, whether through art, outreach, journalism, or other means, and creating ways to communicate science effectively requires that we continue to develop creative tools and collaborations.
In this session we will bring together Quaternary scientists who engage with art, science communication researchers, visual science communicators and scientific illustrators, to discuss current and future challenges and
opportunities in presenting scientific data and research from the Quaternary period.

Conveners:
Becky Briant, Birkbeck, University of London, UK, b.briant@bbk.ac.uk, (lead convener) Joaquin Arroyo-Cabrales, Laboratorio de Arqueozoologia, Inah Moneda, Mexico
Frank Mugyenyi, African Mineral Vision Tom Roland, University of Exeter, UK
Ahmed Serkhane, Algerian Geological Survey Agency; University of Science and Technology Houari Boumediene, Algeria
Ashok Kumar Singhvi, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India

Scientific theme: 7:Time for change in Quaternary sciences

INQUA commission(s):
ALL;

Abstract: This session will discuss effective collaboration across borders in research and teaching in Quaternary Science. Historically, in countries south of the Brandt line, most research initiatives have been taken largely by scientists from countries north of it. These at times lead to parachute science resulting in career advancement of those from affluent countries, with a simultaneous compromise on the intellectual property rights (IPR) of in- country researchers, and even science underdevelopment in those countries.
For INQUA to be effective in it’s aim to bring researchers together for international collaborations, we should in addition to the financial support for networking targeted at lower-income countries, engage with these inequalities of training and resources between researchers, seeking to both understand and address them, even participating in capability-building in science-underdeveloped countries.
This session will welcome presentations on solutions to those inequalities, for example: how to enhance the global visibility of local science; norms to protect local IP, particularly when science is published in local languages; suggestions for initiatives for effective and fair collaborations between researchers across nationalities; capacity building in lower-income countries; the ethics of removal of samples and artefacts from their native countries for
study and / or display elsewhere; best practices in teaching to include work by in-country researchers.

Conveners:
Naomi Holmes, Sheffield Hallam University, UK, n.holmes@shu.ac.uk, (lead convener) Daniel Schillereff, King’s College London, UK
Kathryn Adamson, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK Jane Hart, Southampton University, UK

Scientific theme: 7:Time for change in Quaternary sciences

INQUA commission(s):
ALL;

Abstract: Quaternary Science, as part of the wider Geoscience community, is not a diverse field. Ethnic and racial diversity are low across the geosciences, and, although gender diversity has seen some progress, diversity continues to decline with advancing career stage. Conventional approaches to teaching and research are increasingly shown to reinforce a lack of diversity within our community, for example the expectations of commitment to fieldwork which may also be problematic for people with disabilities, caring responsibilities, economic disadvantage, and those identifying as LGBTQ+ (acknowledging the importance of intersectionality).
There are growing efforts to embed equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) into our professional practices but initiatives and actions tend to be localised; within departments or research groups. It is therefore timely to share and reflect on initiatives, experiences and outcomes, allowing our community to identify and learn from best practice, develop tailored initiatives and embed EDI more efficiently moving forwards.
In this session we welcome case studies of effective approaches to increase EDI across a wide range of relevant spaces, for example field, laboratory, conference, classroom and online. We also welcome contributions rooted in data, for example exploring demographics of the Quaternary Science community as a whole or in certain parts of the world, or investigating involvement in specific sub-disciplines, methods or work environments.